2013 Tour de France


A place for the discussion of all things not closely related to the sport and its competitive side. (as always, locked for the duration of major international championship)

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby jazzcyclist » Thu Jul 18, 2013 8:14 pm

DrJay wrote:How many times has the Tour winner not won a stage? (I know Froome has won stages this year.)

I believe Greg LeMond (1990) is the lone member of that club.
jazzcyclist
 
Posts: 10860
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby bambam » Fri Jul 19, 2013 1:35 am

So yesterday and on Ventoux Froome and Sky (Porte) deliberately broke the rules in the last X km by going back to the team car for food and water. They were fined a few $100, which means nothing to them, and yesterday penalized 20 seconds, which in the grand scheme of things also means very little.

So why is this not as bad as doping? They know the rule. They are deliberately breaking it to gain an advantage - the other teams and riders are following the rules. Froome even admitted he was bonking yesterday without sugar when he was interviewed. Why not penalize them 5 minutes or something really meaningful? Why not disqualify them and ban them from the sport for 2-years for deliberately breaking a known rule? I think what they did yesterday was an egregious offense, given that they had already done it on Ventoux, been penalized for it, and clearly knew they were breaking the rule.
bambam
 
Posts: 3848
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Durham, NC

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby jazzcyclist » Fri Jul 19, 2013 5:31 am

I kind of see where you're going with this. If Froome was really bonking, then this was a rule violation that directly affected the outcome of the race. If he had not broken the rule, he might have lost the Tour. On the other hand, if historically, this type of offense has always been treated as a misdemeanor, it would be wrong to start treating it as a felony without any prior warning.
jazzcyclist
 
Posts: 10860
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby lonewolf » Fri Jul 19, 2013 7:51 am

I admit ignoramity about cycling... do the rules required cyclists to carry water and "snacks" for the entire stage on their person/bike?
lonewolf
 
Posts: 8816
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Indian Territory

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby Master Po » Fri Jul 19, 2013 8:21 am

jazzcyclist wrote:I kind of see where you're going with this. If Froome was really bonking, then this was a rule violation that directly affected the outcome of the race. If he had not broken the rule, he might have lost the Tour. On the other hand, if historically, this type of offense has always been treated as a misdemeanor, it would be wrong to start treating it as a felony without any prior warning.


I get bambam's point, and yours. It is odd, at least imo, that such a practice that can really affect the outcome of the competition is on the one hand recognized as a rules infraction, but on the other hand is hardly sanctioned within the rules of the competition. (And, I'll add that this is my first knowledge of this particular practice/rules infraction in the Tour, so I truly know nothing else about this matter. Would be interested to read discussion from jazzcyclist and/or anyone else in the know.)
Master Po
 
Posts: 2640
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: north coast USA

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby jazzcyclist » Fri Jul 19, 2013 8:30 am

lonewolf wrote:I admit ignoramity about cycling... do the rules required cyclists to carry water and "snacks" for the entire stage on their person/bike?

No, there are designated feed zones where athletes are allowed to pick up food and drinks. It's done this way for saftey reasons, since it could be dangerous if many athletes were fumbling around with extraneous items close to the finish line after the hammer has already gone down and everyone on the peleton is fighting for position. There's no reason why an athlete should ever bonk in the Tour, since there are plenty of opportunities to get all the foor and drink they want before the hammer goes down.
jazzcyclist
 
Posts: 10860
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby lonewolf » Fri Jul 19, 2013 9:21 am

Thanks, jazz, that makes sense.
lonewolf
 
Posts: 8816
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Indian Territory

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby DG » Fri Jul 19, 2013 1:38 pm

Technically, only Porte broke the rule. ( you' re allowed to take food only not from the follow car at that point).
Froome, claimed car trouble, that he could not eat in time.

Belgium and Dutch television claimed, that if Froome was really bonking it would be to late anyhow because , it takes time to work after eating. (However, another source on dutch reportage claimed that if you feel the hunger coming up and you eat something, you could be in time in replenishing your energy)
DG
 
Posts: 45
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby jazzcyclist » Fri Jul 19, 2013 5:14 pm

DG wrote:Belgium and Dutch television claimed, that if Froome was really bonking it would be to late anyhow because , it takes time to work after eating. (However, another source on dutch reportage claimed that if you feel the hunger coming up and you eat something, you could be in time in replenishing your energy)

I'm sure most riders at that level have bonked enough times to know when they're in trouble. Froome may not have actually bonked yet, but he obviously felt the situation was dire enough to risk being penalized, and according to his post-race comments, he feels the 20 seconds was well worth it.
jazzcyclist
 
Posts: 10860
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby lonewolf » Fri Jul 19, 2013 7:12 pm

Next dumb question: What is "bonkng"?
lonewolf
 
Posts: 8816
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Indian Territory

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby jazzcyclist » Fri Jul 19, 2013 7:45 pm

I know it when I feel it, but since I can't put it into words, here's a link to an article that explains it better than I can:

http://www.runnersworld.com/nutrition-r ... age=single

If you participate in enough endurance activities (cycling, running, etc.) for long enough, you'll eventually experience it. Bonking shouldn't be confused with blowing up, which is what happens when your body gets overcome with lactic acid. Bonking means that you've depleted you body's glycogen storage. It's when the bridge (brain) says to the engine room (legs), "we need more power", and the engine room responds to the bridge, "we have none left".
jazzcyclist
 
Posts: 10860
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby lonewolf » Sat Jul 20, 2013 2:04 am

Hmmmm????? I am not a distance runner. Everytime I run a 10K, about half way through I keep asking myself, "WTF am I doing here" and suffer through the rest of the race. I don't think that is bonking but I do think I bonked one time during a 10K when I went out too ambitiously and have no recollection of running the last mile, woke up sitting in the shade with an IV in my arm.. but I finished he race and have a finish photo looking kinda wildeyed..
lonewolf
 
Posts: 8816
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Indian Territory

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby dj » Sat Jul 20, 2013 7:22 am

Jazzcyclist, What's with the little LSU banner at the finish of today's stage?!?
dj
 
Posts: 6200
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby jeremyp » Sat Jul 20, 2013 8:06 am

Interesting article about fans and fan behavior in the NY Times. Watching the climbs when these guys have to cycle through that gantlet (or should I say unruly mob?) is nerve racking. My wife suggested that each bicycle wheel be equipped with those scythes they had in Ben Hur. And she's a demure English girl! To me it's like being in a bar with a bunch of drunks. They think they're funny, but how do they feel if they watch a video of it the next morning? There isn't anything like this in any other sport is there! I've tried to get male friends interested in just tuning in once but they look at me with: "Watch cyclists in France, why?"
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/20/sport ... ports&_r=0
Last edited by jeremyp on Sun Jul 21, 2013 12:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
jeremyp
 
Posts: 4543
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Florida

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby bushop » Sat Jul 20, 2013 8:24 am

jeremyp wrote:Watching the climbs when these guys have to cycle through that gauntlet (or should I say unruly mob?) is nerve racking.

I saw a spectator push another spectator into the leading rider during a climb... shocking.
bushop
 
Posts: 1868
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: near the toys and tape measures

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby bambam » Sat Jul 20, 2013 8:43 am

lonewolf wrote:Hmmmm????? I am not a distance runner. Everytime I run a 10K, about half way through I keep asking myself, "WTF am I doing here" and suffer through the rest of the race. I don't think that is bonking but I do think I bonked one time during a 10K when I went out too ambitiously and have no recollection of running the last mile, woke up sitting in the shade with an IV in my arm.. but I finished he race and have a finish photo looking kinda wildeyed..


Jazzy's description is pretty darn good. Bonking is one of those things that you know it when it happens to you but is hard to describe if you haven't felt it. It is literally having no energy left to turn over the pedals.
bambam
 
Posts: 3848
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Durham, NC

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby dj » Sat Jul 20, 2013 8:55 am

bambam wrote:Jazzy's description is pretty darn good. Bonking is one of those things that you know it when it happens to you but is hard to describe if you haven't felt it. It is literally having no energy left to turn over the pedals.


Similar (same?) as heat prostration/exhaustion. By the time you know it''s coming on it's too late to prevent it.

I remember (too well) running an August 3M on a black macadam track, no shade, 90+ degrees. A pack of us (inc. A-As Bill Luov and Tim Cook--early '70s) went out very comfortably in 5:30. Running in the middle of the pack I just wanted to get to the outside or front, if only to feel air (no wind that day) moving over me. A two second per 440 increase in pace for about 330y left my legs with nothing and by the end of the quarter I trailed the original pack by a rapidly increasing 30y, with no ability to do a thing about it.
dj
 
Posts: 6200
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby bambam » Sat Jul 20, 2013 3:00 pm

dj wrote:A two second per 440 increase in pace for about 330y left my legs with nothing and by the end of the quarter I trailed the original pack by a rapidly increasing 30y, with no ability to do a thing about it.


When you bonk on a mountain stage cycling you can easily lose 1 minute per km - it happened one time to Armstrong during his tour "victories" and he dropped about 3 minutes in the last few kilos.
bambam
 
Posts: 3848
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Durham, NC

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby jazzcyclist » Sat Jul 20, 2013 4:14 pm

bambam wrote:
dj wrote:A two second per 440 increase in pace for about 330y left my legs with nothing and by the end of the quarter I trailed the original pack by a rapidly increasing 30y, with no ability to do a thing about it.


When you bonk on a mountain stage cycling you can easily lose 1 minute per km - it happened one time to Armstrong during his tour "victories" and he dropped about 3 minutes in the last few kilos.

It was at the Col de Joux-Plane in 2000 and Ullrich is the one who took time out of him. I was there that day, and took pictures of both Armstrong and Ullrich about 50 meters from the summit.
jazzcyclist
 
Posts: 10860
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby 26mi235 » Sat Jul 20, 2013 7:27 pm

Correct, bonking is running out of fuel, the kind that can be converted with any real speed. The first time it happened to me I was going across the San Gabriel Mountains from Pasadena (circa 1970). I had no real idea what it was but barely got to a place where I could get food. Afterward each mile was really hard until over a couple of miles it was so much better. Thereafter, I would occasionally bonk, but I knew what it was. Knowing what you have to do is not always enough to forestall it, as it can be hard to take in enough fuel while riding and it can take a fair bit of skill in the middle of a race.

Cycling has a range of rules and a range of infractions. In a time trial you are supposed to stay out of the slipstream of another bike and if you do not there are time penalties that depend on the duration, speed, etc. I thought that they should apply the penalty to the riders that gained by breaking the rule and they did that; Froome did recover some but not completely.

In a stage race getting adequately fueled and recovered day after day is a really big deal. One reason Armstrong did well is that they paid a lot of attention to doing this well, bringing along their own chefs etc. They have since been copied by most of the teams. Froome's high cadence style is copied (in a general sense) from Armstrong; it aids in day-to-day recovery because the muscles fibers are not stressed quite as much as when you mash big gears.
26mi235
 
Posts: 16334
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Madison, WI

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby bambam » Sat Jul 20, 2013 11:57 pm

26mi235 wrote: Froome's high cadence style is copied (in a general sense) from Armstrong; it aids in day-to-day recovery because the muscles fibers are not stressed quite as much as when you mash big gears.


Correct. Armstrong became known for his high-cadence after his cancer recovery. But I think Froome's rides an even higher cadence on the mountain climbs than Armstrong did. His turnover when he has pulled away has looked like even as high as 120. I heard he is only using a 27 or 29 cog on his climbs. Pantani once said that no true climber ever needs anything smaller than 39 x 23.
bambam
 
Posts: 3848
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Durham, NC

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby jazzcyclist » Sun Jul 21, 2013 4:08 am

26mi235 wrote:In a stage race getting adequately fueled and recovered day after day is a really big deal. One reason Armstrong did well is that they paid a lot of attention to doing this well, bringing along their own chefs etc. They have since been copied by most of the teams.

I don't think the idea of bringing along chefs came from U.S. Postal. The night before I saw Armstrong bonk at the Col de Joux-Plane, I happened to be staying at the same hotel as the Kelme team, and I met their chefs in the hotel restaurant that night. This was 2000, and at the time, people still had doubts about Armstrong, since most of the top riders were missing in 1999 and Alex Zulle lost most of his time in the crash on the Passage du Gois.

Also, during the first couple years of Armstrong's reign, U.S. Postal had one of the smallest budgets in the peleton, especially in 1999, when they had perhaps the smallest. This is why I shake my head every time I hear that blowhard Travis Tygart accuse U.S. Postal of running the most sophisticated doping program in the history of sports, because there's doubt that during the beginning of Armstrong's reign, there were teams (eg. Telekom, Once, Banesto, Kelme, Saeco, etc.) with much bigger budgets and presumably more sophisticated doping programs.

On a side note, does it seem to anyone else that there have been an unusually large number of mechanical problems with the bikes this year?
jazzcyclist
 
Posts: 10860
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby bambam » Sun Jul 21, 2013 7:19 am

jazzcyclist wrote:This is why I shake my head every time I hear that blowhard Travis Tygart accuse U.S. Postal of running the most sophisticated doping program in the history of sports, because there's doubt that during the beginning of Armstrong's reign, there were teams (eg. Telekom, Once, Banesto, Kelme, Saeco, etc.) with much bigger budgets and presumably more sophisticated doping programs.

On a side note, does it seem to anyone else that there have been an unusually large number of mechanical problems with the bikes this year?


Tygart has obviously never heard of the German Democratic Republic.

Hadn't noticed anything especially regarding mechanical problems.

I hate it when the Tour ends. I look forward to watching it every nite and on weekend mornings.
bambam
 
Posts: 3848
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Durham, NC

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby az2004 » Sun Jul 21, 2013 10:00 am

I don't follow cycling but this colombiaan kid who won on Saturday, is he the next big think in the sport once he gets experience will he be a big winner

or is it all about cheating anf not getting caight seemed the kid has advantage of birth and living at altitude
az2004
 
Posts: 3131
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby jazzcyclist » Sun Jul 21, 2013 10:17 am

az2004 wrote:I don't follow cycling but this colombiaan kid who won on Saturday, is he the next big think in the sport once he gets experience will he be a big winner

or is it all about cheating anf not getting caight seemed the kid has advantage of birth and living at altitude

He did well, but he's not the first Columbian, or cyclist from a high altitude region of the world, to make some noise in the peleton, but he's going to have to improve his time-trialing if he's going to ever win a grand tour. And don't forget that Froome was born and raised in Nairobi.

By the way, the French are really putting on a show for the finale of the 100th Tour. It took me a while to figure out what was going on this morning when I turned on the TV and NBC Sports was showing a replay from yesterday.
jazzcyclist
 
Posts: 10860
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby az2004 » Sun Jul 21, 2013 10:43 am

I know next to nothing about cycling

watching the climbs can have drama froom took off with about a k to go, and them the Colombian kid went after him caught hm and won the race for the day

I saw he was 2nd ovwerall and his first time in the tour
az2004
 
Posts: 3131
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby jazzcyclist » Sun Jul 21, 2013 11:48 am

Mark Cavendish had a good run, but there's no doubt that we have a new sprint king, and his name is Marcel Kittel. The king is dead, long live the king.
jazzcyclist
 
Posts: 10860
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby bambam » Sun Jul 21, 2013 12:38 pm

jazzcyclist wrote:It was at the Col de Joux-Plane in 2000 and Ullrich is the one who took time out of him. I was there that day, and took pictures of both Armstrong and Ullrich about 50 meters from the summit.


I think I remember seeing you there, jazzy. Weren't you the guy who ran alongside all the leaders and then mooned everybody?
bambam
 
Posts: 3848
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Durham, NC

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby DG » Sun Jul 21, 2013 1:21 pm

Poor Lieuwe Westra, 39 km before the finish he needed to quit the tour because of illness.

