Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies


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Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby jazzcyclist » Mon Sep 20, 2010 7:45 am

http://backporch.fanhouse.com/2010/09/1 ... ussy-game/
The statistics today are overwhelming. I saw Peyton Manning one time and he had a great comeback drive, but he had two 15-yard roughing-the-passer penalties. I'm thinking, 'I don't ever remember having one of those.' It's kind of a wussy game, really, in a way.

Looking back at what defensive players used to be able to get away, I think he might have a point. Can you imagine what would happen to a player if he did to Peyton Manning what Turkey Jones did to Terry Bradshaw? How would today's recievers deal with Dick "Night Train" Lane? What would the commisioner do with someone like Dick Butkus?
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Rye Catcher » Mon Sep 20, 2010 8:04 am

jazzcyclist wrote:http://backporch.fanhouse.com/2010/09/15/roger-staubach-thinks-todays-nfl-is-kind-of-a-wussy-game/
The statistics today are overwhelming. I saw Peyton Manning one time and he had a great comeback drive, but he had two 15-yard roughing-the-passer penalties. I'm thinking, 'I don't ever remember having one of those.' It's kind of a wussy game, really, in a way.

Looking back at what defensive players used to be able to get away, I think he might have a point. Can you imagine what would happen to a player if he did to Peyton Manning what Turkey Jones did to Terry Bradshaw? How would today's recievers deal with Dick "Night Train" Lane? What would the commisioner do with someone like Dick Butkus?


Navy guys are just tougher. Ask Marlow.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Marlow » Mon Sep 20, 2010 8:23 am

jazzcyclist wrote:http://backporch.fanhouse.com/2010/09/15/roger-staubach-thinks-todays-nfl-is-kind-of-a-wussy-game/
he had two 15-yard roughing-the-passer penalties. I'm thinking, 'I don't ever remember having one of those.' It's kind of a wussy game, really, in a way.

I think he might have a point.

No, he doesn't, and Rog should know better. Go visit some players from 30-40 years ago - they're a mess. They have dementia from two many concussions and have worthless knees from too many crack-back blocks. The present rules TRY to safe-guard players as much as possible, which, if you read the injury reports, really isn't all that much.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby jazzcyclist » Mon Sep 20, 2010 9:49 am

Football is considered the most macho of all American team sports, but has the definiton of "macho" changed over the years to something Staubach's generation can't relate to? Last month, a Miami Dolphins practice had to be stopped so that a player could look for his earring that he forgot to take off before practice. Can you imagine George Halas interrupting a team practice so that a player could look for his lost earring?
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby lonewolf » Mon Sep 20, 2010 10:56 am

Can you imagine George Halas allowing a player with an earring on the field?
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Conor Dary » Mon Sep 20, 2010 11:19 am

Before Staubach played, the rules in the NFL were that you had to be held down to be tackled. And before that in the 30's and early 40's if you were substituted you had to stay out until the end of the quarter.

But the game is so brutal know. The Fridge was a big guy 25 years ago and now would be on the average size now.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Marlow » Mon Sep 20, 2010 11:21 am

lonewolf wrote:Can you imagine George Halas allowing a player with an earring on the field?

Our 'consciousness' has been raised a little since those days. I don't think Halas would change a thing on this guy.

http://www.examiner.com/images/blog/wysiwyg/image/polamalu-si-cover(1).jpg
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Daisy » Mon Sep 20, 2010 12:07 pm

They might have roughing penalties but that does not stop the 300 pound gorillas going for the hit. Better to have the quarterback out and take your chances with a penalty. And how often was Staubach being hit by 300 lbs players?
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Pego » Mon Sep 20, 2010 2:10 pm

The game is still way rougher than it needs to be. How many games are there even at the high school level that have nobody carried off the field? Just because it was rougher in Staubach's days does not mean it was right then. There are still ways to make it more technical and less brutal.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Wang Lung » Mon Sep 20, 2010 3:41 pm

Pego wrote:The game is still way rougher than it needs to be. How many games are there even at the high school level that have nobody carried off the field? Just because it was rougher in Staubach's days does not mean it was right then. There are still ways to make it more technical and less brutal.


