R.I.P.--Roger Ebert


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Re: R.I.P.--Roger Ebert

Postby JRM » Thu Apr 04, 2013 12:02 pm

I remember when our family discovered Siskel and Ebert's show on PBS back in the early 80s. I was fun to watch clips of movies before they premiered, and hear their critiques. That was long before "At the Movies" was brought to network television.

An era has ended. Hopefully Gene saved him the aisle seat in the great balcony of the sky.
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Re: R.I.P.--Roger Ebert

Postby Conor Dary » Thu Apr 04, 2013 12:15 pm

That is really sad. An excellent writer.

Back in the 80's and early 90's CU in Boulder use to hold a World Affairs Conference every spring. It was all free, with lots of great speakers, and Ebert came every year, even though he wasn't paid anything, including expenses. He would show a movie on Monday, and the rest of the week spend 2 hours each day, discussing the film. He did Casablanca one year that was a marvelous event that I really enjoyed and learned oodles about the film. And the last one he did was Jonathan Demme's Silence of the Lambs.

A marvelous fellow. However, their influence was perhaps, at times, overestimated. He and Siskel both gave big thumbs up to Prefontaine on their show---which I would watch every week. And the film still only made about $500,000 in total ticket sales.
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Re: R.I.P.--Roger Ebert

Postby mcgato » Thu Apr 04, 2013 1:57 pm

I watched the old PBS Siskel and Ebert show starting in the late '70s. Opened up a whole new world for me. I didn't know that foreign movies could be something that I would enjoy watching, but the way that they spoke about a Fellini film, for instance, made me want to seek them out. Not long after that, the local PBS station started showing foreign films once a week later at night--about 11 pm or so. One of the first that I saw was "The 400 Blows," and I was simply amazed by how phenomenal it was. So different than anything that I had seen before.

I think that their influence on movies in the US is quite substantial. They won't sway the common person who only sees the big blockbusters. A good review from them won't turn a small movie into a huge box office success. But their constant support of quality movies, I think, has helped a lot of people see that there may be more out there than the blockbuster at the multiplex. I think that the independent movie industry would be much poorer if they had not been around.
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Re: R.I.P.--Roger Ebert

Postby jeremyp » Thu Apr 04, 2013 6:39 pm

JRM wrote:I remember when our family discovered Siskel and Ebert's show on PBS back in the early 80s. I was fun to watch clips of movies before they premiered, and hear their critiques. That was long before "At the Movies" was brought to network television.

An era has ended. Hopefully Gene saved him the aisle seat in the great balcony of the sky.

I was an avid watcher until Siskel died, then the magic died as well. It was the disagreements that made the critical opinions interesting. Ebert by himself was like the McCartney without Lennon. Sad that both died of cancer.
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Re: R.I.P.--Roger Ebert

Postby gh » Thu Apr 04, 2013 8:11 pm

I loved the Siskel/Ebert love/hate relationship. Maybe it was in a Playboy interview, but somewhere Siskel said—in all respect—something like "we don't let Roger wear brown sweaters on the show anymore: it looks like a mudslide"
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Re: R.I.P.--Roger Ebert

Postby Conor Dary » Fri Apr 05, 2013 9:43 am

gh wrote:I loved the Siskel/Ebert love/hate relationship. Maybe it was in a Playboy interview, but somewhere Siskel said—in all respect—something like "we don't let Roger wear brown sweaters on the show anymore: it looks like a mudslide"


I remember seeing Ebert walking around the CU campus 20+years ago, looking like some sort of graduate student.
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Re: R.I.P.--Roger Ebert

Postby aaronk » Fri Apr 05, 2013 10:01 am

Two thumbs up.....to a great career!!
Conor Dary wrote:That is really sad. An excellent writer.

Back in the 80's and early 90's CU in Boulder use to hold a World Affairs Conference every spring. It was all free, with lots of great speakers, and Ebert came every year, even though he wasn't paid anything, including expenses. He would show a movie on Monday, and the rest of the week spend 2 hours each day, discussing the film. He did Casablanca one year that was a marvelous event that I really enjoyed and learned oodles about the film. And the last one he did was Jonathan Demme's Silence of the Lambs.

A marvelous fellow. However, their influence was perhaps, at times, overestimated. He and Siskel both gave big thumbs up to Prefontaine on their show---which I would watch every week. And the film still only made about $500,000 in total ticket sales.


About Prefontaine, the movie.
That says more about the (lack of) popularity of track and field in this country....even of an icon like Pre....than it does about the influence (or lack thereof) of Siskel and Ebert!!
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Re: R.I.P.--Roger Ebert

Postby Conor Dary » Fri Apr 05, 2013 10:06 am

aaronk wrote:Two thumbs up.....to a great career!!
Conor Dary wrote:That is really sad. An excellent writer.

Back in the 80's and early 90's CU in Boulder use to hold a World Affairs Conference every spring. It was all free, with lots of great speakers, and Ebert came every year, even though he wasn't paid anything, including expenses. He would show a movie on Monday, and the rest of the week spend 2 hours each day, discussing the film. He did Casablanca one year that was a marvelous event that I really enjoyed and learned oodles about the film. And the last one he did was Jonathan Demme's Silence of the Lambs.

A marvelous fellow. However, their influence was perhaps, at times, overestimated. He and Siskel both gave big thumbs up to Prefontaine on their show---which I would watch every week. And the film still only made about $500,000 in total ticket sales.


About Prefontaine, the movie.
That says more about the (lack of) popularity of track and field in this country....even of an icon like Pre....than it does about the influence (or lack thereof) of Siskel and Ebert!!


That and the fact it was a pretty crappy movie. I think S&E were on Ibogaine when they watched it. Who can forget the clock in 'Hayward' at the end going from 12:36 to 00:00, with the crowd going wild...
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Re: R.I.P.--Roger Ebert

Postby Marlow » Sun Apr 07, 2013 1:47 pm

Ebert was initially pooh-poohed as a plebian reviewer, more likely to recommend a blockbuster than an art house film. Rex Reed, an early 'celebrity' reviewer, had some unkind words that I recall. That's probably why I liked Ebert so much, he was more concerned with entertainment than 'art'! :D
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Re: R.I.P.--Roger Ebert

Postby Conor Dary » Sun Apr 07, 2013 3:53 pm

His Top Ten Movies. Most of them in black and white.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8334-207_162-575 ... -all-time/
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Re: R.I.P.--Roger Ebert

Postby Master Po » Sun Apr 07, 2013 5:33 pm

Conor Dary wrote:His Top Ten Movies. Most of them in black and white.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8334-207_162-575 ... -all-time/


Interesting list. I'm always reluctant to say "greatest" about such lists, but if I call them "favorites," he and I really liked several of the same movies. A couple of I haven't seen (The General, Tokyo Story), and one that I just never liked (2001), though I could say I "appreciated" it as a great movie.
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Re: R.I.P.--Roger Ebert

Postby jeremyp » Tue Apr 09, 2013 1:24 pm

Conor Dary wrote:His Top Ten Movies. Most of them in black and white.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8334-207_162-575 ... -all-time/

I absolutely hated "Aguirre Wrath Of God" as an Art Film the elitists love to chatter about, and I thought "Tree Of Life" might have made top ten in it's year, but all time??? Never.
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