Whiskey question


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Whiskey question

Postby steve » Mon Dec 10, 2012 8:19 pm

I recently purchased a bottle of Chivas Regal Royal 21 Salute. Upon attempting to open it the cork broke in half, with half still stuck in the bottle. Although the remaining cork appears to still have maintained a seal, I am concerned that the bad cork may have allowed the whiskey to spoil. Before I serve it to friends, I was hoping someone would have some answers to my questions. Is it likely spoiled or likely still okay? What are the reasonable concerns I should have? Does whiskey get 'corked' like wine?
Thanks!
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby gh » Mon Dec 10, 2012 8:28 pm

first off, allow me to note that since you're speaking of Chivas, it's a whisky question, not a whiskey question :mrgreen: (Scotch and Canadian members of the family are whisky, Irish and American are whiskey)

Even if the seal were broken, I don't believe anything could happen to the scotch other than over time the alcohol content would drop as it vaporized. (if you've ever seen a liquor inspector come to a bar, they'll run a hygrometer test on old opened bottles and make them chuck them if the alcohol content drops too far below what's advertised)

The original alcohol content of distilled spirits is such that nothing can live in it (hence it's use as a disinfectant), so there's nothing to change the taste.

But to be safe I'd start working on it right away :twisted:
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby steve » Tue Dec 11, 2012 4:45 am

Thanks for the reply (and the education on the spelling :D )!

For years I found whisky (and whiskey for that matter) unpalatable until one evening when a friend insisted that I try some of his Lagavulin. I totally expected to have to suppress a gag and a grimace but was surprised at how much I enjoyed it. Since then I've enjoyed them more and recently really liked the Chivas Regal 12 year (very different from the Lagavulin). I bought the Chivas 21 and I'm really excited to try it. Thanks again gh!
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby catson52 » Tue Dec 11, 2012 5:14 am

Enjoy the stuff. I personally now favor the single malts over the blended. Also there is a big difference in taste between the 12 yr on one side, and the 18-21 yr on the other. A cousin once served me some of a $800 bottle of scotch - can't remember the details now - but I did not find it to be truly remarkable. Personal tastes, I suppose.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby bambam » Tue Dec 11, 2012 7:34 am

Not much of a drinker but at a meeting Scotland in 2010 I ordered a single-malt at dinner one evening, figuring I had to taste this Scottish "delicacy." I asked our waiter to choose a mild one, so that a non-drinker like me would tolerate it well.

Will not be trying that again. No idea how people drink that stuff.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Daisy » Tue Dec 11, 2012 8:17 am

bambam wrote:Will not be trying that again. No idea how people drink that stuff.

There is a huge variety in Scotland, and some I find quite good. But others, often the ones regarded as the best, I cannot stand. Top of the list of undrinkable, for me, is Taliskar. Lagavulin a close second.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby gh » Tue Dec 11, 2012 8:26 am

Talisker and Lagavulin are both from the rather heavily-peated side of things.

For an initiate to the wonderful world of single malts I'd suggest Macallan 12. They use old sherry casks for their kegging, which imparts a nice smoothness to the whole thing. Well, relatively speaking: it is scotch after all!

The difference in smoothness between their 12 and 18 is palpable. Unfortunately, so is the price.

Our group of travelling track junkies regularly wrap up meals with a wee dram of the Mac. The fun part is applying what we call "The Macallan Rule" which is that a shot shouldn't cost more than a dollar per year. Obviously, with inflation that gets tougher every year, and while the 12 hangs in there pretty close, more often than not they're now asking for about $25 for the 18. The key comes in looking at the relative price between the two and figuring which is closest to rule.

(Des Moines, by the way, is a place where you can still find the 12 for single-digit pricing with some frequency; guessing that state liquor-tax laws are much in play)
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Daisy » Tue Dec 11, 2012 8:28 am

Macallan is the one I usually buy. Maybe bambam would like that one?
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Blues » Tue Dec 11, 2012 9:17 am

I've read that a bad cork can cause bourbon to degrade, but I'll defer to the whisky/whiskey experts in the forum on this one, since my high abv poisons of choice are spirits that have less congeners, like high quality vodkas, and occasionally a top shelf silver tequila...

On a related note though, the warehouse for my favorite high end tequila accidentally released a batch of previously quarantined tequila and had to recall it. I was one who was unlucky enough to buy a bottle prior to the recall. The reason for the recall was that the company used cork stoppers in the bottles, and the tequila went bad. When I opened the bottle the cork was slimy, and just drinking a minimal amount caused a headache. In all subsequent batches, the company exclusively used rubber stoppers. The CEO of the company wrote me and said that cork stoppers are really bad for tequila, and that it was the cork that caused the degradation in quality of that batch.

I've seen unopened bottles of other spirits with small amounts of mold on the cork inside the bottle on occasion (including 40% abv rums), and I'd imagine that if mold did get into the bottle or was on the cork to start with, that certain conditions could allow it to grow on the cork and eventually affect the flavor of the beverage.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Pego » Tue Dec 11, 2012 9:19 am

Of Scotch, I prefer Chivas. A friend (supposedly a connoisseur) had me taste some of those fancy ones. They tasted like soap to me.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Conor Dary » Tue Dec 11, 2012 9:27 am

One of the joys of the University of Nottingham back in the 90's was the faculty club about 200 yards from my office. They would make periodical trips to France, where taxes then were much lower, and buy oodles of booze, including single malts. I must have tried 30 or so, and I really like the peaty ones, especially my favorite now, Laphroaig. Add a bit of water, no ice!, and you are good to go.

By the way, a good value whisky is Famous Grouse. I think it is the best of the blended whiskys and quite good.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby gh » Tue Dec 11, 2012 9:44 am

Pego wrote:Of Scotch, I prefer Chivas. A friend (supposedly a connoisseur) had me taste some of those fancy ones. They tasted like soap to me.


Chivas is "fancy" in and of its own right; the difference is that it's a blend rather than a single malt. To me there's a world of difference, and I don't particularly like the blends.

What is really remarkable is the single-barrel bourbons they're turning out now (things like Eagle Rare). They give the scotches a very good run for their money.

Along that line, something else that would blow your mind is a super-high-end tequila, like Barrique

http://www.pocotequila.com/antour/porfidio1b.html

in a blind tasting, it can fool you into thinking you're drinking a fine cognac.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Conor Dary » Tue Dec 11, 2012 9:55 am

Now that cognac is in the discussion, has anyone else tried Calvados, i.e. apple brandy? The best ones, the Hors d'Age's are excellent. When I once stayed with Veronique Marot and Brian Scobie in Leeds, years ago, they introduced me to it.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby gh » Tue Dec 11, 2012 9:57 am

Blues wrote:I....
On a related note though, the warehouse for my favorite high end tequila accidentally released a batch of previously quarantined tequila and had to recall it. I was one who was unlucky enough to buy a bottle prior to the recall. The reason for the recall was that the company used cork stoppers in the bottles, and the tequila went bad. When I opened the bottle the cork was slimy, and just drinking a minimal amount caused a headache. In all subsequent batches, the company exclusively used rubber stoppers. The CEO of the company wrote me and said that cork stoppers are really bad for tequila, and that it was the cork that caused the degradation in quality of that batch....


There's a chemical called TCA (I can't remember what it stands for, altough it does sound like something BALCO would sell :mrgreen: ) that can occur naturally in cork, and if there's enough of it, it indeed can "cork" a wine. I've seen estimates that as much of 10% (or higher) of wine ends up corked, but most people don't notice it. I rarely do.

That's one reason that all the champagne insiders I know store their bubbly standing up, which would seem to be counter to the general wisdom of storing wine on its side because you don't want the cork to dry out. The difference is, with the high pressure inside a bottle of sparkling, the "humidity is always 100%" so the cork stays wet enough even if not contacting the actual liquid. Greatly reduces your loss rate. I've been cellaring mine this way for a decade now, to very good end.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby 26mi235 » Tue Dec 11, 2012 9:59 am

gh wrote:(Des Moines, by the way, is a place where you can still find the 12 for single-digit pricing with some frequency; guessing that state liquor-tax laws are much in play)


A number of liquor taxes are on a per-unit basis (or alcohol content in some cases?), so that a tax on a costly bottle of liquor will not make much of an impact in percentage terms. That might account for the Iowa pricing.

I would guess that the relative usage of pre-mixed beverages across states may be linked to the tax mechanism. For example, if they are taxing liquor at a high rate and mixer at a low rate, it is much cheaper to mix your own...

Fair-trade or fair-competition laws used to have a large impact on the prices of alcohol products. However, these were generally relaxed and more competition altered (lowered) the prices, sometimes significantly. The first non-teaching work I ever did as an economist was to estimate the relative impact of a supermarket chain selling beer/wine and liquor compared to when the fair trade laws were altered (specialty stores were suing supermarket based on their leases in the shopping centers). Turns out virtually all of the effect was due to the change in the law (the supermarket changed a number of months after the law because of the nature of the owners -- can someone figure out which chain given that information? :) ).

The supermarket won the only case that went to trial and settled for a very small amount in the other half dozen cases. I was stunned how easy it was to do the analysis in combination with how difficult it was for the parties to see the effects before the analysis was done. I made what seemed to be a nice little paycheck for a grad student but it was miniscule compared to the amount that the supermarket saved.

One side note of interest, the more detailed analysis required in the one that went to trial turned up evidence that the people running the store were siphoning off from the inventory and got nabbed for it. I do not know if it was the owners or the managers that pushed the case, but if it was the owners, they got their money's worth even if they lost their court case on the competition issue.


Thanks for the interesting insights and commentary; some of these non-running threads are my favorites (e.g., What are you reading, LHC,...).

[I had to submit this three times because of intervening posts while the most recent post on the main board is from 10 hours ago!]
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Pego » Tue Dec 11, 2012 10:20 am

Conor Dary wrote:Now that cognac is in the discussion, has anyone else tried Calvados, i.e. apple brandy? The best ones, the Hors d'Age's are excellent. When I once stayed with Veronique Marot and Brian Scobie in Leeds, years ago, they introduced me to it.


Most Calvados I tried were a bit harsh to my palate but I agree, it is quite drinkable :wink: .
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby tandfman » Tue Dec 11, 2012 6:21 pm

Pego wrote:
Conor Dary wrote:Now that cognac is in the discussion, has anyone else tried Calvados, i.e. apple brandy? The best ones, the Hors d'Age's are excellent. When I once stayed with Veronique Marot and Brian Scobie in Leeds, years ago, they introduced me to it.

Most Calvados I tried were a bit harsh to my palate but I agree, it is quite drinkable :wink: .

It's one of my favorite after-dinner drinks. In fact, you've now inspired me to pour one for myself. Yes, an hors d'age. Yummy.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby tandfman » Tue Dec 11, 2012 6:26 pm

Conor Dary wrote:By the way, a good value whisky is Famous Grouse. I think it is the best of the blended whiskys and quite good.

If you're looking for a reasonably priced blend, try Dewar's.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby gh » Tue Dec 11, 2012 8:48 pm

No idea if it's an idea floated by the manufacturers' themselves, but rumor has it that Grouse is QEII's favorite tipple.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Midnightfeast » Wed Dec 12, 2012 4:38 am

Chivas Regal, in '95 and '96 there was a 10 mile run that started from that distillery in Keith. We changed in one of the distillery's changing rooms at the Strathisla distillery, which is one of the oldest in Scotland. Sadly the event is no longer held. We didn't get any whisky in our goody bags there, but there are two in Speyside (that I know of) where you will get a 12 year old malt in your goody bag. One is The Glenlivet 10k, (without any changing facilities) held in April, based from a hall. The other is the Glen Moray 10K and 10 Mile, which is far more rustic, and is in a warehouse, with stacked whisky barrels demarcating what passes as changing rooms. Most of the expense comes from the bottle, the whisky has not been sold, so there is no tax. At Glen Moray we also got a free nip of whisky after the race, which I would have had only I was driving.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby tandfman » Wed Dec 12, 2012 6:36 am

gh wrote:Talisker and Lagavulin are both from the rather heavily-peated side of things.

For an initiate to the wonderful world of single malts I'd suggest Macallan 12. They use old sherry casks for their kegging, which imparts a nice smoothness to the whole thing. Well, relatively speaking: it is scotch after all!

The difference in smoothness between their 12 and 18 is palpable. Unfortunately, so is the price.

If I'm going for an expensive single-malt, my choice is Balvenie. Like Macallan, it comes in different ages, but I've never had a bad one and the best of them are really, really good.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby bijanc » Wed Dec 12, 2012 9:06 am

Ask John Carlos:


http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/ ... /index.htm

"...Everyone has his favorite Carlos story. There was the night in D�sseldorf when he drank with a local reporter until 3 a.m., then bet him two fifths of Scotch that he would beat Willie Turner in the 200 meters later that day. Carlos did, of course, and he collected his bet in the infield. (Carlos laughs when reminded of this. "Well, my father used to tell me," he says, " 'You can drink all you want as long as you can still go home and hang up your clothes instead of throwing them over a chair.' And I haven't ever gotten that drunk yet.")

Then there was the night after the 1968 San Jose Invitational when Carlos served an unidentified whiskey that was so strong his teammates gagged when they tried it. "If you had ever been in Harlem," he told them, "you would appreciate it. You would know it's good stuff. If you lived where I lived, you would have grown up on it."...'
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Blues » Wed Dec 12, 2012 4:52 pm

tandfman wrote:
gh wrote:Talisker and Lagavulin are both from the rather heavily-peated side of things.

For an initiate to the wonderful world of single malts I'd suggest Macallan 12. They use old sherry casks for their kegging, which imparts a nice smoothness to the whole thing. Well, relatively speaking: it is scotch after all!

The difference in smoothness between their 12 and 18 is palpable. Unfortunately, so is the price.

If I'm going for an expensive single-malt, my choice is Balvenie. Like Macallan, it comes in different ages, but I've never had a bad one and the best of them are really, really good.


I've only tried about 6 or 7 different brands of good Scotch in my lifetime, and none in the super high end range, but of those I've tried I probably liked the taste of Balvenie Doublewood the best. Noticeable headache the next day, but it may have been because I had a little more than I should have...

Spirits that are significantly aged are usually a lot tougher on my body, so I usually stick to a superior vodka on the rocks on the occasions when I choose to drink something hard, and rarely get a headache or queasy stomach from that. The taste of the Balvenie was a really nice change though.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby tandfman » Thu Dec 13, 2012 7:21 am

Blues wrote: I've only tried about 6 or 7 different brands of good Scotch in my lifetime, and none in the super high end range, but of those I've tried I probably liked the taste of Balvenie Doublewood the best. Noticeable headache the next day, but it may have been because I had a little more than I should have...

OK, you inspired me to experiment. I poured myself a generous shot of Balvenie Portwood last night before I went to bed. Slept like a puppy and had no headache this morning.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Blues » Thu Dec 13, 2012 8:51 am

tandfman wrote:
Blues wrote: I've only tried about 6 or 7 different brands of good Scotch in my lifetime, and none in the super high end range, but of those I've tried I probably liked the taste of Balvenie Doublewood the best. Noticeable headache the next day, but it may have been because I had a little more than I should have...

OK, you inspired me to experiment. I poured myself a generous shot of Balvenie Portwood last night before I went to bed. Slept like a puppy and had no headache this morning.


I'm jealous... I'd love to be able to try a Scotch that costs close to $200 a bottle like Portwood, but I haven't had the opportunity to try anything over about $50 a bottle.. The Balvenie Doublewood that I enjoyed costs just over $40 at a Total Wine store here in Arizona.

Also, based on Conor Dary's comment regarding Famous Grouse, I picked up a bottle at my local supermarket for $17 two days ago... Although I don't know that much about Scotch, it had a decent flavor for the price, and caused no headache afterwards... I mixed it about 50/50 with water and enjoyed it. Maybe the lack of headache for me is because the standard Famous Grouse product is only aged up to 6 months, so it probably contains less congeners that are frequently responsible for hangover symptoms than products that are aged much longer. To be fair to aged spirits, I developed a pretty severe allergy to mold after renting a condo for 2 years that turned out to have a bad mold problem, so certain aged spirits tend to affect me more than they'd affect most others.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Wang Lung » Thu Dec 13, 2012 10:20 am

Royal Salute comes in a ceramic jug, not a glass bottle. The relevance is, ceramic is not uniform construction. The cork will not fit as it should under the best circumstances. Even had it removed intact, it would not re-seal properly. There's nothing wrong with the contents, other than it is an engineered product designed solely to offend no one. :wink:
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby tandfman » Thu Dec 13, 2012 7:21 pm

Blues wrote: I'm jealous... I'd love to be able to try a Scotch that costs close to $200 a bottle like Portwood, but I haven't had the opportunity to try anything over about $50 a bottle.. The Balvenie Doublewood that I enjoyed costs just over $40 at a Total Wine store here in Arizona.

If it makes you feel any better, I bought that Portwood at least 10 years ago and IIRC, it cost about $75 at the time. I had tasted it at some kind of business function, thought it was fabulous, and had to get a bottle. Needless to say, even if I drank hard liquor every day (which I don't), that would not be my regular drink. One reason I don't drink much of it is that I really think of it as an after-dinner drink, and I drink it straight up in a small snifter. Apart from the expense, when I do have an after-dinner drink (maybe once or twice a month), I'm usually more inclined to go for some kind of cognac or liqueur (Drambuie, Grand Marnier, Calvados, Cointreau, etc.). It's only on rare occasion that I'll feel like having the Portwood, or a good high-end bourbon

BTW, Doublewood at just over $40 is a bargain. With that price differential, I'm sure that when I run out of Portwood, I'll replace it with a Doublewood. I can't afford a $200 bottle of scotch either.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby gh » Thu Dec 13, 2012 10:04 pm

I can at least claim a track connection with Balvenie. I had never heard of it when Res Brugger, the legendary longtime director of Zürich's Weltklasse, gave me a bottle as a present. (yeah-yeah, I know, name-drop, name drop)

I've tried the Portwood, and while it's an OK tipple, the Doublewood is very signifcant bang for the buck.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Blues » Thu Dec 20, 2012 7:22 pm

Conor Dary wrote:One of the joys of the University of Nottingham back in the 90's was the faculty club about 200 yards from my office. They would make periodical trips to France, where taxes then were much lower, and buy oodles of booze, including single malts. I must have tried 30 or so, and I really like the peaty ones, especially my favorite now, Laphroaig. Add a bit of water, no ice!, and you are good to go.

By the way, a good value whisky is Famous Grouse. I think it is the best of the blended whiskys and quite good.


To update, I mentioned before that I tried the standard Famous Grouse recently ($17.99 at my local market), and now I prefer to sip it straight. It seems to be a little sweeter than other Scotch whiskies I've tried (and I usually avoid sweets), and that may turn some scotch drinkers off, but there's very little burn if any, and there's less potential for hangover compared to whiskies that are aged longer. The flavor isn't as complex as say a Doublewood, but the flavor is good and I like this stuff. Other than the unique flavor that makes scotch taste like scotch, this almost tastes like an across the pond distant cousin of one of my favorite Dominican rums, Ron Matusalem, although the Famous Grouse sweetness is a little more subdued... That probably sounds really nasty to Scotch connoisseurs, but I kind of like the unique slight butterscotch/caramel aftertaste that I sense in both... All things considered, I think it's a very good product for the price, and I'm grateful to Conor Dary for the info.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby gh » Thu Dec 20, 2012 8:40 pm

Among good "starter" scotches, I'd also suggest Highland Park, which despite the lack of sounds-like-your-spitting Gaelic name, is actually a first-rate single malt, not the Costco house brand.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Wang Lung » Thu Dec 20, 2012 10:54 pm

Blues, if you like Famous Grouse, there are other Grouses available. Snow Grouse, Black Grouse, and the generally recognized favorite, Naked Grouse. Pick up a bottle of that to try. Or not, and just do the wise thing financially, and stay with what you like for $17.99. :)
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Blues » Fri Dec 21, 2012 9:46 am

gh wrote:Among good "starter" scotches, I'd also suggest Highland Park, which despite the lack of sounds-like-your-spitting Gaelic name, is actually a first-rate single malt, not the Costco house brand.



That was the name of the town in crowded northern NJ adjacent to my college dorm. My imagined vision of a beverage called Highland Park would be a budget friendly bottle of locally brewed industrial strength malt liquor routinely served in New Brunswick, NJ pubs and frats to frustrated, over 21 Rutgers sports fans.. "Yo, bartender! We just choked again in the biggest game of the season for the third time in a row, and our QB just threw six interceptions.. I gotta chug me a friggin' Highland Park, fast..." :wink:

If I come across the real Highland Park I'll try it though. I just saw that Highland Park single malt is one of the major ingredients of the Grouse blends.. Thanks.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Wang Lung » Fri Dec 21, 2012 9:57 pm

HP12 is a great whisky. Must pour me a glass right...now.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Bowbridge » Sat Dec 22, 2012 8:31 am

The Famous Grouse was also Katharine Hepburn's Scotch of choice. Laphroig Quarter Cask is an interesting one for the not faint of heart. One of the ones at the top of my list is Aberlour 10 year. The Yamazaki is another good one to try. Actually, they are all good ones to try, so bend an elbow.

An aside: the liquor store owner down the street told me that the Chinese are big into Champagne (and Scotch), and bought 500,000 cases of Moet and basically the whole output of one of the Scotch distilleries this year (can't think of which one he mentioned),

Quick Poll:
a) Neat
b) Straight Up
c) On the Rocks
d) With Soda or Water

I go Neat with the special occasion Scotches (anything 18 years or older), and the high end stuff like Johnnie Walker Blue, and with Soda on the Rocks with anything else.

Latest projects are Everclear 190 proof in Apple Pie Moonshine (it's in the fridge aging), and finding where I can get a few bottles of JTS Brown Bourbon (no luck here in New York or in New Jersey).
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby gh » Sat Dec 22, 2012 9:14 am

for me, Neat is the only way to go.

I just recently had the first scotch & soda of my life.... gack!!!! What a waste of good scotch (and good soda too, come to think of it).
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Conor Dary » Sat Dec 22, 2012 9:31 am

gh wrote:for me, Neat is the only way to go.

I just recently had the first scotch & soda of my life.... gack!!!! What a waste of good scotch (and good soda too, come to think of it).


Good grief, yes. Or maybe with a little water like the Scots do. But no ice!

I might have told this story before, but my brother's wife's cousin lives in Surrey--next door to Eric Clapton, I might add. The first time they visited a few years ago, the cousin, a barrister, asks my brother if he wants a Scotch, which of course he said yes. Whereupon the cousin asks if he wants some ice. My brother knew enough to say no, neat was fine. And the cousin brought in an superb 18 year or so Scotch, and told my brother that if he had wanted ice he would have just served some plunk, like Johnnie Walker Red.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Bowbridge » Sat Dec 22, 2012 10:01 am

Johnnie Red might not be up to the standards of say, The Macallan, but it's certainly not in the in the class of Bud Light or one of those infernal brews. And if you don't want to go broke drinking in the bars here in New York, you can't be too choosy. I was drinking in a bar down near Wall Street a few years ago and asked the barkeep how much a shot of Johnnie Blue was - $45. Does anyone order it? She said yeah, a lot of the Wall Street 30 somethings that want to act like big shots, they start knocking back shots of the stuff. After about 3, she said she starts downpouring. Now, I'm all in favor of honesty, but in this case, these rubes deserved what they got.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby tandfman » Sat Dec 22, 2012 6:05 pm

Bowbridge wrote:Quick Poll:
a) Neat
b) Straight Up
c) On the Rocks
d) With Soda or Water

When I drink Scotch before dinner, I usually drink a blend (Chivas or Dewar's) and I'll have it on the rocks. When I drink Scotch after dinner, it will always be a single malt, and I drink it neat.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby Blues » Sat Dec 22, 2012 6:29 pm

If it wasn't for Bowbridge's poll, I'd still be under the impression that straight up meant neat. :oops:

Until recently, on the rare occasions when I drank a Scotch whisky, I always had it on the rocks, which is probably why I only drank it on rare occasions... If a Scotch whisky tastes bad neat, I'll drink something different now. Neat or bust for me.
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Re: Whiskey question

Postby tandfman » Sat Dec 22, 2012 6:42 pm

Blues wrote:If it wasn't for Bowbridge's poll, I'd still be under the impression that straight up meant neat. :oops:

Me, too. I've just learned the difference.

http://cocktails.about.com/b/2007/05/31 ... ght-up.htm

(Part of my ignorance is undoubtedly due to the fact that I'm basically a wine drinker. I have a well-stocked bar, but I rarely drink hard liquor.)
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