They call that chess. And it's boring.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby jazzcyclist » Mon Sep 20, 2010 5:09 pm

Daisy wrote:They might have roughing penalties but that does not stop the 300 pound gorillas going for the hit. Better to have the quarterback out and take your chances with a penalty.
Nowadays, if you do what those old timers did, you'll get more than a penalty, you'll miss a few paychecks, and for guys like Albert Haynesworth and Darelle Revis, that's more than a million dollars.
Daisy wrote: And how often was Staubach being hit by 300 lbs players?

George Atkinson and Jack Tatum didn't weigh 300 pounds but that didn't stop them from doing this. And according to the NFL's official website (nfl.com), Turkey Jones only weighed 250 pounds when he did this.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby cullman » Mon Sep 20, 2010 5:28 pm

Wang Lung wrote:
Pego wrote:The game is still way rougher than it needs to be. How many games are there even at the high school level that have nobody carried off the field? Just because it was rougher in Staubach's days does not mean it was right then. There are still ways to make it more technical and less brutal.


They call that chess. And it's boring.

Chess...boring?? Them is fightin' words WL! :)

cman 8-)
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby jazzcyclist » Mon Sep 20, 2010 5:41 pm

Pego wrote:The game is still way rougher than it needs to be. How many games are there even at the high school level that have nobody carried off the field? Just because it was rougher in Staubach's days does not mean it was right then. There are still ways to make it more technical and less brutal.

I'll admit starting this thread to stir the pot a little, but I do agree with you in principle. In an ideal world, the rules would be written under the assumption that the brother(s), son(s) and/or grandson(s) of the commissioner will be the ones playing the game.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Daisy » Mon Sep 20, 2010 6:16 pm

jazzcyclist wrote:George Atkinson and Jack Tatum didn't weigh 300 pounds but that didn't stop them from doing this.

This sport is just mental.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby jhc68 » Tue Sep 21, 2010 6:40 am

I'm thinking that even with the rule and enforcement changes that Staubach would sing a different tune if he had to contend with the size, speed and strength of the current generation of NFL players.
My bet is that Roger the Dodger's long career of running around freelancing away from big slow defenders would have been cut short in modern times.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby jazzcyclist » Tue Sep 21, 2010 7:04 am

jhc68 wrote:My bet is that Roger the Dodger's long career of running around freelancing away from big slow defenders would have been cut short in modern times.

Huh? :? Staubach only had an 11-year career and he spent his first two years on the bench. His career was short compared to the careers of modern day quarterbacks like Peyton Manning and Tom Brady, who are in their 13th and 11th years respectively, and still in their primes, not to mention Brett Favre who is in his 20 year.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Marlow » Tue Sep 21, 2010 8:02 am

jazzcyclist wrote:Favre who is in his 20 year.

Talk about a throw-back. Madden's love affair with him on the all-Madden team was well-founded. The guy (despite his inane quittings and unquittings) is sumpin else!
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby lonewolf » Tue Sep 21, 2010 8:25 am

jazzcyclist wrote:[Staubach only had an 11-year career and he spent his first two years on the bench. .

Staubach also did the Navy thing, getting a relatively late start as a pro QB.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby jazzcyclist » Tue Sep 21, 2010 8:34 am

lonewolf wrote:
jazzcyclist wrote:[Staubach only had an 11-year career and he spent his first two years on the bench. .

Staubach also did the Navy thing, getting a relatively late start as a pro QB.

I'm fully aware of that, but those five years he spent in the Navy were also five years that he wasn't getting abused in an NFL that hadn't yet put aprons on the quarterbacks. If Staubach had went straight from Annapolis to the NFL, I doubt that he would have lasted until 1979, unless he was willing to hang around until he was shell of himself, a la Johnny Unitas and Joe Nammath.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby jhc68 » Wed Sep 22, 2010 7:22 pm

It may be that Favre can be added to the list of those hanging around until they are shells of themselves. This will be an interesting season for him... certainly no wussie but maybe not the brightest light, either.
As for Staubach, maybe it just seemed like he played forever since I got so weary of watching him run in circles ala Fran Tarkenton. I still doubt he'd have lasted his 11 years trying to do all that running and dodging among the big, fast guys pass rushing now.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby jazzcyclist » Thu Sep 23, 2010 5:25 am

jhc68 wrote:As for Staubach, maybe it just seemed like he played forever since I got so weary of watching him run in circles ala Fran Tarkenton. I still doubt he'd have lasted his 11 years trying to do all that running and dodging among the big, fast guys pass rushing now.

According to nfl.com, Staubach was 6-3/197 and Tarkenton 6-0/190. Currently they list Peyton Manning at 6-5/230, Tom Brady at 6-4/225, Drew Brees at 6-0/209 and Michael Vick at 6-0/215. Back in the old days, before the NFL legalized holding, err, liberalized the pass blocking rules, quarterbacks had to be agile, especially when you consider the fact that cornerbacks were allowed to mug their receivers all the way down the field. I think Brees and Vick would have done well in the old days, but I don't think Manning and Brady would have lasted too long, due to their lack of mobility.

By the way, did anyone else see the Steelers piledrive Vince Young this past Sunday?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5Qw0Rvc ... re=related

I'm beginning to think that the NFL is only interested in protecting certain quarterbacks. I have a hard time believing that they could have done that to Peyton Manning and not at least get a roughing-the-passer penalty.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby jhc68 » Thu Sep 23, 2010 7:01 am

Ouch... 3 on 1 and he is dropped on headfirst well after the zebra shirt guy is waving the play dead.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby odelltrclan » Thu Sep 23, 2010 8:39 am

Marlow wrote:
jazzcyclist wrote:http://backporch.fanhouse.com/2010/09/15/roger-staubach-thinks-todays-nfl-is-kind-of-a-wussy-game/
he had two 15-yard roughing-the-passer penalties. I'm thinking, 'I don't ever remember having one of those.' It's kind of a wussy game, really, in a way.

I think he might have a point.

No, he doesn't, and Rog should know better. Go visit some players from 30-40 years ago - they're a mess. They have dementia from two many concussions and have worthless knees from too many crack-back blocks. The present rules TRY to safe-guard players as much as possible, which, if you read the injury reports, really isn't all that much.


Maybe some of them are a mess but wasn't it their choice? I am sure many of them would have made the same choice with the same rules today. A lot of these players did it as well for peanuts compared with the players of today. I think Roger does have a point, like it or not, or agree with it or not.

I think the game is better today for the fact that it is trying to protect the players more, but, I admit that I miss some of the old style and often get tired of today's Divas as well.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Pego » Thu Sep 23, 2010 10:05 am

jazzcyclist wrote:By the way, did anyone else see the Steelers piledrive Vince Young this past Sunday?


NFL fines Harrison $5000. Peanuts. The Steelers are my second most favored NFL team (right after the Pack), but I'll say that goons like Harrison (this is not the first or second for him) should be severely penalized.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Marlow » Thu Sep 23, 2010 11:43 am

odelltrclan wrote:Maybe some of them are a mess but wasn't it their choice?

I see no choice involved. They wanted to be pro football players, so you either play by their (unsafe) rules or not play at all (which, to them, was not an option, psychologically speaking).

It's like boxing or MMA. Totally voluntary, but guys (and some gals) are making monumentally poor choices (driven of course by fame and glory (and $$$)) to participate at all, when you consider how many end up with crippling (brain and body) injuries. 'Free choice' ain't all it's cracked up to be.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby jazzcyclist » Thu Sep 23, 2010 12:17 pm

Marlow wrote:I see no choice involved. They wanted to be pro football players, so you either play by their (unsafe) rules or not play at all (which, to them, was not an option, psychologically speaking).

Have you forgotten what Hyman Roth said to Michael Corleone?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tk6DPq2_c2M

Haven't you seen the movie Crossroads? It's called "selling you soul to the devil". Robert Johnson did it, why can't these guys? Of course, I'm sympathetic to the old timers who didn't know any better, but the current generation of football players know they're making a deal with the devil.

I have a first cousin who is in his tenth year in the league. A couple of weeks ago he got his clock cleaned, and after the game my brother asked him if he was feeling alright, and he assured him that he was. However, since then, he's confided to my uncle that he did get concussed on the play in question, but he didn't want to report it because he knew that once the team got involved, he would be forced to miss an indeterminate number of games in a year that he's due for another contract. Him, his parents and his brother are already set for life, but at this point, I think he's simply addicted to the money. When he came out of college, he was the most non-materialistic person in my extended family, but not anymore.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby odelltrclan » Thu Sep 23, 2010 12:54 pm

Marlow wrote:
odelltrclan wrote:Maybe some of them are a mess but wasn't it their choice?

I see no choice involved. They wanted to be pro football players, so you either play by their (unsafe) rules or not play at all (which, to them, was not an option, psychologically speaking).

It's like boxing or MMA. Totally voluntary, but guys (and some gals) are making monumentally poor choices (driven of course by fame and glory (and $$$)) to participate at all, when you consider how many end up with crippling (brain and body) injuries. 'Free choice' ain't all it's cracked up to be.


A key word in your response Marlow is WANT. I want a lot myself, but I know that I cannot have all I want. And there are consequences that come as a result of the pursuit of those wants. People have to LEARN to balance those wants with the consequences. Some of the older generation of NFL players may not have understood some of the issues with concussions that we understand today, but you could never convince me that these people did not know they were at risk of serious injury. They played the game because they love it. I think it was more so back then than now because the money now is not even comparable to the 50s 60s and 70s. And I believe many of the Butkus's would still be doing it with the old rules in effect today for lesser money.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Dutra » Thu Sep 23, 2010 4:41 pm

jazzcyclist wrote:Football is considered the most macho of all American team sports, but has the definiton of "macho" changed over the years to something Staubach's generation can't relate to? Last month, a Miami Dolphins practice had to be stopped so that a player could look for his earring that he forgot to take off before practice. Can you imagine George Halas interrupting a team practice so that a player could look for his lost earring?


:D

I coach at the youth level...usually 12-14 yr old both football and basketball and I remember commenting that I never thought I would see the day when, prior to practice I'd have to collect the earings of the players or that, on occasion, a player would not be able to practice because he went to get his ears pierced during that afternoon and couldn't wear a helmet.

:) :)
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby scottmitchell74 » Fri Sep 24, 2010 3:08 am

I'm thinking that even with the rule and enforcement changes that Staubach would sing a different tune if he had to contend with the size, speed and strength of the current generation of NFL players.
My bet is that Roger the Dodger's long career of running around freelancing away from big slow defenders would have been cut short in modern times.


This was the point I was going to make, had it not already been made.

Stabauch maybe faced 1 or 2 guys a week on defense that weighed more than 250 AND ran 4.6, 4.5 or so. Now that's your average linebacker and often DE are much bigger.

The amazing Jack Lambert (and he was amazing) was listed at 220, but came into the league barely 200 pounds. I have football cards of him from when I was a kid that list him at 205.

The Mad Stork was aptly named and stretched 220 pounds over his 6'7" frame.

The League is so much bigger and faster. Some of the rules strike me as "pansy" as well, but I can't imagine a stationary QB lasting long without most of the rules.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Marlow » Fri Sep 24, 2010 3:38 am

odelltrclan wrote:A key word in your response Marlow is WANT. I want a lot myself, but I know that I cannot have all I want. And there are consequences that come as a result of the pursuit of those wants. People have to LEARN to balance those wants with the consequences. Some of the older generation of NFL players may not have understood some of the issues with concussions that we understand today, but you could never convince me that these people did not know they were at risk of serious injury. They played the game because they love it. I think it was more so back then than now because the money now is not even comparable to the 50s 60s and 70s. And I believe many of the Butkus's would still be doing it with the old rules in effect today for lesser money.

In a poll, someone asked a group of athletes this question(I paraphrase). If you could take a pill that would guarantee a gold Medal, but you'd die in 5 years, would you take it? Most said 'yes'.
Clearly there is a complete disconnect between what they think they want (glory, later wealth) and what they really want (life). Same goes for boxers and MMA fighters.

You say "people have to LEARN". Yeah, good luck with that. In your experience do people who habitually make really bad life choices suddenly see the light? In my experience that only happens through an external motivation like an Intervention.

When you say football players 'love the game', I think that's a misperception. They love the rush of hitting and getting hit, and the rush of competition, mano-a-mano, not the game, per se. You could substitute another game, say, lacrosse, and the effect would be similar.

I have a boy in my class right now with a severe (football) concussion. He has been explained the consequences of getting another in the near future (an highly increased likelihood of permanent brain damage) and yet he's still DYING (bad pun) to get back out there. :(
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Pego » Fri Sep 24, 2010 5:12 am

Marlow wrote:In a poll, someone asked a group of athletes this question(I paraphrase). If you could take a pill that would guarantee a gold Medal, but you'd die in 5 years, would you take it? Most said 'yes'.


I take this sort of polls with a grain of salt (millions of grains, actually}. There is a huge difference between yapping fighting words to an interviewer and actually doing the deed. if the situation presented itself. This is about as believable as most polls regarding people's sexual conduct. Some embellish, some diminish, nobody is sincere.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby jazzcyclist » Fri Sep 24, 2010 5:21 am

Marlow wrote:In a poll, someone asked a group of athletes this question(I paraphrase). If you could take a pill that would guarantee a gold Medal, but you'd die in 5 years, would you take it? Most said 'yes'.
Clearly there is a complete disconnect between what they think they want (glory, later wealth) and what they really want (life). Same goes for boxers and MMA fighters.

You're assuming that these folks have the same value system that you do. Has it occurred to you that there may be sane, intelligent adults in this world who don't share your value system? If someone could guarantee to you that you would have excellent health until you were 120 years old, but that you would have to spend the rest of your life living on a deserted island by yourself, would you take that deal? My point is that the quality of one's life is just as important as the quantity, and it's up to each one of us to decide what the right balance is. Obviously, some folks value the quality a lot more than you do. As Martin Luther King once said:
The quality, not the longevity, of one's life is what is important.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby jazzcyclist » Fri Sep 24, 2010 6:24 am

Another thing to keep in mind is that not every former NFL football player becomes mentally and/or physically handicapped when they get older. For every Earl Campbell, there's a Sammy Baugh. They see Terry Bradshaw on TV, cracking jokes and analyzing games, in apparently good health and they say, "I'll be like him 30-40 years from now." It's the same mindset of combat soldiers. The folks who stormed the beaches of Normandy and Iwo Jima knew that casualties would be high, but they figured they would be one of the lucky ones.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Marlow » Fri Sep 24, 2010 7:07 am

jazzcyclist wrote:You're assuming that these folks have the same value system that you do.
The quality, not the longevity, of one's life is what is important.

So let me make sure I've got you right. A person who would exchange a gold medal for a life ending in their mid-30s, is sane AND intelligent.

OK. :roll:
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby jazzcyclist » Fri Sep 24, 2010 8:19 am

Marlow wrote:
jazzcyclist wrote:You're assuming that these folks have the same value system that you do.
The quality, not the longevity, of one's life is what is important.

So let me make sure I've got you right. A person who would exchange a gold medal for a life ending in their mid-30s, is sane AND intelligent.

OK. :roll:

What I'm saying is that there are mentally competent people in this world who don't share your value system, and obviously MLK was one of them. Are you so close-minded that you're incapable of seeing this? :roll: Does anything at all matter to you other than longevity? Earl Campbell has said that if he had to do it all over again, he would do the same thing? Are we to assume that he's mentally incompetent? Ferdie Pacheco, Muhammad Ali's doctor, warned him about the damage that he was doing himself, and recommended that he retire in the mid-70's. Are we to assume that Ali's insistence on continuing to fight was due to insanity?

For the record, the value that I place on my long-term health and longevity is probably similar to yours, but I don't assume that those who don't share my values are insane.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Marlow » Fri Sep 24, 2010 10:24 am

jazzcyclist wrote:What I'm saying is that there are mentally competent people in this world who don't share your value system,

I certainly hope so. What a dull world otherwise.

jazzcyclist wrote:and obviously MLK was one of them. Are you so close-minded that you're incapable of seeing this? :roll:

WTF??!! Total non-sequitur.

jazzcyclist wrote:Does anything at all matter to you other than longevity?

Lots of things. Quality of life (Pursuit of Happiness) being chief among them.

jazzcyclist wrote:Are we to assume that Ali's insistence on continuing to fight was due to insanity?

If the old Ali could go back in time, he would beg the intermediate Ali to stay retired, if he thought he would prevent his current state.

jazzcyclist wrote:For the record, the value that I place on my long-term health and longevity is probably similar to yours, but I don't assume that those who don't share my values are insane.

I'm not talking about 'values'; I'm talking about people who make critically bad decisions, because they do not consider the ramifications of their actions.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Pego » Fri Sep 24, 2010 10:50 am

Perhaps I can hijack this thread, so you two quit sniping at each other needlessly :wink: .

I have not seen Ali's MRI (pictures or reports), but of what I've seen of him, especially many years ago, in the beginning of his progression, it looked to me more like an idiopathic Parkinson's Disease than a secondary parkinsonism due to a battered brain syndrome.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Marlow » Fri Sep 24, 2010 10:55 am

Pego wrote:it looked to me more like an idiopathic Parkinson's Disease than a secondary parkinsonism due to a battered brain syndrome.

That's why I put the 'if' in there. I've heard both sides. In any case, the latter is a real (preventable) condition.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby jazzcyclist » Sat Sep 25, 2010 2:46 am

Marlow wrote:
jazzcyclist wrote:Are we to assume that Ali's insistence on continuing to fight was due to insanity?

If the old Ali could go back in time, he would beg the intermediate Ali to stay retired, if he thought he would prevent his current state.

You're making an assumption about something you can not possibly know, unless, of course, you have a magic crystal ball, which to my knowledge hasn't been invented yet. How do you know he doesn't think that it was all worth it? Putting Ali aside, what leads you to believe that George Foreman, Joe Frazier and Ken Norton, men who are now all in their 60's, regret their decisions to box?

Marlow wrote:
jazzcyclist wrote:For the record, the value that I place on my long-term health and longevity is probably similar to yours, but I don't assume that those who don't share my values are insane.

I'm not talking about 'values'; I'm talking about people who make critically bad decisions, because they do not consider the ramifications of their actions.

You are absolutely talking values when you accuse all boxers and MMA fighters of making bad decisions.
Clearly there is a complete disconnect between what they think they want (glory, later wealth) and what they really want (life). Same goes for boxers and MMA fighters.
It's no different than accusing someone who volunteered for the Army of making a bad decision because of the likelihood of returning from Afghanistan or Iraq maimed or in body bag. I've seen interviews with soldiers, who returned from Iraq with limbs missing, say that they don't regret their decision to volunteer for military service? For some folks, athletic success, fame and money are very important, while others believe that serving their country at a time of war is important. And for the record, I know many people who think that anyone who would volunteer for the U.S. Armed forces is a sap, unless there are Chinese storming the beaches of California.
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Re: Roger Staubach Calls Today's Players Wussies

Postby Marlow » Sat Sep 25, 2010 6:14 am

I'll put it another way: would you agree that the overwhelming consensus is that MMA is a very dangerous sport and most people would not want their loved ones engaged in it, if it were entirely up to them (not the person who wants to do it)? On the other hand, I would not stand in the way of my daughter wishing to join the military and ship off to Afghanistan.

Of course some people want to be MMA fighters (or prostitutes, another career path that most people would not want their loved one to embark upon). I'm just saying that most people would agree those are 'bad choices'.
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