Writing: the long and the short of it


A place for the discussion of all things not closely related to the sport and its competitive side. (as always, locked for the duration of major international championship)

Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby kuha » Tue Oct 16, 2012 1:44 pm

Two rather different pieces on a related subject:

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/20 ... opinion?hp

and:

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/20 ... les-davis/

(I'm partial to the second)
kuha
 
Posts: 9031
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: 3rd row, on the finish line

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Marlow » Tue Oct 16, 2012 5:46 pm

This is what a certain Elizabethan playwright had to say on the subject (in a little number called Hamlet).

BillyS wrote:Therefore, since brevity is the soul of wit,
And tediousness the limbs and outward flourishes,
I will be brief: your noble son is mad


Despite his 'apparent' prolixity, the dude was surprisingly succinct in his language. Has there ever been a better purveyor of prose or verse?
Marlow
 
Posts: 21121
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:00 pm
Location: Somewhere over the . . . hill

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Daisy » Tue Oct 16, 2012 7:49 pm

kuha wrote:(I'm partial to the second)

The advantage of the second is there is more room for pictures.
Daisy
 
Posts: 13153
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Marlow » Wed Oct 17, 2012 7:50 am

Daisy wrote:
kuha wrote:(I'm partial to the second)

The advantage of the second is there is more room for pictures.

My school is exploring eBooks and I'm fascinated with my discovery that eTextBook pages are hyper-textually interactive. Click on a word and you see a picture of it (or something equally as interesting: map, original text, sidebar articles, etc).
Marlow
 
Posts: 21121
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:00 pm
Location: Somewhere over the . . . hill

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby kuha » Wed Oct 17, 2012 7:54 am

Marlow wrote:This is what a certain Elizabethan playwright had to say on the subject (in a little number called Hamlet)


Yes, very apt--and I totally agree with the sentiment. The larger point is that powerful and memorable ideas also can be expressed in other ways.
kuha
 
Posts: 9031
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: 3rd row, on the finish line

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby tandfman » Wed Oct 17, 2012 12:53 pm

The effectiveness of expression is a paramount consideration in non-fiction writing. Terseness is often better than prolixity when you are trying to express an idea. But fiction is, or should be, more than just story telling. Florid writing can be, as that first article points out, beautiful and even exciting if it's good.

The purely aesthetic element of writing is important and should not be ignored.
tandfman
 
Posts: 15043
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Marlow » Wed Oct 17, 2012 1:00 pm

tandfman wrote: Florid writing can be, as that first article points out, beautiful and even exciting if it's good.

'Florid Writing'?
Ah yes, also called Pule Prose. to wit, a rceent award winner:

"When he heard about the empurpled contest on Query Tracker, the coils of dark, multitudinous hair which made up his eyebrows knit together in fury, like a spry grandmother’s knitting needles, clicking incessantly and rapidly, the sun’s rays illuminating them with a silver gleam, like the gleam of a young child’s brand new bicycle bedecked in all its glory with lemon-colored streamers and chiffon paint with stripes of lavender that shimmered like the violet hue of his eyes which were now thoughtful; the wrinkles around his wide, pupil-inhabited orbs seemed pensive as he considered how he might win Query Tracker’s contest and emerge a champion like a magnificent Olympic sports-star—but not like Greg Luganis because he hit his head—instead his own powerful kind of win—the kind to fill a man’s soul with joy to overflowing like a large bowl of Rocky Road ice cream with ostentatious helpings of steaming hot fudge, but not butterscotch because it would contrast with the rich hues of the chocolate which was so sweet as would be his joy when he won—like a bareback rider in the National Rodeo Finals hanging on for dear life to a fraying strap of yellowed rope—he imagined this with fervor, gripping the gleaming pen in his hand as he began to write."


http://querytracker.blogspot.com/2009/0 ... nners.html

:D
Marlow
 
Posts: 21121
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:00 pm
Location: Somewhere over the . . . hill

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby lonewolf » Wed Oct 17, 2012 1:03 pm

Too much of a good thing.
lonewolf
 
Posts: 8815
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Indian Territory

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby 26mi235 » Thu Oct 18, 2012 11:22 pm

From a little after two oclock until almost sundown of the long still hot weary dead September afternoon they sat in what Miss Coldfield still called the office because her father had called it that--a dim hot airless room with the blinds all closed and fastened for forty-three summers because when she was a girl someone had believed that light and moving air carried heat and that dark was always cooler, and which (as the sun shone fuller and fuller on that side of the house) became latticed with yellow slashes full of dust motes which Quentin thought of as being flecks of the dead old dried paint itself blown inward from the scaling blinds as wind might have blown them. There was a wisteria vine blooming for the second time that summer on a wooden trellis before one window, into which sparrows came now and then in random gusts, making a dry vivid dusty sound before going away: and opposite Quentin, Miss Coldfield in the eternal black which she had worn for forty-three years now, whether for sister, father, or nothusband none knew, sitting so bolt upright in the straight hard chair that was so tall for her that her legs hung straight and rigid as if she had iron shinbones and ankles, clear of the floor with that air of impotent and static rage like children's feet, and talking in that grim haggard amazed voice until at last listening would renege and hearing-sense self-confound and the long-dead object of her impotent yet indomitable frustration would appear, as though by outraged recapitulation evoked, quite inattentive and harmless, out of the biding and dreamy and victorious dust.
26mi235
 
Posts: 16333
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Madison, WI

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Marlow » Fri Oct 19, 2012 4:37 am

Hemingway, the model of terse prose, didn't win the Nobel for nuttin!
Of course, so did the overly ornate Faulkner.
Steinbeck - straightforward
TS Eliot - allusively obscure to the max

Writing is a picture window into the psyche. Fiction is autobiographical to the extreme.

I like this:

JKonrad in HoD wrote:It was the stillness of an implacable force brooding over an inscrutable intention.


and this:

Hemingway in HLWE wrote:They sat down at the table and the girl looked across at the hills on the dry side of the valley and the man looked at her and at the table.
"You've got to realize," he said, "that I don't want you to do it if you don't want to. I'm perfectly willing to go through with it if it means anything to you."
"Doesn't it mean anything to you? We could get along."
"Of course it does. But I don't want anybody but you. I don't want any one else. And I know it's perfectly simple."
"Yes, you know it's perfectly simple." "It's all right for you to say that, but I do know it."
"Would you do something for me now?'
"I'd do anything for you.'
"Would you please please please please please please please Stop talking."
He did not say anything but looked at the bags against the wall of the station. There were labels on them from all the hotels where they had spent nights.
Marlow
 
Posts: 21121
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:00 pm
Location: Somewhere over the . . . hill

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby kuha » Fri Oct 19, 2012 6:28 am

Marlow wrote:Hemingway, the model of terse prose, didn't win the Nobel for nuttin!
Of course, so did the overly ornate Faulkner.


And that's the whole point!
kuha
 
Posts: 9031
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: 3rd row, on the finish line

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Marlow » Fri Oct 19, 2012 7:34 am

kuha wrote:
Marlow wrote:Hemingway, the model of terse prose, didn't win the Nobel for nuttin!
Of course, so did the overly ornate Faulkner.

And that's the whole point!

Yup.
Marlow
 
Posts: 21121
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:00 pm
Location: Somewhere over the . . . hill

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby bambam » Fri Oct 19, 2012 3:49 pm

My favorite Hemingway line: "In the fall the war was still there, but we did not go to it anymore."
bambam
 
Posts: 3848
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Durham, NC

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby bambam » Fri Oct 19, 2012 3:49 pm

Or this from James Joyce: "Snow was general all over Ireland."
bambam
 
Posts: 3848
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Durham, NC

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Marlow » Fri Oct 19, 2012 7:07 pm

Greatest novel EVER!

