What do we think of the NBA dress code?


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Postby SQUACKEE » Thu Oct 27, 2005 9:50 am

the nba players are adults who can wear whatever they want 99.9 of the time, including arriving and leaving the stadium.

but if are gonna argue that the players should be allowed to dress during the game like a "bum" or a rap or punk star then i think you would also have no problem with, lets say the coach of the lakers, in a tank top and shorts during the game. why does the caoch have to wear a suit and not the players!
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Postby OwenSamuela15 » Thu Oct 27, 2005 9:59 am

twittering debutante wrote:These NBA guys have been pampered their entire lives, at least as long as their basketball prowess became known.

None of these guys have ever worked a 9-5 job and none will ever have to.

If I were making 3.8 million dollars a year (NBA avg salary) to play 82-100 games and my boss asked me to put away my pimp outfits until the season was over, I'd be down at the Armani store real quick.

When you've got professional jackasses like Iverson making 20 million annually say he;d like a clothing stipend, it's easy to realize none of these spoiled crybabies will ever get it.


Please make an attempt to get your facts straight before you slander people for things they didn't say. Iverson's responses to the dress code have all followed the line of the old adage "the clothes don't make the man, the man makes the clothes." Marcus Camby and Brevin Knight are the ones suggesting a stipend. Iverson doesn't make 20 million dollars a year. 5.3 million was the league average last season not 3.8 million. If you believe that all players in the NBA have taken that movie script road to get to where they are then you are a fool. You've been watching too many movies like 'Blue Chips.'

The "no do-rags" aspect of the dress code could be viewed as racist; do-rags are worn to keep your hair presentable. I have not seen a caucasian athlete in the NBA wearing one yet. Often during a game, athletes with braids have them frazzled due to contact and sweat. To some they look "thuggish" and this is due to their own perception. It is important to know that not everyone can pull back their hair or comb it after they get out of the shower. Do-rags are at times worn by bald people to obtain a certain look but in many cases they are necessary.

I respect tafnut for his open mind response and he appears to feel that way due to his present environment, hence, his perception is different and more accepting then others that might not have similar interaction with this new generation that is often referred to as the Hip Hop Generation. I think people forget about the likes of Bill Walton and his unkempt presentation during his era. Walton was often sporting tie die shirts with his wild beard and long wandering hair. Back then, individualism was valued. Let us not forget that individualism is what made a lot of these NBA players who they are today. Individualism can provide an edge. Should it be discouraged?

A model citizen and role model for all children is Tim Duncan. He is not considered by manor or style of play to be a part of Hip Hop Generation. Many find the Hip Hop Generation to be negative. Many felt the same way about the 70's. Tim Duncan plays as pure a form of basketball as we have every seen. Duncan openly contested the dress code yet no one has mentioned him. He was quoted as saying:

"I think it's a load of crap, I understand what they're trying to do with the hats and do-rags and jerseys and stuff. That's fine. But I don't understand why they would take it to this level. I think it's basically retarded. I don't like the direction they're going, but who am I?"

Duncan doesn't sound very "thuggish or pimpish" to me. Duncan likes to dress casual because it is comfortable to him. I think if the league MVP, winner of the Wooden Award and very upstanding role model is against the dress code then we should share his comments.

In my opinion, I see the players adhering to the dress code. In time maybe children will say "I want to make it to the NBA so I can dress in nice suits before and after every game." Wait a second though, isn't this possibly sending the wrong message? Isn't this stressing materialism and clothes making the man not man making the clothes? Will children start to focus on the way that they dress more? Won't this lead to other issues for the youth that do not have the means to dress properly? Didn't Iverson say:

"It sends a bad message to kids, If you don't have a suit when you go to school, is your teacher going to think you're a bad kid because you don't have a suit on?"

Have all of us in this thread asked ourselves:
"SHOULD TRACK AND FIELD ATHLETES CONFORM TO THIS SAME DRESS CODE?" The shoe is on the other foot now.
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Postby KevinM » Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:20 am

OwenSamuela15 wrote:Have all of us in this thread asked ourselves:
"SHOULD TRACK AND FIELD ATHLETES CONFORM TO THIS SAME DRESS CODE?" The shoe is on the other foot now.


I'd like to assume you are joking here and throughout your post, but I fear you are not.

Every time I left campus on the team van or bus when I was in college, I was wearing one of three outfits. If we were travelling directly to the meet (same day, no flight or hotel stay), I (and all of my teammates) would be wearing team-issued warm-ups. If we were driving to the hotel to stay overnight before a meet, I would be wearing a team-issued polo shirt, khakis, and "nice" shoes. If we were flying to a meet, I would have on a coat and tie.

I can't tell you how many times we bitched to our coach about this. I also can't tell you how many times strangers in airports, gas stations, etc. would tell my coach or me directly that we looked very respectable and represented ourselves and our university very well. Isn't that the goal here?
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Postby SQUACKEE » Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:24 am

>It sends a bad message to kids<

the message i see mostly toward kids is do, say and wear whatever you feel like. the truth , which these kids will find out later, is most jobs have a dress code. like i said i worked as a janitor for 8 dollars an hour and i HAD to wear a uniform or quit. maybe this "message" from the nba is not all bad?
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Postby gh » Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:38 am

KevinM wrote:...If we were flying to a meet, I would have on a coat and tie. I can't tell you how many times we bitched to our coach about this. I also can't tell you how many times strangers in airports, gas stations, etc. would tell my coach or me directly that we looked very respectable and represented ourselves and our university very well. Isn't that the goal here?


I'll never forget getting off the team bus on a college road trip, in our matching school blazers and a LOL asking us, "What choir are you with?" We wuz mortified!
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Postby No Name » Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:43 am

I think another relevant issue here is the message it sends to kids when NBA players dress like thugs. For better or worse, these players are role models, and kids look up to them. NBA players can get away with wearing what they want because they have a unique skill that enables them to make tons of money. Most people do not have this skill - they have to get real jobs. In most workplaces, you have to look presentable to be hired, let alone be successful in the job on an ongoing basis. If a job candidate walked into my company looking like some NBA players do, he/she would not get a job offer, regardless of whatever "sub-culture" he/she came from. I'm betting most other professional workplaces are the same.
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Postby OwenSamuela15 » Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:47 am

KevinM wrote:
OwenSamuela15 wrote:Have all of us in this thread asked ourselves:
"SHOULD TRACK AND FIELD ATHLETES CONFORM TO THIS SAME DRESS CODE?" The shoe is on the other foot now.


I'd like to assume you are joking here and throughout your post, but I fear you are not.

Every time I left campus on the team van or bus when I was in college, I was wearing one of three outfits. If we were travelling directly to the meet (same day, no flight or hotel stay), I (and all of my teammates) would be wearing team-issued warm-ups. If we were driving to the hotel to stay overnight before a meet, I would be wearing a team-issued polo shirt, khakis, and "nice" shoes. If we were flying to a meet, I would have on a coat and tie.

I can't tell you how many times we bitched to our coach about this. I also can't tell you how many times strangers in airports, gas stations, etc. would tell my coach or me directly that we looked very respectable and represented ourselves and our university very well. Isn't that the goal here?


KevinM,

Remember that we are talking about professional athletes not athletes on the collegiate level. I ran and played basketball on the collegiate level and we too presented ourselves well. On one occasion someone anonymously phoned our school's president to inform him of how well we represented our institution. Almost all of the athletes in the NBA adhered to a dress code in college, prep school or high school. In college I enjoyed dressing nicely as a team. However, back then we didn't have families and we were either living together or relatively close.

As far as the dress code goes, I feel that players should wear suits or slacks and sport coats to the game and on the bench if they are sidelined. I feel that when leaving they should be allowed to dress in whatever fashion they desire assuming the post game activities such as interviews and personal relations are concluded. I think that when there are certain team activities such as reading to the youth and basketball clinics; team issued warm ups should be worn. If you are on the clock then you should wear your team's logo. Lastly I feel that it is important for players to be seen on occasion in regular street clothes because it reminds the youth that they are ordinary people just like them. In my opinion, restricting do-rags and necklaces is pushing it.

The aforementioned was my personal opinion. My business opinion is different.
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Postby OwenSamuela15 » Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:49 am

SQUACKEE wrote:>It sends a bad message to kids<

the message i see mostly toward kids is do, say and wear whatever you feel like. the truth , which these kids will find out later, is most jobs have a dress code. like i said i worked as a janitor for 8 dollars an hour and i HAD to wear a uniform or quit. maybe this "message" from the nba is not all bad?


Serious question and I'm sure you know where I am going with it; How many uniforms did your job issue you?
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Postby OwenSamuela15 » Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:53 am

No Name wrote:I think another relevant issue here is the message it sends to kids when NBA players dress like thugs. For better or worse, these players are role models, and kids look up to them. NBA players can get away with wearing what they want because they have a unique skill that enables them to make tons of money. Most people do not have this skill - they have to get real jobs. In most workplaces, you have to look presentable to be hired, let alone be successful in the job on an ongoing basis. If a job candidate walked into my company looking like some NBA players do, he/she would not get a job offer, regardless of whatever "sub-culture" he/she came from. I'm betting most other professional workplaces are the same.


No Name,

When does the job start, on the way to work or at the office? Some players argue that the job starts when they enter the locker room and ends when they leave.
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Postby SQUACKEE » Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:57 am

that was a long time ago! mid 70's. we had a laundry service for the uniforms and i think we got 3 sets. i hated them. they were an ugly brown and beige and the worst part they had my name on the shirt! ouch! :x
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Postby OwenSamuela15 » Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:13 am

SQUACKEE wrote:that was a long time ago! mid 70's. we had a laundry service for the uniforms and i think we got 3 sets. i hated them. they were an ugly brown and beige and the worst part they had my name on the shirt! ouch! :x


Ouch indeed my friend. Ouch indeed. Referring to your post, one of these NBA players that are requesting a stipend might reference your job of the 70's. Let me say this before I get chewed apart, I do NOT think they should get a stipend. We all know there are some jobs that give new workers a stipend to use at certain stores though so it is not unheard of.
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Postby SQUACKEE » Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:28 am

if my wife is wearing a bikini at the beach nobody would think " why is she wearing that? its totally unapropiate!" but if she wore the exact same thing to a nice restaurant later that nite people would "flip out"

there maybe nothin "wrong" whatsoever with some of the attire worn by the players BUT is it unreasonable that the owners might find the garb unapropiate when representing the league?

having said all this i have been told a large part of my life how long my hair should be or what i should wear and a i hate it. so now i am a slob!!

I WIN :!: :!: :P :P :P
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Postby OwenSamuela15 » Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:40 am

SQUACKEE wrote:if my wife is wearing a bikini at the beach nobody would think " why is she wearing that? its totally unapropiate!" but if she wore the exact same thing to a nice restaurant later that nite people would "flip out"

there maybe nothin "wrong" whatsoever with some of the attire worn by the players BUT is it unreasonable that the owners might find the garb unapropiate when representing the league?

having said all this i have been told a large part of my life how long my hair should be or what i should wear and a i hate it. so now i am a slob!!

I WIN :!: :!: :P :P :P


I can respect that SQUACKEE!!!
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Postby DrJay » Thu Oct 27, 2005 2:47 pm

KevinM wrote:
OwenSamuela15 wrote:Have all of us in this thread asked ourselves:
"SHOULD TRACK AND FIELD ATHLETES CONFORM TO THIS SAME DRESS CODE?" The shoe is on the other foot now.


I'd like to assume you are joking here and throughout your post, but I fear you are not.

Every time I left campus on the team van or bus when I was in college, I was wearing one of three outfits. If we were travelling directly to the meet (same day, no flight or hotel stay), I (and all of my teammates) would be wearing team-issued warm-ups. If we were driving to the hotel to stay overnight before a meet, I would be wearing a team-issued polo shirt, khakis, and "nice" shoes. If we were flying to a meet, I would have on a coat and tie.

I can't tell you how many times we bitched to our coach about this. I also can't tell you how many times strangers in airports, gas stations, etc. would tell my coach or me directly that we looked very respectable and represented ourselves and our university very well. Isn't that the goal here?


On FSN's coverage of the 2003 NCAA xc meet, there was footage of the pre-meet press conference/interviews (Sat or Sun). RItz had on a plain white undershirt, black leather jacket (unzipped), and a wool hat (the interviews did not take place outdoors in the 10 F weather). He looked like a trashy generation X-er (I'd actually dress like that if it would make me run 27:38, but it won't!). Renee Metivier (also of CU) wore something like a turtleneck or sweater and wool blazer and looked like she could model for a women's clothing magazine. It was nice to see a top-level athlete like her dress like she cared, like she had some self-respect or pride or respect for the meet and the coaches and the press and her team and the whole process. Maybe it doesn't matter, but when all is said and done ("at the end of the day"--puke, vomit, gag) and when the race is over and the season is over and her running career is over, Renee will just be Renee, and I think we can tell something about the kind of life she'll lead from how she presented herself during that brief interview. I also think we can tell something about the kind of life Dennis Rodman and Marcus Camby and others do and will lead from how they present themselves and react to the dress code issue. Give me Renee's approach any day. Again, David Stern is entirely right if he wants to change the NBA's image. It's about marketing. It will not likely change the thuggish behavior of the relatively few players who may truly act (not dress) like thugs. It's the image Stern's after. Nobody's making these guys play NBA basketball. If they don't like it, let them get jobs as DJs at hip-hop nightclubs. (Funny how it is....anyone ever hear of a drive-by shooting outside a nightclub where, say, Neil Diamond or James Taylor or even a real hell-raiser--I'm being a little facetious here--like Neil Young was playing or hanging? Thought not.)
Last edited by DrJay on Thu Oct 27, 2005 5:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby DrJay » Thu Oct 27, 2005 2:51 pm

OwenSamuela15 wrote:
SQUACKEE wrote:if my wife is wearing a bikini at the beach nobody would think " why is she wearing that? its totally unapropiate!" but if she wore the exact same thing to a nice restaurant later that nite people would "flip out"



But she might start a real nice trend!
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Postby SQUACKEE » Thu Oct 27, 2005 3:17 pm

oh, believe me she would! 8) :wink: :P
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Postby DrJay » Fri Nov 11, 2005 12:22 pm

http://www.cnn.com/2005/SHOWBIZ/Movies/ ... index.html

What a surprise. Another gangsta-rap-inspired murder. Wouldn't want to step on any NBA players' toes with a dress code to distance the league from this crap, now would we? Maybe they should adopt a Disney theme. Anyone hear of any murders during a screening of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarves"?
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Postby OwenSamuela15 » Fri Nov 11, 2005 1:54 pm

DrJay wrote:http://www.cnn.com/2005/SHOWBIZ/Movies/11/11/film.get.rich.reut/index.html

What a surprise. Another gangsta-rap-inspired murder. Wouldn't want to step on any NBA players' toes with a dress code to distance the league from this crap, now would we? Maybe they should adopt a Disney theme. Anyone hear of any murders during a screening of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarves"?


From DrJay's article:


"It is not clear whether the individuals involved in the shooting had just left the screening of "Get Rich," which had started at 10 p.m., but Reid ackowledged that they had come from that direction."

"There was a lot of preparation done for this film after Paramount's research told us that it was drawing a primarily young male crowd," Reid said. "We had taken all the precautions possible to limit any possibility of violence, but I'm skeptical that the film itself incited it. I think it was more an issue where the wrong people came into contact with each other."


I wouldn't expect such vague support for an argument from seemingly an educated poster. I'm not a fan of Gansta Rap, I am a fan of Hip Hop music. I also have stated that I agree with enforcing a dress code. Let's be fair when seeking support for our statements. You amongst others are quick to criticize.

Al Pacino's Scareface is the staple movie amonst the gansta rap community. I'm not going to blame the Cubans and Columbians for the actions of many so called "gangstas." The common theme in both movies was drugs, violence and money. Pacino is allowed to hold a gun in his hand on the movies cover, 50 cent is forced to change his cover that originally depicted himself holding a gun to holding a newborn. Scareface is considered a classic. Let's be fair. Not everyone grew up with Snow White, Bambi and Peter Pan.
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Postby DrJay » Fri Nov 11, 2005 4:12 pm

"I wouldn't expect such vague support for an argument from seemingly an educated poster."

I'll take the latter bit as a compliment and say thanks. If I were in a jury box, you can be sure I'd listen to all the facts on both sides. Here, I'm just some dude on a message board and tend to believe in the "where there's smoke, there's fire" theory. Gangsta-rap glorifies violence. John Wayne movies did too, but I don't think we had an epidemic of young farmhands or cowboys blowing each other's brains out in the 1950s and 1960s. We do now have too many gangsta-rap wannabes maiming and killing each other and the glorification of it will make it even more acceptable, even normal, to a certain segment of the population. I believe the movie just opened. Let's see if things proceed calmly or not.
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