more trivia


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more trivia

Postby no one » Fri Oct 19, 2012 8:27 am

who was the “brand-new funky President”?

no cheating or your grade will suffer
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Re: more trivia

Postby Marlow » Fri Oct 19, 2012 8:54 am

Bill Clinton, with his boxers/briefs revelation and soul-sucking sax solo?
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Re: more trivia

Postby no one » Fri Oct 19, 2012 10:28 am

makes sense ... but no .. cigar
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Re: more trivia

Postby no one » Sat Oct 20, 2012 12:28 pm

okay okay okay - I'll give in to the pressure being exerted here - to disclose the mystery answer.

The " brand new funky President" was a phrase coined by ........... in a song. The song's title was meant to refer to U.S. President Gerald Ford, who had succeeded Richard Nixon in the White House.

The song recorded by (drum roll) James Brown. Yes that James Brown, who was a die hard Republican and equally enamored with Richard Nixon.

When Nixon left office ... we (the US citizenry) had a "brand new funky president", whom James Brown was rallying support for - to make changes, etc.

Irony, as conjured by me:

James Brown - a dancer of some note and skill.
Gerald Ford - well Chevy Chase earned a living imitating Ford's 'motation' efforts.

glad to contribute to the knowledge base - news you can use 8-)
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Re: more trivia

Postby bambam » Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:42 pm

no one wrote:James Brown - a dancer of some note and skill.
Gerald Ford - well Chevy Chase earned a living imitating Ford's 'motation' efforts.


Although ironically Ford was probably the most talented athlete of any American President. Pretty good football player at Michigan and had some feelers from the early NFL, but turned for law school.
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Re: more trivia

Postby KDFINE » Sat Oct 20, 2012 5:00 pm

I don't get it. I always thought "Historical" was for non-current events track and field. Are there hints from Clinton,Brown, Ford, and Nixon that are supposed to lead us to some T&F figure from the past?
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Re: more trivia

Postby lonewolf » Sat Oct 20, 2012 8:24 pm

I have never been under the impression that Historical was intended for only T&F topics. Most Historical threads do have a sports related title but many/most tend to branch off in divers directions.
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Re: more trivia

Postby Olli » Sat Oct 20, 2012 10:40 pm

This is the first commandment of Historical Forum Guidelines:

1. This is an historical track & field[ forum and posts should be restricted to that subject: track & field happenings from the past. Current-events material has its own forum, as do "Things Not Track & Field" (most of the time) and "The Trading Post." The guidelines for those forums are posted there. If the mods think a thread is in the wrong forum, they will simply move it (or eliminate it).

It seems the mods have not done their job in this case.

(By the way, as a non-native English speaker, I don't understand why it says "an historical" instead of "a historical". Isn't h pronounced as a consonant here?)
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Re: more trivia

Postby lonewolf » Sat Oct 20, 2012 10:45 pm

Your are correct, olli. I guess if I ever read the fine print I forgot . :oops:
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Re: more trivia

Postby tandfman » Sun Oct 21, 2012 5:02 am

Olli wrote:(By the way, as a non-native English speaker, I don't understand why it says "an historical" instead of "a historical". Isn't h pronounced as a consonant here?)

Here's an comment purporting to summarise the British view of this:

http://www.writing-skills.com/resources ... ing-with-h

Wilson Follett, who is my preferred resource on American usage, likes "an historical" and so do I. (And apparently, so does gh).
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Re: more trivia

Postby gh » Sun Oct 21, 2012 5:40 am

Olli wrote:This is the first commandment of Historical Forum Guidelines:

1. This is an historical track & field[ forum and posts should be restricted to that subject: track & field happenings from the past. Current-events material has its own forum, as do "Things Not Track & Field" (most of the time) and "The Trading Post." The guidelines for those forums are posted there. If the mods think a thread is in the wrong forum, they will simply move it (or eliminate it)....


You don't even need to drill that deep. On the title page for the forums there is a brief description of each, including

<<Historical
Forum devoted to track & field items of an historical nature.>>
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Re: more trivia

Postby Pego » Sun Oct 21, 2012 6:49 am

Here is another non-native English speaker. I have seen "an historical" many times, I know it is a preferred way, but never understood why. Why?
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Re: more trivia

Postby KDFINE » Sun Oct 21, 2012 7:15 am

I guess I need more brain food. Why did I think this was on the historical thread where I see this morning that it is on the "Things Not T&F"?
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Re: more trivia

Postby Marlow » Sun Oct 21, 2012 7:28 am

Pego wrote:Here is another non-native English speaker. I have seen "an historical" many times, I know it is a preferred way, but never understood why. Why?

Because the h was originally unaspirated, leaving a vowel sound. (think of Cockneys dropping their 'aitches')
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Re: more trivia

Postby Conor Dary » Sun Oct 21, 2012 7:55 am

Marlow wrote:
Pego wrote:Here is another non-native English speaker. I have seen "an historical" many times, I know it is a preferred way, but never understood why. Why?

Because the h was originally unaspirated, leaving a vowel sound. (think of Cockneys dropping their 'aitches')


Perhaps. But that doesn't explain why it is 'a history lesson'.
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Re: more trivia

Postby Pego » Sun Oct 21, 2012 8:30 am

Marlow wrote:
Pego wrote:Here is another non-native English speaker. I have seen "an historical" many times, I know it is a preferred way, but never understood why. Why?

Because the h was originally unaspirated, leaving a vowel sound. (think of Cockneys dropping their 'aitches')


I thought something like this would be the answer, but...We pronounce the "H" now. Why is the archaic use of an article still "preferred?" Language evolves after all, or so I've been told :wink: .
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Re: more trivia

Postby Marlow » Sun Oct 21, 2012 8:36 am

Pego wrote:We pronounce the "H" now. Why is the archaic use of an article still "preferred?" Language evolves after all, or so I've been told :wink:

Because pedants retard that evolution with 'rules'. :wink:
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Re: more trivia

Postby gh » Sun Oct 21, 2012 8:42 am

But it's not archaic; it's the completely proper way to say it compared to the proper way.

Just as anybody who speaks the language at the most refined level pronounces "what" as hwat, not wot. Early in the evolution of written English spelling (and nobody knows why) went from hw to wh, but without any change in the pronunciation. But I'm sure they no longer teach that to kids.
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Re: more trivia

Postby lonewolf » Sun Oct 21, 2012 8:43 am

Conor Dary wrote:
Marlow wrote:
Pego wrote:Here is another non-native English speaker. I have seen "an historical" many times, I know it is a preferred way, but never understood why. Why?

Because the h was originally unaspirated, leaving a vowel sound. (think of Cockneys dropping their 'aitches')


Perhaps. But that doesn't explain why it is 'a history lesson'.


I am certainly not a grammarian but I assume that is because it is a lesson.. history is an adjective.
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Re: more trivia

Postby Marlow » Sun Oct 21, 2012 9:27 am

gh wrote:Just as anybody who speaks the language at the most refined level pronounces "what" as hwat, not wot.

And by 'refined', you mean 'the most elitist snobs, as they affect their airs'. Having been born and bred into the most Mayflower-descended circles of New England, I can attest that no one I knew, except those I just described, said 'hwat'.
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Re: more trivia

Postby tandfman » Sun Oct 21, 2012 9:34 am

gh wrote:Just as anybody who speaks the language at the most refined level pronounces "what" as hwat, not wot.

Do you know anybody who routinely says hwat, hwere and hwy?
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Re: more trivia

Postby gh » Sun Oct 21, 2012 9:52 am

I've always said them that way.
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Re: more trivia

Postby gh » Sun Oct 21, 2012 9:58 am

Merriam-Webster's listing: <<\ˈhwät, ˈhwət, ˈwät, ˈwət\>>

Wiki talks about the "wine-whine" merger. I certainly pronounce those two words distinctly differently.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonological_history_of_wh
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Re: more trivia

Postby gm » Sun Oct 21, 2012 10:09 am

tandfman wrote:
gh wrote:Just as anybody who speaks the language at the most refined level pronounces "what" as hwat, not wot.

Do you know anybody who routinely says hwat, hwere and hwy?


Stewie Griffin
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Re: more trivia

Postby Marlow » Sun Oct 21, 2012 10:29 am

gh wrote:I certainly pronounce those two words distinctly differently.

Then that is more a 'regionalism' than a 'preferred' way to say it. The aristocracy of Martha's Vineyard and the Hamptons do indeed have an odd way of pronouncing things, but I'd hardly hold that up as the way NORMAL people would or should say things!
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Re: more trivia

Postby lonewolf » Sun Oct 21, 2012 2:24 pm

Hmm? I am more redneck than aristocrat and I pronounce wine and whine differently. In fact, on introspection I pronounce all wh-words with the wh.... but not hw.
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Re: more trivia

Postby Marlow » Sun Oct 21, 2012 2:54 pm

lonewolf wrote:I am more redneck than aristocrat and I pronounce wine and whine differently.

Quod Erat Demonstrandum!! :D
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Re: more trivia

Postby bambam » Sun Oct 21, 2012 5:01 pm

gh wrote:I've always said them that way.


What happened to the funky president thread?
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Re: more trivia

Postby Marlow » Sun Oct 21, 2012 5:02 pm

bambam wrote:
gh wrote:I've always said them that way.

What happened to the funky president thread?

Jeez, bambam, keep up, bro! :twisted:
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Re: more trivia

Postby bambam » Sun Oct 21, 2012 5:03 pm

gh wrote:I've always said them that way.


You don't count. You're Canadian, eh?
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Re: more trivia

Postby gh » Sun Oct 21, 2012 5:05 pm

I got the boot from a junior high geometry class when we were introduced to proofs for the first time and the teacher put QED at the end and asked if anybody knew what it meant. I put up my hand and said "quite easily done!"

Before I left the room I said "how about quod erat demonstrandum" and he relented.

Blame my father, who had taught me both versions at an earlier point in life, even though he was probably the worst Latin student in the history of the planet. Well at least to that point, where I quirky surpassed his ineptitude. Amo, amas, amat this!
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Re: more trivia

Postby Marlow » Sun Oct 21, 2012 5:38 pm

gh wrote:Blame my father, who had taught me both versions at an earlier point in life, even though he was probably the worst Latin student in the history of the planet. Well at least to that point, where I quirky surpassed his ineptitude. Amo, amas, amat this!

I too was not the best Latin student EVER, but between my 2 years taking it and my 1-semester Etymology class, I found myself with a better than average knowledge of English, which is, I'm sure, why I pursued a Master's in it, after hardly taking any Language/Lit courses in college!
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Re: more trivia

Postby Pego » Mon Oct 22, 2012 4:30 am

My high school teacher of Latin (a defrocked Catholic priest) had us memorize long passages of the Latin poetry. To this day I could recite passages from Ovid's Aurea prima with only a faint idea of what it means :mrgreen: .
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Re: more trivia

Postby Anthony Treacher » Mon Oct 22, 2012 4:56 am

gh wrote:I got the boot from a junior high geometry class when we were introduced to proofs for the first time and the teacher put QED at the end and asked if anybody knew what it meant. I put up my hand and said "quite easily done!"

Before I left the room I said "how about quod erat demonstrandum" and he relented.

Blame my father, who had taught me both versions at an earlier point in life, even though he was probably the worst Latin student in the history of the planet. Well at least to that point, where I quirky surpassed his ineptitude. Amo, amas, amat this!

Reminds of my Maths teacher 'Shell' Foster, King Edward VI Grammar School, Totnes around 1953 : “We are now approaching Euclid’s Theorem – Pons Asinorum - the Bridge of the Asses. Some of you will pass over that Bridge. Some of you” and I swear he looked directly at me, “Some of you, will not.”
Last edited by Anthony Treacher on Mon Oct 22, 2012 6:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: more trivia

Postby Anthony Treacher » Mon Oct 22, 2012 5:10 am

More on topic as to Latin. Our Latin teacher taught us to apply a rule:

“If no supine stem’s the snag
Add ‘fore ut ‘
and it’s in the bag.”

Get it?
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Re: more trivia

Postby tandfman » Mon Oct 22, 2012 5:40 am

There was a day when Latin was widely taught in US high schools. It was almost expected that a well-educated person would have studied Latin at some point. I never did take Latin (although my parents did). Is Latin taught in many high schools these days? Does anyone take it? (I'm excluding Catholic parochial schools from this inquiry--I assume they still teach Latin.)
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Re: more trivia

Postby gh » Mon Oct 22, 2012 6:24 am

doggerel my father brought up when I embarked on my first two years of Latin:

Latin is a dead-dead language
As dead as dead can be
It killed off all the Romans
And now it's killing me
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Re: more trivia

Postby dukehjsteve » Mon Oct 22, 2012 6:37 am

Veni, vidi, vici.
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Re: more trivia

Postby Marlow » Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:44 am

tandfman wrote:Is Latin taught in many high schools these days?

Yes, most.
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Re: more trivia

Postby bambam » Mon Oct 22, 2012 11:54 am

Marlow wrote:
tandfman wrote:Is Latin taught in many high schools these days?

Yes, most.


Why? Doctors used to "need" it but most med students even from my era (early 80s) did not take it.
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