Any way we can bring manufacturing back to the US?


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Any way we can bring manufacturing back to the US?

Postby BillVol » Sun Nov 02, 2008 7:46 pm

I think we are doomed if we don't. Last Christmas, we drove from Chattanooga to Wilmington, NC, and passed by many abandoned textile mills in North Carolina. It was sad. Plants all over this area are closing or have already closed and moved to Mexico or China. Even Thomasville furniture has moved operations from NC to China. Not good.
Last edited by BillVol on Sun Nov 02, 2008 8:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Any way we can bring manufacturing back to the US?

Postby Daisy » Sun Nov 02, 2008 7:51 pm

BillVol wrote:I think we are doomed if we don't. Last Christmas, we drove from Chattanooga to Wilmington, NC, and passed by many abandoned textile mills in North Carolina. It was sad. Plants all over this area are closing or have already closed and moved to Mexido or China. Even Thomasville furniture has moved operations from NC to China. Not good.


After Thatcher there is very little, if any, blue collar work in the UK. Steel, coal, ship building, cars etc. all disappeared. Some foreign companies still have plants in the UK. However, the economy did recover.
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Postby paulthefan » Sun Nov 02, 2008 9:10 pm

sure we could, we would simply need the same "nationalist" economic policies that our trading "partners" have rather than a "globalist" economic policy that we have had for the past 20 years.
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Postby BillVol » Sun Nov 02, 2008 9:15 pm

paulthefan wrote:sure we could, we would simply need the same "nationalist" economic policies that our trading "partners" have rather than a "globalist" economic policy that we have had for the past 20 years.


Wouldn't that be "isolationist," though?
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Postby paulthefan » Sun Nov 02, 2008 10:11 pm

BillVol wrote:
paulthefan wrote:sure we could, we would simply need the same "nationalist" economic policies that our trading "partners" have rather than a "globalist" economic policy that we have had for the past 20 years.


Wouldn't that be "isolationist," though?


yes sir, you are correct, we would be "isolating" our interests from those of our trading "partners"... just as they "isolate" their interests from ours.
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Postby BillVol » Mon Nov 03, 2008 7:08 pm

paulthefan wrote:
BillVol wrote:
paulthefan wrote:sure we could, we would simply need the same "nationalist" economic policies that our trading "partners" have rather than a "globalist" economic policy that we have had for the past 20 years.


Wouldn't that be "isolationist," though?


yes sir, you are correct, we would be "isolating" our interests from those of our trading "partners"... just as they "isolate" their interests from ours.


Thank you, paul. If only we could act the same way as all of our other "partners" do. But that would be mean if we did so, wouldn't it? ;)
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Postby rasb » Mon Nov 03, 2008 7:43 pm

ptf and bill vol, my amigos,
Stop your whining --- many of your trading partners, such as Canada and Mexico, are interested in mutually supportive trade relationships. NAFTA could be better, but it's a co-operative endeavour to further a win-win scenario between neighbours. Future negotiations will improve the situation, but it's a solid beginning. Other major trading partners such as Japan and China will need to be engaged in similar agreements that include provisions which will allow global trade to reflect the National interests of all partners. It's a time of change, and international dialogue is essential. A commitment to that dialogue is the starting point, and I think it can start on Wednesday, with the right election result. Any return to increased isolationalism is a retreat from the obvious future of the Planet. ( I think - :wink: )
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Postby BillVol » Mon Nov 03, 2008 8:04 pm

rasb wrote:ptf and bill vol, my amigos,
Stop your whining --- many of your trading partners, such as Canada and Mexico, are interested in mutually supportive trade relationships. NAFTA could be better, but it's a co-operative endeavour to further a win-win scenario between neighbours. Future negotiations will improve the situation, but it's a solid beginning. Other major trading partners such as Japan and China will need to be engaged in similar agreements that include provisions which will allow global trade to reflect the National interests of all partners. It's a time of change, and international dialogue is essential. A commitment to that dialogue is the starting point, and I think it can start on Wednesday, with the right election result. Any return to increased isolationalism is a retreat from the obvious future of the Planet. ( I think - :wink: )


Did you say something, rasb?
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Postby lonewolf » Mon Nov 03, 2008 9:41 pm

As those of you who have been paying attention know, I am a pretty conservative, USA first fellow. I don't buy foreign cars and do everything I can domestically. Some of you labeled me a "nationalist". I don't know it was intended as one more in an avalance of insults but, if so, you will be disappointed that I took it as a compliment.

At risk of being accused of wimping out, I confess that I am not completely immune to NAFTA and overseas experiments.

I am the major stockholder in a company that manufactures a line of patented quick release, rope ratchet tie down devices, which retail in the civilian market for $10 to15/unit.

We first tried tried manufacturing and assembling the products in Monterrey, Mexico at a cost of about $1.25 per unit but had problems with quality control, including loose screws and little nuisances like finding used condoms sealed inside the blister packs in a Wal-Mart shipment.

We moved operations to Phoenix where we outsourced extrusion and did assembly in our Mesa warehouse at an average total cost of approx. $1.75/unit until we secured a military contract which strained our capability. We then took advantage of an opportunity to piggy-back on a Ford Motor Co facilitator in Tucson; shipping the parts to Guaymas, Mexico on the Gulf of California for assemby at a final cost of approx $1.50/unit.

Worked great until the facilitator lost his Ford contract. We moved operations back to Mesa. By now, we had smartened up enough to produce the products ourself for about the same price with a lot less logistical hassle and the added comfort of being able to keep a close eye on the finished product.
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A major manufacturer of a diversified line of products made us an offer we could not refuse, paying us cash and royalty for license to manufacture the products and right of first refusal to buy us out. We retained all our civilian accounts and military contracts and continue to manufacture in Arizona for those and new accounts..

Our licensee is producing, in China, ten times the number of the products we do at a reported cost of 50 cents/unit. Plus our royalty, which somewhat assauges my guilt at being complicit in allowing part of the business to go overseas.

I dunno, what would you have done?
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