Who was third in the Dream Mile?


Forum devoted to track & field items of an historical nature.

Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby larwood » Wed Nov 12, 2003 6:11 pm

Everyone knows that Liquori beat Ryun in the 1971 dream mile. But who was third?
larwood
 
Posts: 86
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby tafnut » Wed Nov 12, 2003 6:52 pm

Byron Dyce 3:59.6
tafnut
 
Posts: 26684
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am
Location: Lost at C (-minus)

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Guest » Wed Nov 12, 2003 8:05 pm

Rich Ferguson of Canada in 4:04.6
Guest
 

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Guest » Thu Nov 13, 2003 12:50 am

Biggy daddy weave 4:02.2
Guest
 

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby larwood » Thu Nov 13, 2003 6:47 am

Mr. tafnut is of course correct.
It was Mr. D.
larwood
 
Posts: 86
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Guest » Thu Nov 13, 2003 7:26 am

THE dream mile during my lifetime that caught the world's attention was Landy and Bannister in Vancouver in 1954.
Guest
 

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby larwood » Thu Nov 13, 2003 7:29 am

That is swell but my question, if you read it, was about 1971.
larwood
 
Posts: 86
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Guest » Thu Nov 13, 2003 8:18 am

Correct.
Guest
 

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Guest » Thu Nov 13, 2003 8:50 am

I'm reporting in from an internet cafe in Paris. I knew the answer (really!) but lost a day in transit... I chatted at length with Dyce some 30 years ago--a very nice and intelligent man.
Guest
 

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Guest » Thu Nov 13, 2003 10:05 am

Byron is still a very nice and intelligent man, located in Gainesville, FL. He's still running, competing occasionally, head of the math dept. at Santa Fe CC, and photo-timing many meets around Florida for Half-Mile Timing(with Scott Peters). He's probably lurking on this web site.
trivia:Byron coached Jon Gill (prison miler) at SFCC.
Guest
 

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby larwood » Thu Nov 13, 2003 12:27 pm

For such a know-it-all kuha1 sure gets around!
larwood
 
Posts: 86
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Guest » Thu Nov 13, 2003 12:45 pm

>I'm reporting in from an internet cafe in Paris.>>

I know that if I were in Paris, I wouldn't be sitting in front of a danged computer screen!
Guest
 

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby ASDIP » Thu Nov 13, 2003 1:06 pm

I'll have a Kronenbourg!
ASDIP
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby larwood » Fri Nov 14, 2003 7:55 am

In response to Over 65, I agree that 1954 race really was a Dream Mile. I only called that 1971 race a 'Dream Mile' because that how it was billed then. While it was an exciting race, when Runner's World named it the mile of the Century, I could only conclude they were as nuts as when they named Johnny Kelley the Runner of the Century, which was the equivalent of naming Brabara Taylor Bradford the Writer of the 20th Century.
larwood
 
Posts: 86
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Guest » Fri Nov 14, 2003 10:05 am

Either T&FN or Runners World published a speculative ALL TIME (dream?) mile ... in the 60s or early 70s (I thinks 60s). I also believe Bert or Cordner Nelson wrote it. It pitted the greats from all/many eras (much like is often talked about on track/running boards, i.e., who's the best of all time etc). It was (again, I think) published about, or shortly after, Ryun's dominant 66-67 yrs.

The article was a recount of the race with strategy played out and splits (220 or 440?) It did 'post' individual times. I do not recall all the "invited participants" runners, but I do remember who "won." Pretty interesting read for die hards. and I don't have it.
Guest
 

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Guest » Fri Nov 14, 2003 10:06 am

"when Runner's World named it the mile of the Century, I could only conclude they were as nuts "


Agreed - we discussed Runners World at length in another thread and that publication is truly a joke.
Guest
 

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Guest » Fri Nov 14, 2003 1:26 pm

Hey--am I being defamed long-distance? I crossed the channel & am now in the home of the '08 and '48 Games. All this travel sure is dull compared to the T&FN message board! Cheers!
Guest
 

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Dennis » Fri Nov 14, 2003 7:23 pm

Actually the race in 1954 was referred to as the "Miracle Mile". I was in Vancouver recently and got to watch a tape of the race which was remarkable. Rich Ferguson was indeed third and, I think Murray Halberg was fifth in 4:07.0
Dennis
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Guest » Fri Nov 14, 2003 9:32 pm

Thank you Dennis for refreshing my memory. I appologize Larwood for my error.
Guest
 

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby larwood » Sat Nov 15, 2003 6:52 am

Au contraire (sp?) the apology is mine for being a bit rude. By the way, there is a great movie made in 1988 by Australian TV called the "Four Minute Mile". It is on VHS and is available on ebay. Following the exploits of Santee, Landy and Bannister, it is quite a remarkable movie and well worth hunting up. In my opinion, the best track movie ever made. (Sadly, that would not be very hard to do.)
larwood
 
Posts: 86
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Guest » Sat Nov 15, 2003 10:45 am

Howdy again. That '88 movie is really quite well done. I have it first hand from one of the principle subjects/characters that the scenes and dialogue are quite historically correct.
Guest
 

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Guest » Sat Nov 15, 2003 11:07 am

Thanks for the info Larwood. By the way, at the time that the 1954 Empire Games were taking place, I was on a train leaving Banff and heading towards Ontario. I knew then that I was going the wrong way. If I had gone the other way, I would have seen that miracle mile and Peters marathon collapse. I don't think Peters was ever the same after that day.
Guest
 

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Per Andersen » Sun Nov 16, 2003 12:35 am

All due respect to "The Miracle Mile" and the Liquori-Ryun race but I grew up in a time when the 4 minute mile really was a dream. The term was much used in the mid to late '40s and in the early '50s. But after the race at Iffley Road on May 6 1954 it stopped being a dream but a reality.
Per Andersen
 
Posts: 3737
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby larwood » Mon Nov 17, 2003 7:00 am

Thank you for your comment Mr. A. Perhaps, you should buy that movie that I mentioned above to relive all those dreams.
larwood
 
Posts: 86
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:32 am

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Per Andersen » Mon Nov 17, 2003 10:41 pm

Thank you,larwood. Yes I saw that movie and liked it a lot. I thought maybe Cerutty came across as too much of a madman.
If you have not already read it I will absolutely recommend Bannister's biography "The Four Minute Mile". Is the best sports bio I have ever read. You can do a search on www.powells.com
They had it for about 14$ last time I checked.
Spring of '54 was a great time to be a young track fan. Landy had finished the Aussie season and came to Finland about May 1 to train for a serious assault on 4minutes in June as the old cinder tracks in Scandinavia never were in top shape until early June. But of course Bannister beat him to it. Very exciting times before the Vancouver mile. Most of my friends and even my dad were for Landy but I was a always a Bannister fan. We knew about Santee but for some reason Landy was much more known. Looking back now I hold Bannister and Landy in the same high regard.
Per Andersen
 
Posts: 3737
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:31 am

Re: Who was third in the Dream Mile?

Postby Guest » Tue Nov 18, 2003 7:00 am

Per, I was at a Cerutty lecture in Culver City. He had some good ideas but he did come across as a bit strange. He jumped around a lot and he galloped across the stage to demonstrate how man should run like a horse. However, one can't argue with some of the results he got.
Guest
 


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: gm and 5 guests