Historical Evolution of the High Jump


Forum devoted to track & field items of an historical nature.

Re: Historical Evolution of the High Jump

Postby jhc68 » Wed Jun 12, 2013 7:22 pm

Lots of Avant discussion at the High Jump History Questions thread... scroll way down on this forum.
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Re: Historical Evolution of the High Jump

Postby JayIsMe » Fri Jun 14, 2013 10:44 am

Dave wrote:I know that by the mid 60's, bags of foam rubber were common place in US high school pits. When were they likely to have appeared at higher levels.


A couple of illustrations from a blog in my local paper. This high schooler was a 6'8" straddler in 1973. Note the grass take off areas and the high-tech footwear. The third link is the local JC polevault pit during the same period. IIRC old airline seats were frequently used as pit material.

http://running.blogs.pressdemocrat.com/files/2013/06/Tom-Buzzard-1973.jpg

http://running.blogs.pressdemocrat.com/files/2013/06/Tom-Buzzard-73.jpg

http://running.blogs.pressdemocrat.com/files/2013/06/1977-JH-Champ-7-6.jpg
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Re: Historical Evolution of the High Jump

Postby jhc68 » Fri Jun 14, 2013 2:50 pm

I certainly saw lots of net covered sponge pits like those pictured.
The most life-threatening, though were inflatable pits that were briefly in vogue 30-40 years ago.
If the things leaked or if the air pressure gave out at the wrong time jumpers would land flat on the undersurface.
Another problem was the if you landed in the wrong spot on the balloon pit the thing would expand laterally and jostle the standard so the landing dislodged the bar.
Try explaining to a clueless volunteer official that such a jump was not a miss!
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Re: Historical Evolution of the High Jump

Postby Dave » Fri Jun 14, 2013 4:54 pm

jhc68 wrote:I certainly saw lots of net covered sponge pits like those pictured.
The most life-threatening, though were inflatable pits that were briefly in vogue 30-40 years ago.
If the things leaked or if the air pressure gave out at the wrong time jumpers would land flat on the undersurface.
Another problem was the if you landed in the wrong spot on the balloon pit the thing would expand laterally and jostle the standard so the landing dislodged the bar.
Try explaining to a clueless volunteer official that such a jump was not a miss!


I remember vaulting on those in grade school. They were great fun and life threatening.

Yes. They had pole vaulting in the grade schools in Ft. Wayne in the 60s.
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Re: Historical Evolution of the High Jump

Postby Jackaloupe » Fri Jun 14, 2013 8:51 pm

no one:Therefore if you accept the first 2 statements as true, it follows that ideally a jumper should approach the bar at a 90 degree angle, at high speed, IF (very big if) he can fins a way to drape his body over the bar.

No, no one, You're totally missing the key advantage of the Fosbury revolution: Not the backwards clearance per se, but the takeoff on the opposite foot, w/ a variant on Bob Barksdale's related technique. It's the conversion of Angular Momentum (Centrifugal Force) generated during that last 3 curving steps or so--whatever the tradeoff of somewhat slower forward speed. You simply won't see a successful Flopper who doesn't properly negotiate the curve.
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Re: Historical Evolution of the High Jump

Postby jhc68 » Fri Jun 14, 2013 9:24 pm

Aussie Tony Sneazwell straddling into a mountain of sawdust...

http://www.t3licensing.com/video/clip/48050225_9300.do
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