Part I
It was a dark and stormy night. Suddenly, a shot rang out! A door slammed. The maid screamed. Suddenly, a pirate ship appeared on the horizon! While millions of people were starving, the king lived in luxury. Meanwhile, on a small farm in Kansas, a boy was growing up.

Part II
A light snow was falling, and the little girl with the tattered shawl had not sold a violet all day. At that very moment, a young intern at City Hospital was making an important discovery. The mysterious patient in Room 213 had finally awakened. She moaned softly. Could it be that she was the sister of the boy in Kansas who loved the girl with the tattered shawl who was the daughter of the maid who had escaped from the pirates? The intern frowned.
“Stampede!” the foreman shouted, and forty thousand head of cattle thundered down on the tiny camp. The two men rolled on the ground grappling beneath the murderous hooves. A left and a right. A left. Another left and right. An uppercut to the jaw. The fight was over. And so the ranch was saved. The young intern sat by himself in one corner of the coffee shop. He had learned about medicine, but more importantly, he had learned something about life.

THE END


compliments of Snoopy by Charles Schulz
Marlow
 
Posts: 21121
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:00 pm
Location: Somewhere over the . . . hill

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby lonewolf » Fri Oct 19, 2012 7:27 pm

I can't believe I read the whole thing. :?
lonewolf
 
Posts: 8815
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Indian Territory

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Per Andersen » Fri Oct 19, 2012 10:45 pm

bambam wrote:Or this from James Joyce: "Snow was general all over Ireland."

And a few lines later: "Snow falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of their last end, upon all the living and the dead."
Per Andersen
 
Posts: 3737
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby aaronk » Sat Oct 20, 2012 2:49 am

Don't know if this fits this thread's theme, but here's two "Beat"-type evocations of "the quiet lives of desperate men".

From Allen Ginsberg ("First Thought, Best Thought"):

I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked,
dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix,
angelheaded hipsters burning for the ancient heavenly connection to the starry dynamo in the machinery of night,
who poverty and tatters and hollow-eyed and high sat up smoking in the supernatural darkness of cold-water flats floating across the tops of cities contemplating jazz......"

From Bob Dylan ("And if my thought-dreams could be seen, they'd probably put my head in a guillotine...."):

"Ain't it just like the night to play tricks when you're trying to be so quiet?
We sit here stranded, though we're all doing our best to deny it.
And Louise holds a handful of rain, tempting you to defy it.
Lights flicker from the opposite loft.
In this room the heat pipes just cough.
The country music station plays soft.
But there's nothing, really nothing to turn off.
Just Louise and her lover so entwined.
And these visions of Johanna that conquer my mind."
aaronk
 
Posts: 3359
Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 9:39 am

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Master Po » Sat Oct 20, 2012 5:09 am

Per Andersen wrote:
bambam wrote:Or this from James Joyce: "Snow was general all over Ireland."

And a few lines later: "Snow falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of their last end, upon all the living and the dead."


Trying to say what might be one's favorite sentence in all the literature one has ever read or heard is an impossibility of course, but this sentence by Joyce would be near the top of the list for me. (And, thanks for reminding me of it -- hadn't read this story or thought of this in a long time.)
Master Po
 
Posts: 2640
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: north coast USA

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Marlow » Sat Oct 20, 2012 6:08 am

Master Po wrote:Trying to say what might be one's favorite sentence in all the literature

Since literature includes poetry (now the dam is broken!), nothing tops this for me:

WallaceStevens wrote:Let be be finale of seem.
The only emperor is the emperor of ice-cream.
Marlow
 
Posts: 21121
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:00 pm
Location: Somewhere over the . . . hill

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Conor Dary » Sat Oct 20, 2012 6:51 am

Per Andersen wrote:
bambam wrote:Or this from James Joyce: "Snow was general all over Ireland."

And a few lines later: "Snow falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of their last end, upon all the living and the dead."


Yes, the greatest short story ever.
Conor Dary
 
Posts: 6297
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: कनोर दारी in Ronald MacDonald's Home Town, and once a Duck always a Duck.

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Marlow » Sat Oct 20, 2012 7:00 am

Conor Dary wrote:
Per Andersen wrote:
bambam wrote:Or this from James Joyce: "Snow was general all over Ireland."

And a few lines later: "Snow falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of their last end, upon all the living and the dead."

Yes, the greatest short story ever.

We Hemingway fans would demur. I have never read anything more nuanced and 'true' than Hills Like White Elephants (excerpted above).
Marlow
 
Posts: 21121
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:00 pm
Location: Somewhere over the . . . hill

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby tandfman » Sat Oct 20, 2012 7:02 am

Has anyone ever started a novel more effectively than Dickens, when he wrote the first lines of A Tale of Two Cities ?
tandfman
 
Posts: 15043
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Conor Dary » Sat Oct 20, 2012 7:25 am

Certainly up there and as quoted as the beginning of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina:

Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.

I also think, though it is a play, the beginning of Richard III is a masterpiece.

Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this sun of York;
And all the clouds that lour'd upon our house
In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.
Conor Dary
 
Posts: 6297
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: कनोर दारी in Ronald MacDonald's Home Town, and once a Duck always a Duck.

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby bambam » Sat Oct 20, 2012 10:50 am

tandfman wrote:Has anyone ever started a novel more effectively than Dickens, when he wrote the first lines of A Tale of Two Cities ?


From Cheers - Frazier trying to teach them class by reading from great books:

Frazier: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times
Norm: Well, wait a minute, which one was it?
Frazier (scornful look - goes on): , it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way – in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.
Cliff: Boy, this Dickens guy sure knows how to cover his butt!
bambam
 
Posts: 3848
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Durham, NC

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby bambam » Sat Oct 20, 2012 10:51 am

Although the Joyce stuff is great from The Dead, how about the opening paragraphs of Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis:

THE TOWERS of Zenith aspired above the morning mist; austere towers of steel and cement and limestone, sturdy as cliffs and delicate as silver rods. They were neither citadels nor churches, but frankly and beautifully office-buildings.

The mist took pity on the fretted structures of earlier generations: the Post Office with its shingle-tortured mansard, the red brick minarets of hulking old houses, factories with stingy and sooted windows, wooden tenements colored like mud. The city was full of such grotesqueries, but the clean towers were thrusting them from the business center, and on the farther hills were shining new houses, homes—they seemed—for laughter and tranquility.
bambam
 
Posts: 3848
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Durham, NC

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby bambam » Sat Oct 20, 2012 10:53 am

Marlow wrote:
Conor Dary wrote:
Per Andersen wrote:
bambam wrote:Or this from James Joyce: "Snow was general all over Ireland."

And a few lines later: "Snow falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of their last end, upon all the living and the dead."

Yes, the greatest short story ever.

We Hemingway fans would demur. I have never read anything more nuanced and 'true' than Hills Like White Elephants (excerpted above).


As another Hemingway fan, I prefer Snows of Kilimanjaro, or longer, The Sun Also Rises
bambam
 
Posts: 3848
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Durham, NC

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Marlow » Sat Oct 20, 2012 11:05 am

tandfman wrote:Has anyone ever started a novel more effectively than Dickens, when he wrote the first lines of A Tale of Two Cities ?

I'm completely biased, but this, very near the beginning, always gets to me:

Marlow wrote:The sea-reach of the Thames stretched before us like the beginning of an interminable waterway. In the offing the sea and the sky were welded together without a joint, and in the luminous space the tanned sails of the barges drifting up with the tide seemed to stand still in red clusters of canvas sharply peaked, with gleams of varnished sprits. A haze rested on the low shores that ran out to sea in vanishing flatness. The air was dark above Gravesend, and farther back still seemed condensed into a mournful gloom, brooding motionless over the biggest, and the greatest, town on earth.
Marlow
 
Posts: 21121
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:00 pm
Location: Somewhere over the . . . hill

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby tandfman » Sat Oct 20, 2012 2:24 pm

Turning to non-fiction, who has written more powerful words than these:

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation, so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.
tandfman
 
Posts: 15043
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Marlow » Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:05 pm

tandfman wrote:Turning to non-fiction, who has written more powerful words than these:
Four score and seven years ago


I thought Tommy J did an OK job here:

DoI wrote:When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.--That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.--Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world.
Marlow
 
Posts: 21121
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:00 pm
Location: Somewhere over the . . . hill

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Conor Dary » Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:44 pm

Garry Wills wrote a superb book on the speech. Definitely worth a read.

http://www.amazon.com/Lincoln-Gettysbur ... arry+wills
Conor Dary
 
Posts: 6297
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: कनोर दारी in Ronald MacDonald's Home Town, and once a Duck always a Duck.

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Marlow » Sat Oct 20, 2012 4:08 pm

Conor Dary wrote:Garry Wills wrote a superb book on the speech. Definitely worth a read.
http://www.amazon.com/Lincoln-Gettysbur ... arry+wills

Lincoln is such a fascinating character, I can't wait to see the upcoming Spielberg movie with Daniel Day-Lewis playing him! 3 weeks to go!
Marlow
 
Posts: 21121
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:00 pm
Location: Somewhere over the . . . hill

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby kuha » Sat Oct 20, 2012 4:43 pm

Marlow wrote:
Conor Dary wrote:Garry Wills wrote a superb book on the speech. Definitely worth a read.
http://www.amazon.com/Lincoln-Gettysbur ... arry+wills

Lincoln is such a fascinating character, I can't wait to see the upcoming Spielberg movie with Daniel Day-Lewis playing him! 3 weeks to go!


Those vampires don't stand a chance!!!
kuha
 
Posts: 9031
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: 3rd row, on the finish line

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Marlow » Sat Oct 20, 2012 5:16 pm

kuha wrote:Those vampires don't stand a chance!!!

Nor the zombies . . . :roll:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2246549/
Marlow
 
Posts: 21121
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:00 pm
Location: Somewhere over the . . . hill

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby kuha » Sat Oct 20, 2012 6:03 pm

Marlow wrote:
kuha wrote:Those vampires don't stand a chance!!!

Nor the zombies . . . :roll:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2246549/


Oh, right. I can't keep my fictional historical monsters straight. Sorry. :?
kuha
 
Posts: 9031
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: 3rd row, on the finish line

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Marlow » Sat Oct 20, 2012 6:16 pm

kuha wrote:
Marlow wrote:
kuha wrote:Those vampires don't stand a chance!!!

Nor the zombies . . . :roll:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2246549/

Oh, right. I can't keep my fictional historical monsters straight. Sorry. :?

No, no, no - you were correct!

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1611224/
Marlow
 
Posts: 21121
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:00 pm
Location: Somewhere over the . . . hill

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby kuha » Sat Oct 20, 2012 6:48 pm

:lol:

True American Exceptionalism.
kuha
 
Posts: 9031
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: 3rd row, on the finish line

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby tandfman » Sun Oct 21, 2012 4:45 am

How did we manage to go from beautiful writing to vampires and zombies? :roll:
tandfman
 
Posts: 15043
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby Pego » Sun Oct 21, 2012 5:32 am

Can "George Washington vs The Potomac Werewolf" be far behind? Stay tuned.
Pego
 
Posts: 10202
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: beyond help

Re: Writing: the long and the short of it

Postby tandfman » Sun Oct 21, 2012 6:48 am

Let's see if I can get this back on track (no wait--this is supposed to be Not Track). :)

Here's another bit of eloquence from Mr. Lincoln, this from his first inaugural address:

We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory stretching from every battlefield and patriotic grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land will yet swell the chorus of the Union when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.
tandfman
 
Posts: 15043
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests