Frontline: League of Denial


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Frontline: League of Denial

Postby JumboElliott » Tue Oct 08, 2013 6:43 pm

Just woof. I'd like to know what the doctors on here think about football/CTE and all of those other things, but this is just devastating to watch.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby bambam » Wed Oct 09, 2013 4:50 pm

I watched the whole show. Thought it was well done. Interesting to watch ESPN bury it today and barely mention it. Certainly not their lead story on any show. Pretty significant indictment of the NFL. I am also almost finished with the book League of Denial, which is also very good, and follows the Frontline film fairly closely.

Pego best placed to comment on this as a neurologist, with Dr Jay also well placed to discuss some of the post-concussive symptoms the NFLers develop, which he likely sees more in his older patients.

I'm here for any rotator cuff issues, however.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby Pego » Wed Oct 09, 2013 5:10 pm

My 2¢ worth. To markedly reduce head injuries, football (at all levels) needs to do two things.

1. Outlaw all hits to head (I don't care about cries of "softening" the game - it is quite violent by its very nature).

2. Redesign the helmet to offer more protection without being a weapon.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby JumboElliott » Wed Oct 09, 2013 5:14 pm

How about something similar to a HANS device to limit the amount of travel by the head?
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby jazzcyclist » Wed Oct 09, 2013 8:10 pm

Pego wrote:My 2¢ worth. To markedly reduce head injuries, football (at all levels) needs to do two things.

1. Outlaw all hits to head (I don't care about cries of "softening" the game - it is quite violent by its very nature).

2. Redesign the helmet to offer more protection without being a weapon.

Hits to the head are already outlawed at all levels of football.

IMO, one thing that would make the game safer is bringing back bump-and-run coverage. The reason it was banned was because the NFL wanted to give more advantage to offenses in order to increase scoring, but as a result, defenses started playing a lot less man-to-man coverage and a lot more zone coverage. The most violent football collisions are of defensive backs sprinting across the field to blow up a receiver at the moment the ball is arriving. The ban on bump-and-run coverage increased the frequency of these collisions in two ways:

    1) It increases the likelihood that offenses will face zone defenses, and therefore the likelihood that the first defender to the receiver will be a defensive back sprinting across the field, as opposed one who has been running stride for stride with the receiver since the play started.
    2) It increases the incentive for offenses to pass instead of run, since receivers are harder to cover when defensive backs can't bump and run.

Another admittedly radical idea would be to bring back leather helmets and thin, 1920's era shoulder pads. One of the biggest problems that I see is the mentality, which is bred into football players starting in little league, that you're supposed to blow up your opponent, not just block or tackle him. But the only reason why players feel emboldened to blow up people is because of the modern helmets and shoulder pads, which allow the person delivering these hits to walk away unscathed. Without this modern equipment, players would instinctively calibrate their hits because of their sense of self-preservation, and football tackles would look a lot more like rugby tackles.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby gh » Wed Oct 09, 2013 8:47 pm

my DVR was otherwise occupied on Tuesday night; thank goodness my local PBS station decided to rerun it again on one of their lesser sub-channels. They're not good at all about making things available if you miss them first-time round.

Can't wait to watch it (DVR wasn't busy tonite, but I was; we're still trying to arrange a date :mrgreen: )

I doubt the thin-helmets idea would ever fly, but taking faceguards off would certainly make one more circumspect about where one stuck one's hed, methinks (not an original idea of mine).
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby jhc68 » Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:27 pm

The father of a high school classmate of mine was an All-American who later played in the NFL in the post-war period immediately before face masks came into vogue.
He broke his nose so thoroughly and so many times that by the time I knew him he could push his nose into any direction and it would stay there like a piece of putty.
And he was actually a very smart guy and shrewd business man.
Point being that doing away with safety equipment won't make players more cautious.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby Dixon » Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:54 pm

Nobody has to be a football player, boxer, bull rider, race car driver, MMA fighter. If you decide that's what you really wanna do it's now on you. You know the risk involved.

Now with that said....

I played HS ball and never used my helmet for anything, you do not need the helmet for anything other than what's it's for. I never lowered my head and tried to ram someone with it or hit a receiver with it, and it was so easy not to do.

The NFL needs to start suspending players who can't tackle and try to knock ball carriers down with helmet hits, no ball carrier has any business trying to knock somebody down with his head. If called for a helmet hit in a game they are gone and then they sit out the next with no pay and a huge fine.

ESPN had a segment not so long ago dedicated to monster hits. Look at how the fans and teammates react to big hits, that is the game. We saw that Clowney hit how many times, hell I saw it again today and that happened a year ago. Monster hits are football, you cannot play the game without them. You can play the game without using the hemet as a weapon however.

The real problem with football is the size and speed and strenght of the modern players. And that stupid artifical turf. Yank that stupidity out if anyone is really worried about players safety.

If I were coming out of college and knew my next stop was the NFL I'd make it very clear I'm not playing for a team with an artifical surface, who could blame me?

Once the crowd starts yelling..."hey stupid"..instead of..."wow!!!!!"...the helmet hits will stop,
Last edited by Dixon on Thu Oct 10, 2013 4:36 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby bambam » Thu Oct 10, 2013 4:02 am

I saw a suggestion I really like - that football start to institute some penalties like hockey, whereby you have to sit out a certain period of time in the game for hits that are illegal or dangerous - a penalty box. This would get coaches really starting to teach the players to not do this. More severe infractions would also get banned for the next game, etc.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby Pego » Thu Oct 10, 2013 4:58 am

jazzcyclist wrote:Hits to the head are already outlawed at all levels of football.


Yes, but often not enforced. Way too often. Also use of helmets as a projectile weapon. I should have been more precise :wink: .
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby jazzcyclist » Thu Oct 10, 2013 5:27 am

jhc68 wrote:Point being that doing away with safety equipment won't make players more cautious.

How do you explain the lack of violent collisions in rugby?
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby jazzcyclist » Thu Oct 10, 2013 5:31 am

Pego wrote:Yes, but often not enforced. Way too often. Also use of helmets as a projectile weapon. I should have been more precise :wink: .

The biggest offenders today are offensive players. I've seen Adrian Peterson lower his head many times. The NFL needs to start penalizing offensive players for spearing as conistently as it penalizes defensive players.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby gh » Thu Oct 10, 2013 5:47 am

jazzcyclist wrote:
jhc68 wrote:Point being that doing away with safety equipment won't make players more cautious.

How do you explain the lack of violent collisions in rugby?


I'm not sure that's the case; no end of bells rung there, and in Aussie Rules Football. As pointed out earlier, one big difference is the size of the people involved and how fast they're moving when they hit each other (the old force equation in action).
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby jazzcyclist » Thu Oct 10, 2013 5:49 am

Dixon wrote:I played HS ball and never used my helmet for anything, you do not need the helmet for anything other than what's it's for. I never lowered my head and tried to ram someone with it or hit a receiver with it, and it was so easy not to do.

I wish I could say the same thing about myself but I would be lying. The thing that I remember is that the coaches loved it. It was like they were going to have an orgasm when you put someone to sleep. Looking back, I also now realize that I had a few concussions, starting in little league, but back then we called it getting "your bell rung", and you would sit out for a few plays and then go back in, no big deal. Dixon, how many times do you remember getting "your bell rung" when you played football?

By the way, my high school, which this year has the nation's #1 overall football recruit, was in ESPN's featured high school game last Friday night.

http://insider.espn.go.com/blog/ncfrecr ... -augustine
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby Dixon » Thu Oct 10, 2013 5:59 am

jazzcyclist wrote:
Dixon wrote:I played HS ball and never used my helmet for anything, you do not need the helmet for anything other than what's it's for. I never lowered my head and tried to ram someone with it or hit a receiver with it, and it was so easy not to do.

I wish I could say the same thing about myself but I would be lying. The thing that I remember is that the coaches loved it. It was like they were going to have an orgasm when you put someone to sleep. Looking back, I also now realize that I had a few concussions, starting in little league, but back then we called it getting "your bell rung", and you would sit out for a few plays and then go back in, no big deal. Dixon, how many times do you remember getting "your bell rung" when you played football?

By the way, my high school, which this year has the nation's #1 overall football recruit, was in ESPN's featured high school game last Friday night.

http://insider.espn.go.com/blog/ncfrecr ... -augustine


The hardest I was ever hit was on punt returns, before I could get up to speed..WHAM!!!!!!!!!! But the single hardest hit was actually in a flag football game (city league) guy hit me right across mt nose with a forearm, knocked me to my knees,I saw stars and planets and.....

I saw that game, took me awhile to figure out....brothers! The size with speed combo.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby jazzcyclist » Thu Oct 10, 2013 7:16 am

Dixon wrote:The hardest I was ever hit was on punt returns, before I could get up to speed..WHAM!!!!!!!!!! But the single hardest hit was actually in a flag football game (city league) guy hit me right across mt nose with a forearm, knocked me to my knees,I saw stars and planets and.....

I saw that game, took me awhile to figure out....brothers! The size with speed combo.

Are you saying that you only recall getting two concussions in all your years of playing football?
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby Dixon » Thu Oct 10, 2013 7:30 am

jazzcyclist wrote:
Dixon wrote:The hardest I was ever hit was on punt returns, before I could get up to speed..WHAM!!!!!!!!!! But the single hardest hit was actually in a flag football game (city league) guy hit me right across mt nose with a forearm, knocked me to my knees,I saw stars and planets and.....

I saw that game, took me awhile to figure out....brothers! The size with speed combo.

Are you saying that you only recall getting two concussions in all your years of playing football?


Sorry didn't mean to give that impression, I'd say at least 4/5 times I couldn't walk to the sidelines alone. But back then it was like you said.....just had my bell rung...no biggie.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby no one » Thu Oct 10, 2013 9:19 am

Assuming Drs Omalu and McKee's research is accurate - (45/46 positives!), and given the NFL is "claiming no admission of liability or weakness of claims" (per settlement), how many prospective football players (little league/midget, HS, College, Pro) or their parents in the case of HS), will opt out of playing the game?

Another question is, those of you who have children who are aspiring football players, does this info have any bearing on play vs no play?

Will this info have any appreciable impact on business as usual?

I'm not sure the jury is ready to rule ...
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby jazzcyclist » Thu Oct 10, 2013 9:50 am

I've heard a number of current and former pro football players, including Super Bowl MVP Kurt Warner, who have said they will discourage their sons from playing football. I even heard one player say that he's playing football so that his sons won't have to, which reminds me of something that a coal miner, or someone in some other dangerous profession, might say.

Also, there are pro football players whose family want them to stop playing.

Jermichael Finley doesn’t have to watch “League of Denial” to have second thoughts about his profession, and what it means to his family.

The Packers tight end was stopped in his tracks when he got home from a game against the Bengals earlier this year, in which he suffered a concussion.

His 5-year-old son Kaydon had written him a note which said: “I’m glad you got off the field. Because that hit looked nasty.”

The next night, as he was putting Kaydon to bed, the message became even clearer.

“He said, ‘Daddy, I want you to stop playing football,’” Finley told Jason Wilde of ESPNWisconsin.com. “It was one of those things where you’re like, ‘That’s crazy that a 5-year-old would say that.’ The violence, the intensity of the game …

“I get calls from my grandma all the time. I tell her I only want to play 8 to 10 more years, and she says, ‘Boy, you need to quit this dang game.’

“That’s the thing. I know the risks. But family members that care about you, they see it from a different perspective than we do.”

That’s part of the reason Finley doesn’t let his son play football, and wonders if he’ll ever feel comfortable.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... -football/
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby scottmitchell74 » Thu Oct 10, 2013 2:03 pm

I played HS ball and never used my helmet for anything, you do not need the helmet for anything other than what's it's for. I never lowered my head and tried to ram someone with it or hit a receiver with it, and it was so easy not to do.


That's exactly my memory of HS football. I live in Texas now, and the guys I work with all say that the coaches actually teach them to his facemask first. Insane! I've called "B.S." on this, but they swear it's true. Sounds like irresponsible coaching. I remember being taught in Ohio to drive your shoulder through the other guy and keep your helmet to the side. It was called form tackling.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby DrJay » Thu Oct 10, 2013 7:17 pm

I didn't see the show....don't see that Rocky Mtn PBS has it teed up in the next few days. Can't say I've seen any former NFLers or recent DI players, just old people getting demented from non-head injury causes. I think I did have, in the past, a couple of old guys who played for Oklahoma and Nebraska in about the 1930s or 1940s. Kinda shrunken old men, but even in their prime they might have been smaller than today's defensive ends and safeties.

Recently saw as a patient the daughter of an older doc I worked for in 1994-95. I also see her husband. Apparently their son is approaching football age, whatever age that may be, and she asked me if I had any data about this kind of stuff as she is opposed to her son playing and her husband is all gung-ho for it. I just told her to look at Sports Illustrated, the TV, and Google and it's all over the place. I suggested wrestling (and track!) and wished her luck.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby jazzcyclist » Thu Oct 10, 2013 8:16 pm

scottmitchell74 wrote:
I played HS ball and never used my helmet for anything, you do not need the helmet for anything other than what's it's for. I never lowered my head and tried to ram someone with it or hit a receiver with it, and it was so easy not to do.


That's exactly my memory of HS football. I live in Texas now, and the guys I work with all say that the coaches actually teach them to his facemask first. Insane! I've called "B.S." on this, but they swear it's true. Sounds like irresponsible coaching. I remember being taught in Ohio to drive your shoulder through the other guy and keep your helmet to the side. It was called form tackling.

I concur with your co-workers about the facemask-in-the-chest technique being commonly coached at the little league and high school level when I was growing up.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby cullman » Thu Oct 10, 2013 9:57 pm

DrJay wrote:I didn't see the show....don't see that Rocky Mtn PBS has it teed up in the next few days...

The PBS website has the full documentary as well as extras: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline ... of-denial/
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby Blues » Thu Oct 10, 2013 10:23 pm

jazzcyclist wrote:
scottmitchell74 wrote:
I played HS ball and never used my helmet for anything, you do not need the helmet for anything other than what's it's for. I never lowered my head and tried to ram someone with it or hit a receiver with it, and it was so easy not to do.


That's exactly my memory of HS football. I live in Texas now, and the guys I work with all say that the coaches actually teach them to his facemask first. Insane! I've called "B.S." on this, but they swear it's true. Sounds like irresponsible coaching. I remember being taught in Ohio to drive your shoulder through the other guy and keep your helmet to the side. It was called form tackling.

I concur with your co-workers about the facemask-in-the-chest technique being commonly coached at the little league and high school level when I was growing up.


Our HS coach in Pennsylvania was sold on what he called "butt tackling", so we were taught to tackle face first. His rationale was: "You won't miss a tackle if you butt your helmet (face first) right into the numbers of the ball carrier.." Not sure how true that theory was, but the team had several concussions and neck injuries each year, and my nose was broken twice in practice during butt tackling drills since I had a narrow two-bar wide receiver face mask designed for optimum vision that offered little protection to the upper face...
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby 26mi235 » Fri Oct 11, 2013 6:03 am

scottmitchell74 wrote:
I played HS ball and never used my helmet for anything, you do not need the helmet for anything other than what's it's for. I never lowered my head and tried to ram someone with it or hit a receiver with it, and it was so easy not to do.


That's exactly my memory of HS football. I live in Texas now, and the guys I work with all say that the coaches actually teach them to his facemask first. Insane! I've called "B.S." on this, but they swear it's true. Sounds like irresponsible coaching. I remember being taught in Ohio to drive your shoulder through the other guy and keep your helmet to the side. It was called form tackling.


I lived in Texas for a couple years 30 years ago and can believe that football is still King, and all that implies, including the incentives that the coaches perceive. I am strongly disinclined to have my son play football, even though he is bugging me about it. If he were playing and reported coaches telling players to use their heads incorrectly I would tell them that I will get quotes and if any player suffers a concussion from playing I would do the following:

1) get data on the correlations between concussions and lessened mental capabilities; 2) get data on the medical costs; 3) use the models that my company uses for calculating damages; treble them because the conduct is willful and on-going; and 4) sue the coach personally (maybe the team as well, but clearly communicate to the coaches that they are at substantial personal financial risk for their behavior). Further, that is unlikely enough that any waivers will relive them of that burden that they should discount it when figuring the potential cost to themselves [the institution is unlikely to save them because they probably have an official policy that discourages such use of the head].

It is this change in incentives that is necessary to get the coaches to change their behavior.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby jazzcyclist » Fri Oct 11, 2013 6:48 am

I don't think that when I was coming up coaches taught dangerous blocking and tackling techniques because of disregard for player safety, they taught them because it was probably the way they were taught when they played and they didn't know any better. Coaches back in those days simply weren't aware of the effects that multiple concussions could have on a player's long-term health. That information has only become widely known in the last five years. I would be shocked if any high school or little league coach is teaching those same techniques these days.
Last edited by jazzcyclist on Fri Oct 11, 2013 8:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby gh » Fri Oct 11, 2013 8:41 am

local NFL writer in his weekly column praised the documentary, but added, "but it fumbled the ball in the red zone by never mentioning the players' union, which did nothing over the years to protect the players who were paying it dues."
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby jazzcyclist » Fri Oct 11, 2013 8:56 am

Folks thought Robert Smith was crazy when he walked away from the sport at the relatively young age of 28, at the height of his powers as the NFC's leading rusher, and all set to sign that one big, long-term contract that all NFL players dream of getting at least once in their careers. As time goes by and more information comes out, I'm guessing there are a lot of other players who wish they would have walked away from the sport earlier than they did.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby DrJay » Fri Oct 11, 2013 8:58 am

cullman wrote:
DrJay wrote:I didn't see the show....don't see that Rocky Mtn PBS has it teed up in the next few days...

The PBS website has the full documentary as well as extras: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline ... of-denial/


Thanks!
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby gh » Fri Oct 11, 2013 9:43 am

Dixon wrote:.. But back then it was like you said.....just had my bell rung...no biggie.


And this is exactly the mindset that is literally killing people. It IS a biggie.

And while thinking it's no big deal at the time may prove how "tough" you are, CTE doesn't respect toughness; everyone is an equal-opportunity victim, no matter how macho.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby jazzcyclist » Fri Oct 11, 2013 10:22 am

gh wrote:
Dixon wrote:.. But back then it was like you said.....just had my bell rung...no biggie.


And this is exactly the mindset that is literally killing people. It IS a biggie.

And while thinking it's no big deal at the time may prove how "tough" you are, CTE doesn't respect toughness; everyone is an equal-opportunity victim, no matter how macho.

But back then people didn't know about CTE, and that's the point I was trying to make. People thought that as soon as your your cognition was fully restored, you were 100% cured. There was a time when people in the petrochemical industry used to wash their hands with benzene because no one knew that it was a carcinogen. Thankfully, by the time I came along, that information was known, the industry had modified its practices and procedures accordingly, and today benzene is treated with the utmost respect.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby gh » Fri Oct 11, 2013 11:12 am

even with CTE now "common knowledge" I'd wager that the majority of "football people" still place a higher value on being a tough guy than they do about preserving mental health.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby jazzcyclist » Fri Oct 11, 2013 11:38 am

gh wrote:even with CTE now "common knowledge" I'd wager that the majority of "football people" still place a higher value on being a tough guy than they do about preserving mental health.

I don't know if it's a majorty or not, but currently, attitudes are fluid and moving in the direction of caution, as evidenced by the fact that more and more players are walking away from the game at the college and pro level, after deciding that they don't want to risk any more consussions.

Houston QB David Piland quits playing because of concussions

Two Arizona linebackers retire due to concussions
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby gh » Fri Oct 11, 2013 12:15 pm

depending on how you read between the lines in the Arizona case, they may not have had much choice

<<at the advice of their doctors, their football career is over.”>>

Doesn't the NCAA (probably because of liability concerns) have pretty strict no-more-play rules regards concussions? I seem to recall a rash lately of local women basketball/soccer/volleyball types who have been forced to step away from the game.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby Dutra5 » Fri Oct 11, 2013 7:28 pm

My son is playing football at an FCS school currently and I worry about him getting through his college career with no head injuries. He's a WR so he doesn't have the banging on every play that the front 7 of a defense does but I still worry. He's had a severe knee injury which has him redshirting this season.

I was on the coaching staff during his youth league days and the players were taught the proper technique although there were some who absolutely refused to do it and led with their helmets. I suggested removing the kids from games but the kids were effective and the DC looked at me as if I was out of my mind.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby Dutra5 » Fri Oct 11, 2013 7:33 pm

gh wrote:even with CTE now "common knowledge" I'd wager that the majority of "football people" still place a higher value on being a tough guy than they do about preserving mental health.


Ever read an NFL message board? To the leadheads, Roger Goodell is evil incarnate....not for denying CTE issues....but for taking their game away with his helmet to helmet rules.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby Dixon » Fri Oct 11, 2013 11:50 pm

gh wrote:
Dixon wrote:.. But back then it was like you said.....just had my bell rung...no biggie.


And this is exactly the mindset that is literally killing people. It IS a biggie.

And while thinking it's no big deal at the time may prove how "tough" you are, CTE doesn't respect toughness; everyone is an equal-opportunity victim, no matter how macho.


No it wasn't a biggie at that time. What does a player do, go sit down and tell the coach you can't play because you got dinged? Keep in mind I am talking another time/world.

The bottom line is everyone knows what can happen to you out there. Just like a boxer. You can't go around all..."I might get hurt"...hell, just stay in doors if you feel that way. If a kid wants to be a football player he's accepting that risk. We all know it.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby Dixon » Fri Oct 11, 2013 11:54 pm

gh wrote:even with CTE now "common knowledge" I'd wager that the majority of "football people" still place a higher value on being a tough guy than they do about preserving mental health.


Absolutely!!!!!!!

Here comes Brandon Jacobs all knees and shoulder pads and 264 pounds coming at you. you're a 200 pound cornerback, what do you do, go hide? Hell no, you hit him low and hard. If you break his leg or knock yourself out....oh well....that's football. A sport never meant to be played about guys this big, strong and fast.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby jazzcyclist » Sat Oct 12, 2013 7:48 am

gh wrote:depending on how you read between the lines in the Arizona case, they may not have had much choice

<<at the advice of their doctors, their football career is over.”>>

Doesn't the NCAA (probably because of liability concerns) have pretty strict no-more-play rules regards concussions? I seem to recall a rash lately of local women basketball/soccer/volleyball types who have been forced to step away from the game.

Whether it was the players' decision or the doctors' decision, this wasn't happening 20-30 years ago, so attitudes have definitely changed for the better.

This morning here was an excellent segment on this very topic on College Gameday. David Pollack said that the attitude of trying to tough out concussions, lest your teammates think that you're a wimp, seems to be rapidly fading away from the environment of today's football locker rooms. Lee Corso said that he thinks removing the facemasks from helmets would help, noting that he played in the pre-face mask era and went through his football career concussion-free, albeit with multiple broken noses and separated shoulders. According to Chris Fowler, doctors are now recommending that kids not play tackle football until they're 14 years old. Desmond Howard and Kirk Herbstriet both pointed the finger at ESPN for highlighting violent hits like the Jadaveon Clowney hit over and over, and thereby perpetuating the culture among football players to blow people up. They also did a feature on LSU offensive lineman Josh Williford who walked away from the game after suffering three concussions in two years, but is being allowed to keep his scholarship until he graduates. The NCAA could also help by not counting players like Williford against a football programs scholarship limitation.
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Re: Frontline: League of Denial

Postby Dutra5 » Sat Oct 12, 2013 7:53 am

Dixon wrote:
The bottom line is everyone knows what can happen to you out there. Just like a boxer. You can't go around all..."I might get hurt"...hell, just stay in doors if you feel that way. If a kid wants to be a football player he's accepting that risk. We all know it.


....and...as we all can attest....kids always make the most rational, well thought out decisions.
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