Malala Yousufza, the Most Impressive Kid I've Ever Seen


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Malala Yousufza, the Most Impressive Kid I've Ever Seen

Postby jazzcyclist » Fri Oct 11, 2013 5:13 pm

Malala Yousufzai is the young Pakistani girl who was shot by the Taliban for advocating education for girls. Having stared death in the eyes and survived, she has come back stronger and more determined than ever. She is my idea of a genuine hero. Her charisma and fearlessness is what terrifies the Taliban, because they realize that she has those very rare leadership qualities that can convince otherwise apathetic and/or cowardly people to summon their inner-courage and follow her. Gandhi and MLK both had this quality. Hopefully she will live a long and healthy life because there's no doubt in my mind that she would use her time on this planet to make the world a better place. Tonight she will on ABC's 20/20 for the full hour being interviewed by Diane Sawyer. However, here are a three videos that document her evolution over the last couple of years:

Malala before the shooting

Malala after the shooting

Malala's UN speech
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Re: Malala Yousufza, the Most Impressive Kid I've Ever Seen

Postby mcgato » Fri Oct 11, 2013 5:26 pm

I saw part of her interview on "The Daily Show" the other night. Very impressive. I couldn't watch all of it, as I'm too emotional and didn't want to be sobbing.
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Re: Malala Yousufza, the Most Impressive Kid I've Ever Seen

Postby jhc68 » Fri Oct 11, 2013 8:45 pm

Stunning.
A year ago she was an unknown to everyone except the people who wanted to kill her.
Now she speaks so eloquently as one (maybe THE) great models of integrity, morality and courage any where on earth.
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Re: Malala Yousufza, the Most Impressive Kid I've Ever Seen

Postby jeremyp » Sat Oct 12, 2013 11:53 am

Yet in Pakistan she is seen as a controversial figure. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/12/world ... ml?hp&_r=0
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Re: Malala Yousufza, the Most Impressive Kid I've Ever Seen

Postby gh » Sat Oct 12, 2013 1:23 pm

Link to the first of 3 parts w/ Jon Stewart

http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/tue-o ... view-pt--1
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Re: Malala Yousufza, the Most Impressive Kid I've Ever Seen

Postby jazzcyclist » Sat Oct 12, 2013 4:03 pm

Yesterday, she got the opportunity to meet President Obama at the White House, and rather than be content with a photo-op with the most powerful man in the world, which is what most adults would have done, she proceeded to berate him on his use of drones in pursuing the "war on terror".

The "Bravest Girl in the World" has stood up to President Barack Obama.

Malala Yousafzai, the 16-year-old shot by the Taliban for promoting girl's education in her native Pakistan, confronted Obama at the White House on Friday about U.S. drone strikes.

In a meeting that included first lady Michelle Obama, the young activist challenged one of Obama's premier counterterrorism strategies.

"I also expressed my concerns that drone attacks are fueling terrorism," she said in a statement released today. "Innocent victims are killed in these acts, and they lead to resentment among the Pakistani people. If we refocus efforts on education it will make a big impact."

The U.S. government has said strikes by the unmanned aircraft are a necessary part of the fight against militant groups, including the Taliban.

In an interview that will air Sunday at 7 p.m. with CNN's Christiane Amanpour, Malala said she is far from done serving.

"I want to become a prime minister of Pakistan, and I think it's really good. Because through politics I can serve my whole county. I can be the doctor of the whole country," she said.

http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/20 ... th-malala/
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Re: Malala Yousufza, the Most Impressive Kid I've Ever Seen

Postby jamese10452 » Mon Oct 14, 2013 3:49 pm

jazzcyclist wrote:Malala Yousufzai is the young Pakistani girl who was shot by the Taliban for advocating education for girls. Having stared death in the eyes and survived, she has come back stronger and more determined than ever. She is my idea of a genuine hero. Her charisma and fearlessness is what terrifies the Taliban, because they realize that she has those very rare leadership qualities that can convince otherwise apathetic and/or cowardly people to summon their inner-courage and follow her. Gandhi and MLK both had this quality. Hopefully she will live a long and healthy life because there's no doubt in my mind that she would use her time on this planet to make the world a better place. Tonight she will on ABC's 20/20 for the full hour being interviewed by Diane Sawyer. However, here are a three videos that document her evolution over the last couple of years:

Malala before the shooting

Malala after the shooting

Malala's UN speech


I agree, and for the points you made.
There is, however, a 15yr old boy that is right up there. Sorry I can't remember his name--edit: Jack Andraka-- but he was featured on 60 Minutes yesterday: battled his way over many obstacles to get into a lab where he could work on his project. Turns out he developed a throughgoing and widely praised study on early detection of pancreatic cancer. Blew many minds of seasoned scientists.
Last edited by jamese10452 on Mon Oct 14, 2013 5:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Malala Yousufza, the Most Impressive Kid I've Ever Seen

Postby jazzcyclist » Mon Oct 14, 2013 4:15 pm

jamese10452 wrote:I agree, and for the points you made.
There is, however, a 15yr old boy that is right up there. Sorry I can't remember his name but he was featured on 60 Minutes yesterday: battled his way over many obstacles to get into a lab where he could work on his project. Turns out he developed a throughgoing and widely praised study on early detection of pancreatic cancer. Blew many minds of seasoned scientists.

So perhaps what we have here are future Nobel Prize winners for peace and medicine? Hmmm . . .
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Re: Malala Yousufza, the Most Impressive Kid I've Ever Seen

Postby no one » Mon Oct 14, 2013 4:30 pm

Malala Yousafzai ... regal. That's powerful stuff
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Re: Malala Yousufza, the Most Impressive Kid I've Ever Seen

Postby jamese10452 » Mon Oct 14, 2013 5:53 pm

jazzcyclist wrote:
jamese10452 wrote:I agree, and for the points you made.
There is, however, a 15yr old boy that is right up there. Sorry I can't remember his name but he was featured on 60 Minutes yesterday: battled his way over many obstacles to get into a lab where he could work on his project. Turns out he developed a throughgoing and widely praised study on early detection of pancreatic cancer. Blew many minds of seasoned scientists.

So perhaps what we have here are future Nobel Prize winners for peace and medicine? Hmmm . . .


Well, it's been a very long time since we'v seen the like of Malala (Joan d'Arc comes to mind) and the Andraka boy (a self-proclaimed science geek) is very charismatic and driven. he had the old boys science club with their jaws on the floor.) I smell Nobel coming up...
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Re: Malala Yousufza, the Most Impressive Kid I've Ever Seen

Postby jazzcyclist » Wed Oct 16, 2013 1:07 pm

Yesterday, NPR interviewed her father in which he says that he didn't do anything special raising Malala except stay out of her way once he realized she was special.

"I think Malala is an average girl," Ziauddin Yousafzai says about the 16-year-old Pakistani girl who captured the world's attention after being shot by the Taliban, "but there's something extraordinary about her."

A teacher himself, Yousafzai inspired his daughter's fight to be educated. At a special event with Malala in Washington, D.C., he tells NPR's Michel Martin that he is often asked what training he gave to his daughter. "I usually tell people, 'You should not ask me what I have done. Rather you ask me, what I did not do,' " he says. "I did not clip her wings to fly. I did not stop her from flying."

Yousafzai has this advice for parents of girls around the world: "Trust your daughters, they are faithful. Honor your daughters, they are honorable. And educate your daughters, they are amazing."


He also seems to have always been disturbed by the treatment women in Pakistani society, including his own sisters when he was growing up.

When asked what gave him a passion for girls' education, Yousafzai points out that he was "born in a society where girls are ignored." Living with five sisters, he was sensitive to discrimination from an early age. "In the morning, I was used to milk and cream, and my sisters were given only tea," he says.

Yousafzai felt the injustice even more when Malala was born. He later opened a school that Malala attended in the Swat Valley. At the time, the Taliban's influence was gaining power and both Yousafzais were firmly on their radar. "But we thought that even terrorists might have some ethics," Yousafzai says. "Because they destroyed some 1,500 schools but they never injured a child. And she was a child."


http://www.npr.org/2013/10/15/234730460 ... erful-girl

This picture says it all.

http://sesapzai.files.wordpress.com/201 ... ala-11.jpg
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