It was raining flat tires on the champs-elysees (more then a dozen).
DG
 
Posts: 45
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby br » Sun Jul 21, 2013 1:37 pm

The pay day for a TDF winner is not what you would think, at least not to me, for 3 week's work.

"When Andy Murray steps on to Centre Court at Wimbledon tomorrow, he will be playing for a £1.6m ($2.5m) pay cheque. If Chris Froome wins the Tour de France, he will collect €450,000 ($590,000)."

Here is a money breakdown for the jersey and stage winners: http://roadcyclinguk.com/racing/tour-de ... rison.html

Here is a link to the team payrolls. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-07-1 ... -race.html

Eleven Tour de France team payrolls in euros, according to the latest published financial statements of their parent companies or estimates from team executives:

BMC Racing 15 million euros (2013 estimate)
Team Sky 13.2 million euros (2011)
Team Saxo Bank 9.01 million euros (2012)
Garmin-Sharp 7.28 million euros (2013 estimate)
Omega Pharma 6.55 million euros (2011)
Cannondale 6.24 million euros (2012)
Francaise des Jeux 6.07 million euros (2012)
Movistar 5.91 million euros (2011)
Cofidis 4.46 million euros (2011)
Europcar 4.08 million euros (2012)
Sojasun 2.13 million euros (2011)
br
 
Posts: 478
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby az2004 » Mon Jul 22, 2013 9:57 am

qintana is the kid i'd root for in the future

given the cheating in the past a newbie is nice to see..

there is also a 20 year old kid who manu is looking at too, whay;s going on in colombia
az2004
 
Posts: 3131
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby DrJay » Mon Jul 22, 2013 10:27 am

bambam wrote:I hate it when the Tour ends. I look forward to watching it every nite and on weekend mornings.


I was thinking yesterday, as the show ended, how it's like the end of March Madness for us Tar Heels and Blue Devils. I was a'settin' in my fellow UNC fan's kitchen in 2009 waiting for the championship game to start and I said, "It's been a long month" and he replied, "I know....I'm TIRED!"

Guess it's worse if you're an NHL fan and your team goes all the way. The Stanley Cup playoffs go on FOREVER.
DrJay
 
Posts: 5485
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Woodland Park, CO

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby DrJay » Mon Jul 22, 2013 10:31 am

lonewolf wrote:I admit ignoramity about cycling... do the rules required cyclists to carry water and "snacks" for the entire stage on their person/bike?


There are also group pee breaks in the middle of long, flat stages, the timing of which I guess is either determined by the guy in the yellow jersey or by consensus in the peloton.

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=tou ... tedIndex=0
DrJay
 
Posts: 5485
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Woodland Park, CO

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby DrJay » Mon Jul 22, 2013 10:33 am

jeremyp wrote:Interesting article about fans and fan behavior in the NY Times. Watching the climbs when these guys have to cycle through that gantlet (or should I say unruly mob?) is nerve racking. My wife suggested that each bicycle wheel be equipped with those scythes they had in Ben Hur. And she's a demure English girl! To me it's like being in a bar with a bunch of drunks. They think they're funny, but how do they feel if they watch a video of it the next morning? There isn't anything like this in any other sport is there! I've tried to get male friends interested in just tuning in once but they look at me with: "Watch cyclists in France, why?"
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/20/sport ... ports&_r=0


I think the riders should start carrying little cans of mace.
DrJay
 
Posts: 5485
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Woodland Park, CO

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby DrJay » Mon Jul 22, 2013 10:46 am

jeremyp wrote:Interesting article about fans and fan behavior in the NY Times.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/20/sport ... ports&_r=0


"To Tour novices, particularly Americans, the behavior of fans is mind-boggling. “This just could not happen in the States,” said Kate Phillips, 45, whose husband, an Army officer, was recently transferred to Europe. 'Americans are so cautious. They would have barriers everywhere.'”

Not quite true. The fans here in Colorado for the first two US Pro Cycling Challenge (now called US Pro Challenge) races have been every bit as rabid as in France. Smaller numbers, but still numerous and vocal, camping out ahead of the mountain stages, crowding the riders on the climbs, acting a bit crazed, hanging out alongside the team buses as they discharge their riders before the start of each stage. The riders have compared the response favorably to Le Tour. Looking forward to the announcement of the entrants for this year's race (Aug 19-25).
DrJay
 
Posts: 5485
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Woodland Park, CO

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby bambam » Mon Jul 22, 2013 11:38 am

DrJay wrote:
lonewolf wrote:I admit ignoramity about cycling... do the rules required cyclists to carry water and "snacks" for the entire stage on their person/bike?


There are also group pee breaks in the middle of long, flat stages, the timing of which I guess is either determined by the guy in the yellow jersey or by consensus in the peloton.

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=tou ... tedIndex=0


Peloton rules, such as pee breaks, are dictated by the "patron" (pronounce puh-TRON) - basically the leader of the peloton. This is not necessarily the yellow jersey. Only certain, hugely respected riders are considered the patron. Hinault was one - LeMond never was, partly because he was American in an era when that was an outcast in the Tour. Armstrong was the patron. Merckx was, of course, the patron of all patrons. In addition to pee breaks, patrons set standards about when to wait for a fallen rider, when to attack a fallen rider, when to chase a breakaway, etc. In the absence of a definite patron, the yellow jersey probably is in charge.
bambam
 
Posts: 3848
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Durham, NC

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby jazzcyclist » Mon Jul 22, 2013 12:23 pm

I would add that another duty of the patron is to grant favors to other riders, like allowing a rider to ride alone in front of the peleton if the Tour is going through his hometown. Of course they also dish out punishments, such Amrstrong's infamous "disciplining" of an Italian cyclist in the 2005 Tour for discussing drugs with the media. The patron is also usually an older rider, so despite his success in this year's Tour, I doubt that Froome is the patron. More likely it was someone like Cadel Evans or Alberto Contador.
jazzcyclist
 
Posts: 10860
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby DrJay » Sun Aug 04, 2013 5:35 am

Still waiting on most of the teams to announce their riders for this month''s Pro Challenge race here in Colorado but Team Sky is sending Froome and Porte, among others:

www.cyclingnews.com/news/froome-confirm ... -challenge
DrJay
 
Posts: 5485
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Woodland Park, CO

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby shivfan » Sun Sep 29, 2013 11:00 pm

'Team Sky cyclist Jonathan Tiernan-Locke has been notified of a potential discrepancy in his "biological passport data" by the sport's governing body. The Sunday Times reported that he has been asked by the International Cycling Union (UCI) to explain suspect blood values. Team Sky said the 28-year-old Briton has withdrawn from racing "whilst his response to the UCI is prepared".'

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/cycling/24321502

This is the guy who won the Tour of Britain last year....
shivfan
 
Posts: 2588
Joined: Thu Sep 10, 2009 3:30 am
Location: Just outside London

Re: 2013 Tour de France

Postby 26mi235 » Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:50 pm

Yes, but there are some parties that looked closely at his data and did not see anything that was a red flag (his new team - Sky, and Vaughters). This one is not a 'positive' and I would be cautious about reading anything in to it right now, especially because they have gotten some pushback on the bio-passport and might not want a case that is not very clean/clear.

http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/former-endura-manager-defends-tiernan-locke

At the same time both Garmin and Sky expressed interest in signing Tiernan-Locke for 2013. According to Smith, Garmin tested Tiernan-Locke. The American team has a staunch anti-doping policy and test every rider before offering them a contract. With no biological passport tied to Tiernan-Locke due to his team’s ranking, the rider was invited to the team’s base in Girona for testing.

“We had a no-doping policy and talked openly within the team about that. We signed up to Bike Pure and we wanted to be seen as a clean team and that came right from the top. So we made sure everyone was looked after and that anyone could come to us is strict confidence if they wanted to talk. There were no problems whatsoever,” said Smith.

“Then in early April we were contacted by Garmin and I spoke to Jonathan Vaughters about it. We were also approached by Brailsford and he asked my thoughts at that time. I said John was the real deal and that we didn’t see there being any problems.”
26mi235
 
Posts: 16334
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Madison, WI

Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests