What are you reading now?


A place for the discussion of all things not closely related to the sport and its competitive side. (as always, locked for the duration of major international championship)

Postby gh » Mon Jul 27, 2009 11:20 am

lonewolf wrote:
gh wrote:Has Ludlum written anything lately?

Ludlum died in 2001. I chanced on his last book, entitled "The Sigma Protocol" c 2001 in the Eugene airport. Not exactly recent but I have about a dozen Ludlums and this one had slipped by. I dont know if any have been realeased since his death


I guess I should have put a smiley on my statement.
gh
 
Posts: 46335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am
Location: firmly at Arya's side!

Postby lonewolf » Mon Jul 27, 2009 1:14 pm

gh wrote:
lonewolf wrote:
gh wrote:Has Ludlum written anything lately?

Ludlum died in 2001. I chanced on his last book, entitled "The Sigma Protocol" c 2001 in the Eugene airport. Not exactly recent but I have about a dozen Ludlums and this one had slipped by. I dont know if any have been realeased since his death


I guess I should have put a smiley on my statement.


I went to Google. Actually there have been several "Ludlum" books released since his death, authorized by his estate and authored/edited by selected authors.
lonewolf
 
Posts: 8816
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Indian Territory

Postby gh » Thu Oct 08, 2009 4:51 am

Just finished Salt, A World History, by Mark Kurlansky.

A history of man's production of salt, which on the surface sounds dreadfully boring, I know, but it actually opens up a whole side of our back story (with interesting sidebars on gastronomy) that I hadn't realized.

I had no idea of the way wars have raged and empires have risen and fallen with salt as a major underpinning.

Remember the old dictum (Napoleon) of "an army travels on its stomach"? Living off the land rarely a complete option, so for thousands of years armies had to have preserved food and the only preservative known, basically, was salt. So if you didn't have a large and ongoing salt supply (and some countries, surprisingly enough, do not), then you can't keep a large army in the field.

And then there's the invention of gunpowder, which requires salt... you get the picture. (as did the Confederacy, too late)

At any rate, for anybody with an eye for history this should be a terrific read.
gh
 
Posts: 46335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am
Location: firmly at Arya's side!

Postby kuha » Thu Oct 08, 2009 5:22 am

Recently finished "Hard Road West" (2008) by Keith Heyer Meldahl, which I thought was really excellent. It's a seamless interweaving of two powerful stories: the ordeal of the travelers on the Oregon & California trails of the 1830s-60s, and a geologist's interpretation of the land through which they passed.
kuha
 
Posts: 9035
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: 3rd row, on the finish line

Postby Marlow » Thu Oct 08, 2009 5:43 am

Marlow wrote:Any one else read The Road, soon to be a movie? Very :(


Last chance to read this VERY moving book before the movie comes out soon.
It's not often a sci-fi-ish, apocalyptic story gets the Pulitzer.
Marlow
 
Posts: 21128
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:00 pm
Location: Somewhere over the . . . hill

Postby tandfman » Thu Oct 08, 2009 6:56 am

gh wrote:Just finished Salt, A World History, by Mark Kurlansky.

Is reading it bad for one's blood pressure? :-)
tandfman
 
Posts: 15043
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Postby lonewolf » Thu Oct 08, 2009 12:17 pm

National Geographic, January 1918 issue devoted to the airwar in France.
The French were anxiously awaiting the arrival of "America's Air Fleet."

Subscription to NG was $2.00/year, which puts my (very) late father-in-law's wedding gift to his bride in 1916 of a $50 lifetime subscription, which she enjoyed for seventy years before willing the complete collection to me, in perspective.

Also, you could buy a new Dodge sedan for $1350 or roadster for $885, f.o.b. Detroit. NG subscription is now $34/year. At same percentage increase the sedan would now be $22,950 and the roadster $15,045.

I don't know if that is gooder or badder. Anybody bought any Dogge roadsters lately?
lonewolf
 
Posts: 8816
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Indian Territory

Postby 26mi235 » Thu Oct 08, 2009 2:30 pm

A Distant Mirror, Tuchman (history of the 14th century)

Men of Mathematics, E>T>Bell

Einstein: his life and universe‎ - by Walter Isaacson [just beginning]

Alpha Girls, Dan Kindlon [just beginning]
26mi235
 
Posts: 16335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Madison, WI

Postby gh » Thu Oct 08, 2009 4:51 pm

tandfman wrote:
gh wrote:Just finished Salt, A World History, by Mark Kurlansky.

Is reading it bad for one's blood pressure? :-)


Not if you take it with a grain of salt.
gh
 
Posts: 46335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am
Location: firmly at Arya's side!

Postby bambam » Thu Oct 08, 2009 5:01 pm

Collider - about particle physics
Talent is Overrated (somewhat like Outliers)
Olympic Dreams - Beijing Olympics
bambam
 
Posts: 3848
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Durham, NC

Postby gh » Fri Oct 09, 2009 7:33 am

The lead of Scott Ostler's column today:

<< I've been rethinking Jackie Robinson and Babe Ruth.

I've always had Robinson as my No. 1 courageous pioneer, and Ruth as the athlete with whom I'd most like to have a beer. Obvious, right?

Wrongo!

Satchel Paige now tops both my lists, since reading "Satchel," by Larry Tye (Random House), the new and well-researched Paige biography....>>

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.c ... 1A32SB.DTL
gh
 
Posts: 46335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am
Location: firmly at Arya's side!

Postby Mighty Favog » Fri Oct 09, 2009 7:38 am

My Life In France, by Julia Child.
Mighty Favog
 
Posts: 1789
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Postby jules » Fri Oct 09, 2009 9:14 am

gh wrote:Just finished Salt, A World History, by Mark Kurlansky.

A history of man's production of salt, which on the surface sounds dreadfully boring, I know, but it actually opens up a whole side of our back story (with interesting sidebars on gastronomy) that I hadn't realized.

I had no idea of the way wars have raged and empires have risen and fallen with salt as a major underpinning.

Remember the old dictum (Napoleon) of "an army travels on its stomach"? Living off the land rarely a complete option, so for thousands of years armies had to have preserved food and the only preservative known, basically, was salt. So if you didn't have a large and ongoing salt supply (and some countries, surprisingly enough, do not), then you can't keep a large army in the field.


And then there's the invention of gunpowder, which requires salt... you get the picture. (as did the Confederacy, too late)

At any rate, for anybody with an eye for history this should be a terrific read.


Sounds good to me, I'll have to get it.
jules
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Postby jules » Fri Oct 09, 2009 9:22 am

26mi235 wrote:A Distant Mirror, Tuchman (history of the 14th century)

Men of Mathematics, E>T>Bell

Einstein: his life and universe‎ - by Walter Isaacson [just beginning]

Alpha Girls, Dan Kindlon [just beginning]


If you like Bell's book, here are some suggestions.
2 bios of Paul Erdos : My Brain is Open by Bruce Schechter and The Man Who Loved Only Numbers by Paul Hoffman.

Hilbert by Constance Reid. She has written other math bios but I think this one is the best.
jules
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Postby Conor Dary » Fri Oct 09, 2009 9:33 am

jules wrote:
26mi235 wrote:A Distant Mirror, Tuchman (history of the 14th century)



Men of Mathematics, E>T>Bell

Einstein: his life and universe‎ - by Walter Isaacson [just beginning]

Alpha Girls, Dan Kindlon [just beginning]


If you like Bell's book, here are some suggestions.
2 bios of Paul Erdos : My Brain is Open by Bruce Schechter and The Man Who Loved Only Numbers by Paul Hoffman.

Hilbert by Constance Reid. She has written other math bios but I think this one is the best.


Yes, the Hoffman book on Erdos is a fine read. Erdos, was quite a character. His letters usually started with no greeting, just 'Let f(x) be a function...'

Also if you liked Hilbert, her companion piece Courant is a good read.
Conor Dary
 
Posts: 6297
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: कनोर दारी in Ronald MacDonald's Home Town, and once a Duck always a Duck.

Postby gh » Fri Oct 09, 2009 9:44 am

I don't have enough space on my shelves for any Hilbert.
gh
 
Posts: 46335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am
Location: firmly at Arya's side!

Postby TrainerPhil » Fri Oct 09, 2009 9:47 am

Michael Connelly's Black Ice..........I like a good "whodoneit."

Waiting to dig into Dan Brown's latest. I suspect it will be an easy read and entertaining like his previous books...
TrainerPhil
 
Posts: 1286
Joined: Fri Jul 10, 2009 11:41 am
Location: A step ahead of you !

Postby Conor Dary » Fri Oct 09, 2009 9:49 am

You mean you have no Hilbert Space?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hilbert_space
Conor Dary
 
Posts: 6297
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: कनोर दारी in Ronald MacDonald's Home Town, and once a Duck always a Duck.

Postby jules » Fri Oct 09, 2009 10:05 am

gh wrote:I don't have enough space on my shelves for any Hilbert.


Good insider pun.
jules
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Postby tandfman » Fri Oct 09, 2009 11:28 am

Sailed right over most of our heads, I'm sure.
tandfman
 
Posts: 15043
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Postby jules » Fri Oct 09, 2009 1:03 pm

There is a metric space that was invented by Hilbert and it is called a Hilbert Space. The undergrad math center at U of Oregon has a picture of Hilbert on the wall and is called Hilbert Space.

http://faculty.evansville.edu/ck6/bstud/hilbert.html

http://noether.uoregon.edu/~mathpeers/newsletter/mar04/
jules
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Postby gh » Fri Oct 09, 2009 1:15 pm

and if I hadn't hung out with some real wingnuts in Eugene, I wouldn't have known that!
gh
 
Posts: 46335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am
Location: firmly at Arya's side!

Postby Conor Dary » Fri Oct 09, 2009 3:20 pm

gh wrote:and if I hadn't hung out with some real wingnuts in Eugene, I wouldn't have known that!


I will bet trig was one of those wingnuts!
Conor Dary
 
Posts: 6297
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: कनोर दारी in Ronald MacDonald's Home Town, and once a Duck always a Duck.

Postby Speedfirst » Fri Oct 09, 2009 4:18 pm

The Bible
Speedfirst
 
Posts: 3368
Joined: Thu May 14, 2009 6:39 am

Postby bambam » Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:53 pm

jules wrote:There is a metric space that was invented by Hilbert and it is called a Hilbert Space. The undergrad math center at U of Oregon has a picture of Hilbert on the wall and is called Hilbert Space.

http://faculty.evansville.edu/ck6/bstud/hilbert.html

http://noether.uoregon.edu/~mathpeers/newsletter/mar04/


Similar great bumper stucker seen long time ago:

Heisenberg may have slept here.
bambam
 
Posts: 3848
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Durham, NC

Postby Brian » Fri Oct 09, 2009 7:17 pm

When times get periodically stressful, I cool down by reading for fun. Right now, I'm enjoying re-reading Kipling's "The Jungle Books."

Maybe the previous book I read--McDougall's "Born to Run"--has me in a back to basics mindset these days. :]
Brian
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Postby TNT » Fri Oct 09, 2009 7:53 pm

The Bible, Warren Wiersbe's The Bible Exposition Commentary, and Moody Classic's The Apostolic Fathers. Getting ready to read Lutzer's One Minute After You Die.
TNT
 
Posts: 132
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Los Alamos, New Mexico

Postby jules » Fri Oct 09, 2009 8:41 pm

I just finished the last Harry Potter book. 2 years ago I heard some teens talking about it on Bart. I harbored a misconception for 2 years.
Now I am reading Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon by Jorge Amado.
jules
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Postby gh » Fri Oct 09, 2009 8:55 pm

I only decided Harry Potter might be worth reading after sharing a Lufthansa flight to Frankfurt a few years ago and the guy next to me was a 40-something computer nerd and he was reading it in the German version, so I decided it muust have some redeeming value.

Most certainly did. Have read them all twice now except the last, which I'll do before the movie comes out. (make that movies, plural; last book is going to be made into a pair of flicks, apparently)
gh
 
Posts: 46335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am
Location: firmly at Arya's side!

Postby Friar » Fri Oct 09, 2009 9:04 pm

Losing Mum and Pup. About the William F. Buckleys. Kind of pathetic although not particularly surprising.

High: confessions of a drug smuggler.

Something in the Air (excerpt) I knew Dick Fosbury had a short career but not that short.
Friar
 
Posts: 1022
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Sittin' on the dock of the Bay.

Postby mike renfro » Fri Oct 09, 2009 10:28 pm

Last I read was "The Secret Speech" by Tom Rob Smith. It is a follow on to his first novel "Child 44". The protagonist is a MVD (then KGB) officer who got involved in solving murders (in the workers paradise, can't happen). Smith is a Brit, the books are pretty good. My next will be Joseph Kanon's new one, "Stardust". It takes place in Hollywood in the late 40s, early 50s during the the HUAC witch hunts. His 1st two were his strongest, IMO, Los Alamos & The Good German. The Prodigal Spy was okay, Alibi weak. Last chance Joe.

Oh, just remembered, one of Mary's tutees loaned her the new Dan Brown opus, "The Lost Symbol". I will probably read it, but I know how it will play out. The least likely suspect will turn out to be Dr Evil.
mike renfro
 
Posts: 3256
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: San Diego

Postby 26mi235 » Sat Oct 10, 2009 8:51 am

Conor Dary wrote:
jules wrote:
26mi235 wrote:A Distant Mirror, Tuchman (history of the 14th century)



Men of Mathematics, E>T>Bell

Einstein: his life and universe‎ - by Walter Isaacson [just beginning]

Alpha Girls, Dan Kindlon [just beginning]


If you like Bell's book, here are some suggestions.
2 bios of Paul Erdos : My Brain is Open by Bruce Schechter and The Man Who Loved Only Numbers by Paul Hoffman.

Hilbert by Constance Reid. She has written other math bios but I think this one is the best.


Yes, the Hoffman book on Erdos is a fine read. Erdos, was quite a character. His letters usually started with no greeting, just 'Let f(x) be a function...'

Also if you liked Hilbert, her companion piece Courant is a good read.


I have (and read) the Erdos book by Hoffman -- while we are on that topic, I think my number is 3, but it might be 4; I will have to talk with my wife, whose number is one better. [A friend/colleague's husband did the first 'real' proof (one that could be really verified) of the four color problem - he needed it as lemma for another result and did not trust the overly-long computer proof.]

The pun by gh was very good; maybe I will search out that Hilbert book.
26mi235
 
Posts: 16335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Madison, WI

Postby jules » Sat Oct 10, 2009 9:54 am

gh wrote:I only decided Harry Potter might be worth reading after sharing a Lufthansa flight to Frankfurt a few years ago and the guy next to me was a 40-something computer nerd and he was reading it in the German version, so I decided it muust have some redeeming value.

Most certainly did. Have read them all twice now except the last, which I'll do before the movie comes out. (make that movies, plural; last book is going to be made into a pair of flicks, apparently)


I only read the Harry Potter books because of GH. Before talking to him I thought they were kids' books.
jules
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Postby gh » Sat Oct 10, 2009 10:00 am

they are.... big kids!
gh
 
Posts: 46335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am
Location: firmly at Arya's side!

Postby jules » Sat Oct 10, 2009 10:03 am

gh wrote:they are.... big kids!


May we always be!
jules
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Postby bambam » Sat Oct 10, 2009 2:18 pm

26mi235 wrote:A friend/colleague's husband did the first 'real' proof (one that could be really verified) of the four color problem - he needed it as lemma for another result and did not trust the overly-long computer proof.


Good data, 26mi235. I was not aware that the four-color theorem had been proved in the "old way" rather than the poorly considered computer proof. Good to know.
bambam
 
Posts: 3848
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Durham, NC

Postby jules » Sat Oct 10, 2009 2:56 pm

Remember when Scientific American had an April 1st cover about the 4-color theorem?
jules
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Postby Conor Dary » Sat Oct 10, 2009 3:04 pm

bambam wrote:
26mi235 wrote:A friend/colleague's husband did the first 'real' proof (one that could be really verified) of the four color problem - he needed it as lemma for another result and did not trust the overly-long computer proof.


Good data, 26mi235. I was not aware that the four-color theorem had been proved in the "old way" rather than the poorly considered computer proof. Good to know.


I wasn't aware of that either. So that is 2 things I have learned on this thread. The other being that gh knows what a Hilbert Space is.
Conor Dary
 
Posts: 6297
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: कनोर दारी in Ronald MacDonald's Home Town, and once a Duck always a Duck.

Postby gh » Sat Oct 10, 2009 3:24 pm

gh wouldn't know a Hilbert Space if he tried to park in it; like a parrot, I just know the words.
gh
 
Posts: 46335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am
Location: firmly at Arya's side!

Postby IanS_Liv » Sat Oct 10, 2009 3:34 pm

gh wrote:gh wouldn't know a Hilbert Space if he tried to park in it; like a parrot, I just know the words.


Maybe you're more Dilbert Space?
IanS_Liv
 
Posts: 795
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 2:36 pm

PreviousNext

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests