The girl with the dragon tattoo


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Re: The girl with the dragon tattoo

Postby jeremyp » Mon Sep 06, 2010 10:00 am

Giant Panda wrote: I think it's perfectly reasonable if someone has a preference for watching a drama in their native language, it means they can get the full gist of the performances better. And I doubt anyone in the UK or USA read the book in Swedish. Why are we okay with translations of books but not films?
I'm not sure what you mean by translating a film? Are you talking about going back to dubbing? God forbid.
I can almost see an argument for not having subtitles. If you want to watch a foreign film, watch it in the original language, and without text cluttering up the photography.
And understand it how? 75% of the movies I watch via Netflix have subtitles. 95% of these movies will never be remade by Hollywood. All they need to do with subtitles is use their brains and keep them yellow for a white background.

As to the remake of this particular series it makes sense as the vast majority of American viewers will not go to a movie with subtitles. Some of it's the difficulty they have with multi tasking, but much of it's due to bias, pure and simple. To make my point on this latter issue: In my condo we have a movie night. The vast majority will not watch a foreign movie with subtitles but will insist that they watch American movies with captions, due to their hearing impairment.
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Re: The girl with the dragon tattoo

Postby Marlow » Mon Sep 06, 2010 11:08 am

jeremyp wrote:the vast majority of American viewers will not go to a movie with subtitles.

Even the TOE hates sub-titles. I want to be immersed in the story, not reading the script with the actors. On the other hand, I do like it when American movies let 'foreigners' talk in their native tongue, and we see the translation on screen. For that reason I had no trouble with Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ in Aramaic or Klingons talking Klingon! :D
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Re: The girl with the dragon tattoo

Postby Daisy » Mon Sep 06, 2010 11:14 am

Marlow wrote:I want to be immersed in the story, not reading the script with the actors.

I hardly notice reading subtitles and usually get as immersed in the story as if the film was in English. I find I have the same experience reading a novel too.
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Re: The girl with the dragon tattoo

Postby jeremyp » Mon Sep 06, 2010 11:19 am

Daisy wrote:
Marlow wrote:I want to be immersed in the story, not reading the script with the actors.

I hardly notice reading subtitles and usually get as immersed in the story as if the film was in English. I find I have the same experience reading a novel too.


Ditto! Wait until Marlow needs hearing aids!
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Re: The girl with the dragon tattoo

Postby Marlow » Mon Sep 06, 2010 12:20 pm

jeremyp wrote:Wait until Marlow needs hearing aids!

What?!
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Re: The girl with the dragon tattoo

Postby bad hammy » Mon Sep 06, 2010 2:08 pm

All things being equal I prefer to avoid subtitles, but not to the the point where I am watching the movie dubbed (horrible) or not watching it. The only problem I run into is occasionally they switch out subtitles before I am done reading them - can't move my lips fast enough . . .
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