Friday Tidbits From The USATF Championships

(from Mike Mahon)


2013 USA OUTDOOR TRACK & FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Friday, June 21,

Drake Stadium, Des Moines, Iowa

Attendance: 7,622

Temperature reached high of 89 degrees at  5:43 p.m. There was a high humidity of 84 percent at 12 pm

U.S. HISTORY MADE IN 100 FINALS

The times for all places in the finals of the women's 100 finals and the top six in the men's 100 finals are the fastest ever run in a U.S. Outdoor Championship meet that wasn't an Olympic Trials and that also includes the NCAA Championships.

2013 WORLD LEADING MARKS SET (THREE)

Heptathlon - Sharon Day, 6550 pts  Friday

W 100 - Barbara Pierre, 10.85  Friday semis

M 100-- Tyson Gay, 9.75  Friday finals

Two world leading marks were set in a 12-minute span at USA Outdoor Championships Friday night.

At 6:20 p.m. two-time Olympian Sharon Day won the 800 to capture the two-day heptathlon with a world-leading and personal best score of 6,550 points. Day's point total ranks No. 5 on all-time U.S. list. Then at 6:32 p.m. Barbara Pierre ran a world best in heat one of the women's 100 in 10.85.

 

THE TOP 4 TIMES IN THE WORLD WERE ACHIEVED FRIDAY NIGHT IN THE WOMEN'S 100

1. 10.85, Barbara Pierre, Nike (semis)    10.85 English Gardner, Nike (finals)

2. 10.87, English Gardner, Nike (semis)

3. 10.90, Octavious Freeman, Central Florida (semis)

4. 10.91, Alexandria Anderson, Nike,  (semis)

2013 U.S. LEADING MARKS (ONE)

W Javelin - Brittney Borman 199-10  (Thurs night)

DRAKE STADIUM RECORDS

W 10,000 - Shalene Flanagan 31:43.20  (Thursday)

W 100H - Lolo Jones, 12.50 Friday prelims

W 100  - Barbara Pierre, 10.85 Friday semis

              English Gardner, 10.85 Friday's finals

M 400 -- LaShawn Merritt, 44.36, Friday semis

M 100 - Tyson Gay, 9.75, Friday finals

IT WAS A GREAT DAY

Two-time Olympian  Sharon Day led throughout the competition and compiled a personal best of 6,550 to win her second USA title in the women's heptathlon. Day's score is the best in the world this year and only four U.S. women have scored higher. Day racked up PRs in the long jump (20-2.5) and javelin (155-5) and recorded personal bests in the 100 hurdles (13.54) and 200 (24.02) on Thursday. Day also won the USA title in 2011. Bettie Wade was second with 6,018 points and Erica Bougard, last year's junior champion, was third with 5,990.

LOLO SOARS

   Local favorite Lolo Jones sped to a Drake Stadium record in her preliminary heat in the women's 100 hurdles. The Des Moines native ran 12.50 to break the old stadium record of 12.65 by Damu Cherry in 2010. NCAA champion Brianna Rollins then ran 12.33 in the next heat, but it was wind-aided (2.3 mps), so Jones got to keep the record. Rollins did post the best all-conditions time in the world this year. She already had the best time without the wind at 12.39 en route to winning the NCAA title June 8 in Eugene, Ore. In the history of the event, Rollins is one of only eight athletes to run that fast in all conditions. Drake Relays champion Queen Harrison then won the final heat in a wind-aided 12.44.

   All six runners in Rollins' heat advanced to the semifinals, including Vashti Thomas, who ran on the Academy of Art shuttle hurdle relay team that set an all-time collegiate record at the Drake Relays fans in April. Also advancing was Kellie Wells, the 2012 Olympic bronze medalist. 2012 Olympic Silver medalist Dawn Harper won the first heat in 12.60.

    

  TOUGH BREAK

  The semifinals of the women's 100 were so fast that Lauryn Williams ran 11-flat and still didn't make the finals. It was the fastest non-qualifying time ever in a 100, anywhere in the world. The main reason: The race produced the four fastest time in the world this year. Barbara Pierre ran 10.85 for the fastest time in winning the first heat. In the second heat, English Gardner ran 10.87, Octavious Freeman had a 10.90 and Alexandria Anderson ran 10.91. Jeneba Tarmoh earned the last spot in the finals from that heat, her 10.98 edging Williams for that spot.

  Pierre's time broke the Drake Stadium record of 11.06 by LaShauntea Moore in 2010.

  A little more than two hours later, Gardner matched Pierre's time in winning the final, edging Freeman at the finish. Freeman ran 10.87, Anderson was third with another 10.91 and Tarmoh took fourth in 10.93 to match the previous world best . Pierre finished fifth in 10.94.

 

  RAPID FIRE MARKS

  Day's world best in the heptathlon and Pierre's world-leading mark in the 100 came in a dazzling span of just 12 minutes. Within minutes after that, American record holder Tyson Gay matched the best all-conditions time in the world at 9.75. Gay then overcame a slow start to run another 9.75 to win the final, this one legal, for the best time in the world and a Drake Stadium record. The old record was 9.89 by Ngonidzashe Makusha of Florida State in 2011. It was Gay's first national title since 2008.

 

  ANOTHER MEET, ANOTHER TITLE

  A.G. Kruger did it again in the hammer, throwing 247-9 to win his fifth USA title. It's the first championship since 2009 for the Sheldon, Iowa, native and three-time Olympian, who also won in 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009.

 

  SLOW RECOVERY FOR RICHARDS-ROSS

  Six-time USA outdoor champion Sanya Richards-Ross made it to the finals in the women's 400, but she'll go in with only the seventh-fastest time out of the eight qualifiers. Richards-Ross, the 2012 Olympic gold medalist, grabbed the fourth and last spot out of her semifinal heat, running 51.53. She had surgery on her right big toe last September and still isn't running at full speed. Francena McCorory, No. 2 on the world list this year, had the fastest time to Saturday's final at 50.53.

 

  MERRITT MARCHES ON

  Three-time USA outdoor champion LaShawn Merritt led the advance to the final in the men's 400, running 44.36 for the fastest semifinal time. That's just slightly off his season best of 44.32, which leads the U.S. and ranks second in the world. The final is Saturday at 5:30.

 

FASTEST EVER 800 BY COLLEGE FRESHMAN

Stanford's Amy Weissenbach grabbed the last qualifying spot into the finals of the women's 800 being clocked in 2:00.98  which ranks No. 5 on the American junior list, improving upon her previous No. 7 ranking coming into this year from her national high school federation record of 2:02.04 in 2012.

She also broke Tennessee State's Madeline Manning's collegiate freshman record of 2:01.6 set in 1967.

   OH, SO CLOSE

   Gunnar Nixon fell just a quarter of an inch short of matching the meet record for the decathlon high jump. Nixon cleared 7-1 1/2 to pick up 963 points, which moved him into the lead in the overall standings. The meet record was 7-1.75, set by Chris Huffins and former Rock Valley High School and Iowa State star Darwin VandeHoef in 1998.

   Nixon maintained his lead after the 400, the final event of the day, and has 4,449 points at the halfway point in the competition. World record holder and Olympic gold medalist Ashton Eaton is second with 4,405 points. Eaton had the lead until finishing 11th in the high jump, which came after he posted a PR in the shot put (49-2 1/2). Eaton won the opening 100-meter dash (10.48) and also finished first in the 400 (46.89). He's seeking his third straight USA title. 

     

 FAST TIME FOR SHELBY

  Former Sioux City East star Shelby Houlihan ran her fastest time ever in the semifinals of the women's 800. But it still wasn't fast enough to get her to the final. Houlihan, now at Arizona State, logged a time of 2:02.63, which better the 2:03.15 she ran in Thursday's first round. Brenda Martinez had the fastest time in the semis, running 1:59.84.

 

  FORMER IOWA COLLEGIANS ON THE MOVE

  Former Iowa college stars Tyler Mulder (Northern Iowa) and Erik Sowinski (Iowa) reached the final in the men's 800. In a great semifinal race, Mulder and Sowinski ran shoulder to shoulder with Nick Symmonds and Michael Rutt as they charged to the finish. Symmonds won the heat in 1:45.22 and was followed by Mulder (1:45.24), Sowinski (1:45.29) and Rutt (1:45.43). Mulder was an NCAA champion for Northern Iowa. Sowinski won the 800 at the 2013 U.S. Indoor, and set an American record in the indoor 600 earlier this year.

 

 

JUNIOR NATIONALS

OKOLO IS OK

   U.S. junior leader Courtney Okolo will be tough to beat in the finals of the junior women's 400. Okolo, who recently completed her freshman year at Texas, led the qualifiers out of the semifinals with a time of 51.89, a slight improvement over her previous best of 51.96. Okolo ran that time, which was No. 3 on the world junior list, in finishing fourth at the NCAA championships June 7. The No. 2 qualifier for the finals ran a second-and-a-half slower, Breigh Jones of Austin Peay at 53.39.

  

SHE DID IT AGAIN

   Brianna Nerud of Syracuse won the junior women's steeplechase for the second year in a row, running 10:15.67. Nerud finished fifth at the junior world championships last year and has the fourth fastest junior team in the world this year. She's also the all-time U.S. junior leader with her time of 10:00.72 at the junior worlds.

WINKLER MOVES ON HAMMER THROW LIST

Rudy Winkler, who will be a freshman at Cornell, won the men's junior hammer throw (6 kilos) at 245-5 which ranks No. 2 on the all-time United States high school list and No. 3 on the all-time U.S. junior list

SWIFT IOWANS

   Iowa state high school champion Anna Holdiman of Waverly-Shell Rock ran the fastest time in the semifinals for the junior women's 1500. Holidman, a five-time Class 3A state champion in track, won her heat in 4:35.13. She has signed with Iowa State. Griswold's Rebekah Topham, who'll be a junior in the fall, finished second in her heat with the fourth fastest time overall -- 4:40.11. Topham is a five-time Class 1A state champion in track. Holdiman's time will go down at No. 8 on Iowa's all-time list.