Are you an old geezer if:


A place for the discussion of all things not closely related to the sport and its competitive side. (as always, locked for the duration of major international championship)

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby tandfman » Mon Sep 17, 2012 6:10 pm

you refer to jeans as dungarees.

(I broke myself of that lifelong habit a few decades ago, when I found that my use of that word tended to stop all conversations cold and cause the people I was with to stare at me as if I had just stepped out of a time machine.)
tandfman
 
Posts: 15043
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby gh » Mon Sep 17, 2012 8:29 pm

dungarees, I'm thinking, was also very much a regionalism.
gh
 
Posts: 46335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am
Location: firmly at Arya's side!

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby tandfman » Tue Sep 18, 2012 5:40 am

gh wrote:dungarees, I'm thinking, was also very much a regionalism.

What say you on this, lonewolf?
tandfman
 
Posts: 15043
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby lonewolf » Tue Sep 18, 2012 7:00 am

If so, the term "dungarees" never reached my region.

Pre-WWII, most rural boys in Oklahoma wore bib overalls. (Roundhouse and OshKosh) As jeans came into favor, we would buckle the shoulder straps around our waist in imitation of jeans, commonly called Levis because that was the prevailing brand.
I spent the first 21 years of my life in Oklahoma wearing overalls and "blue jeans". The next 60 years living in 8 states and 2 foreign countries. I have read the term "dungarees", without knowing exactly what type trousers/pants it referred to but I do not recall ever hearing "jeans" called dungarees.
lonewolf
 
Posts: 8816
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Indian Territory

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby Conor Dary » Tue Sep 18, 2012 8:38 am

In an episode of The Rockford Files, the plot of the story involves a secret Russian formula for long wearing jeans. The Navy officer who is involved in the story calls them dungarees.
Conor Dary
 
Posts: 6297
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: कनोर दारी in Ronald MacDonald's Home Town, and once a Duck always a Duck.

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby Anthony Treacher » Tue Sep 18, 2012 9:39 am

....if you go on about dungarees.

In the UK 'dungarees' might be recognized as children's combined bib and trousers, a sort of playsuit, at a stretch an adult's work clothes. And not only made of American denim jeans material but even of corduroy. And not only blue colour but brown, or green. I think during WWII the girls of the British Women's Land Army wore dungarees, which still did not detract from the girls' popularity with Italian POWs. The word obviously came from India. In the UK I do not think people would associate dungarees with jeans trousers as in the US.
Last edited by Anthony Treacher on Tue Sep 18, 2012 11:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Anthony Treacher
 
Posts: 57
Joined: Mon Jul 05, 2010 10:48 am
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby tandfman » Tue Sep 18, 2012 11:47 am

lonewolf wrote:If so, the term "dungarees" never reached my region.

Pre-WWII, most rural boys in Oklahoma wore bib overalls. (Roundhouse and OshKosh) As jeans came into favor, we would buckle the shoulder straps around our waist in imitation of jeans, commonly called Levis because that was the prevailing brand.
I spent the first 21 years of my life in Oklahoma wearing overalls and "blue jeans". The next 60 years living in 8 states and 2 foreign countries. I have read the term "dungarees", without knowing exactly what type trousers/pants it referred to but I do not recall ever hearing "jeans" called dungarees.

Thank you, lonewolf. Not that I doubted gh, but he's a bit younger than we are, and I thought that maybe it was more a question of age than region. Growing up in the East, I always referred to jeans as dungarees and I never realized that was not what everyone called them. I rarely saw bib overalls except on certain workmen, and I don't think I ever owned any. I probably would have called them overalls, rather than dungarees, which I thought of as denim pants.

Interesting comments on this subject here (scroll down):

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dungaree
tandfman
 
Posts: 15043
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby gh » Tue Sep 18, 2012 3:15 pm

For a great analysis of regionalisms, check out this interactive map of North America to see the distribution of carbonated beverages as soda, pop, or coke.

http://www.popvssoda.com

I grew up in the Pacific Northwest calling it pop, had it turn into soda in California, and then married a woman from upstate New York who was also a pop girl.
gh
 
Posts: 46335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am
Location: firmly at Arya's side!

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby gh » Tue Sep 18, 2012 3:18 pm

ooh-ooh! An even more refined chart..... soft drink by county!

http://www.popvssoda.com/countystats/total-county.html
gh
 
Posts: 46335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am
Location: firmly at Arya's side!

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby marknhj » Tue Sep 18, 2012 3:26 pm

gh wrote:For a great analysis of regionalisms, check out this interactive map of North America to see the distribution of carbonated beverages as soda, pop, or coke.

http://www.popvssoda.com

I grew up in the Pacific Northwest calling it pop, had it turn into soda in California, and then married a woman from upstate New York who was also a pop girl.


When I moved over here in 1985 I was quite shocked to discover some words in the general vernacular that I assumed hadn't been used since the 1950-70's. Off the top of my head, four were: pop, soda, pot and dude. I'm sure I'll think of some more.
marknhj
 
Posts: 5070
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby gh » Tue Sep 18, 2012 3:46 pm

gnarly, man!
gh
 
Posts: 46335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am
Location: firmly at Arya's side!

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby lonewolf » Tue Sep 18, 2012 4:41 pm

Interesting pop/soda/coke map.. my recollections is that the common term for soft drinks in SW OK was either "pop" or "soda pop" or, generically, "coke" but do not recall term "soda " being in common use.

I am puzzled by the "soda" islands in Cherry and Garden Counties, NE, Coffey Co, KS and Jackson Co., OK

Curious what "other" is.
lonewolf
 
Posts: 8816
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Indian Territory

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby tandfman » Tue Sep 18, 2012 5:43 pm

gh wrote:For a great analysis of regionalisms, check out this interactive map of North America to see the distribution of carbonated beverages as soda, pop, or coke.

http://www.popvssoda.com

I grew up in the Pacific Northwest calling it pop, had it turn into soda in California, and then married a woman from upstate New York who was also a pop girl.

According to that other map, showing usage by county, she would have been from the extreme Western part of upstate New York. (Upstate New York refers generically to all of the state North and West of NYC and its close suburbs. Most of upstate NY is soda country.)
tandfman
 
Posts: 15043
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby tandfman » Tue Sep 18, 2012 5:51 pm

lonewolf wrote:Interesting pop/soda/coke map.. my recollections is that the common term for soft drinks in SW OK was either "pop" or "soda pop" or, generically, "coke" but do not recall term "soda " being in common use.

I don't think I've ever heard "coke" being used generically to include any flavored carbonated beverages. That seems very strange to me.

But the strangest example of that sort of thing that I've ever come across was in Kenya, about 10 years ago, when I realized that the locals there referred to any road or cross-country race of any distance as a "marathon". I've since seen this strange usage even in print--a few months ago I saw a mention in a Nairobi newspaper of a marathon. Reading the story closely, I figured out that the race in question was actually a 10K.
tandfman
 
Posts: 15043
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby lonewolf » Tue Sep 18, 2012 7:21 pm

Happens in US papers too.. unenlightened reporter calling almost any race longer than a mile or two a "marathon"
lonewolf
 
Posts: 8816
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Indian Territory

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby dj » Tue Sep 18, 2012 9:24 pm

lonewolf wrote:Happens in US papers too.. unenlightened reporter calling almost any race longer than a mile or two a "marathon"


Was very common in US papers to call any road race a "marathon" or a "modified marathon" until post-WWII, perhaps later. Even Boston and NYC papers referred to road races that way, and they were in the heart of US marathon country.
dj
 
Posts: 6200
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby preston » Wed Sep 19, 2012 5:46 am

Coke? Pop? Soda pop? Those are easy; they give you some idea of what you're talking about. But the first time someone asked, "is there a bubbler around here?" I was completely stumped.
preston
 
Posts: 1075
Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2011 1:09 pm

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby tandfman » Wed Sep 19, 2012 6:28 am

I'd have thought they were talking about Champagne or something similar.
tandfman
 
Posts: 15043
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby lonewolf » Wed Sep 19, 2012 6:40 am

preston wrote:Coke? Pop? Soda pop? Those are easy; they give you some idea of what you're talking about. But the first time someone asked, "is there a bubbler around here?" I was completely stumped.

Obviously one of the "others".
lonewolf
 
Posts: 8816
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Indian Territory

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby gh » Wed Sep 19, 2012 7:34 am

I first heard bubbler only a few years ago in a discussion of amenities at the Olympic Trials. Wiki explains why it would crop up in Eugene.

<<..."Bubbler" is still used as a generic term in several regional dialects of the United States, originating in eastern Wisconsin and remaining well-known throughout the state. The term is still widely used in Australia. Oregon is also known to be quite familiar with the term, specifically in the Portland region where in the late 1800s Simon Benson installed 20 fountains, which are now known in the Portland area as "Benson Bubblers". It is also commonly used in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. The terms "water fountain" and "drinking fountain" are much more commonly used in the remainder of North America....>>

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubbler
gh
 
Posts: 46335
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am
Location: firmly at Arya's side!

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby jeremyp » Wed Sep 19, 2012 12:12 pm

I texted my daughter the other day and we were arguing (nicely) about something so I texted "sfu." She showed it to the gkids and got a "grandpa!!!" back. IMHO In some things I am not a geezer. I'm also catching on to the Brit phrase" one off" which I like.
jeremyp
 
Posts: 4543
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am
Location: Florida

Re: Are you an old geezer if:

Postby tandfman » Wed Sep 19, 2012 1:03 pm

I guess I am an old geezer. I just Googled sfu and of course got lots of hits for Simon Fraser University. There is an internet slang website, which finally made things clear, although I might have guessed.
tandfman
 
Posts: 15043
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests