Why "Torino" and not "Turin"?


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Postby tafnut » Wed Dec 28, 2005 3:59 pm

it's pronounced "ed-en * bur-ro"

it means literally: "that on which Adam rode out of the Garden"
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Postby Daisy » Wed Dec 28, 2005 4:15 pm

tafnut wrote:it's pronounced "ed-en * bur-ro"

it means literally: "that on which Adam rode out of the Garden"

"bur-ro" So where did you get this? This is what i was trying to get at with borrow. Why 'ro' at the end? Have the Brits changed since 1700's or have the US?
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Postby tafnut » Wed Dec 28, 2005 5:17 pm

Daisy wrote:
tafnut wrote:it's pronounced "ed-en * bur-ro"

it means literally: "that on which Adam rode out of the Garden"

"bur-ro" So where did you get this? This is what i was trying to get at with borrow. Why 'ro' at the end? Have the Brits changed since 1700's or have the US?


OMG! Tell me you got the joke!!!
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Postby tandfman » Thu Jan 05, 2006 6:30 pm

utkvol80 wrote:The New York Times is using Turin.

So is the Wall Street Journal.
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