Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?


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Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Tue Sep 16, 2003 12:27 pm

What's the best anchor leg takeover you ever saw? Mmy vote goes to Ashford over Goehr in Seoul. She made that girl appear as if she were standing still (the vernacular used to be "she put the hook in her back"). It is said Hayes ran a blinding anchor in Tokyo, but I did not see that live. King Carl ran some tremendous final legs, what a stride he had.

Am I the only one that would have used Michael Johnson in the 4 X 100 in world events? I think he frowned on it as an injury threat and time-consumer from 200,400 practice.

Carl Lewis was such a finisher in the 100, that when he applied his final kick in '88 and Ben Johnson still overtook him (Ben being to me, a 60 meter specialist, and too short to withstand Carl's "kick"),I sensed something wrong immediately. I turned to those watching it with me and said "When Carl Lewis changes gears, that never happens. Something funny is going on (I could tell Lewis could see Johnson peripherally the last 10 meters too, and HE looked surprised). But those viewing it w/ me didn't follow the sport closely. Any recollections?
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Tue Sep 16, 2003 11:34 pm

Hayes '64 must rank first, of course. In 4x4s, best come-from-behind winner might be Kriss Akabusi at Tokyo '91 (first GB win over US in 55 years)? any others?
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Powell » Wed Sep 17, 2003 1:33 am

I don't think Ashford's anchor was anything exceptional - Goehr was just in poor form (she didn't make the individual final in Seoul, while Ashford won silver - it was to be expected the American would be much faster in the relay). Akabusi's run wasn't that great, either - it's just that Pettigrew ran VERY poorly - their splits were 44.59 and 44.93, respectively.

I'm not old enough to remember Hayes, but from what I've read about the race, it must have been a great one... Another one I read about from that era was Ewa Klobukowska's anchor in the Budapest European champs in 1966 - reportedly making up 10 meters ! (but I've never actually seen the race, so I can't vouchsafe for that).

Of the ones I have seen, Christine Arron's anchor leg in the 1998 Europeans and the 2003 World's rank pretty high.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Wed Sep 17, 2003 8:49 am

The Hayes race was incredible, He was 5 down when he received the stick and 5 up when he crossed the finish line!
Does nayone remember the 1980 NCAA 4 X400 final? The University of Tennesee was in 7th place going into the anchor leg and Antone Blair got the baton and literally zig-zagged his way to first place right at the line.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby The King » Wed Sep 17, 2003 10:15 am

Hayes' was 'only' 3m down, and turned that deficit into a 3m lead...

But now matter how far Hayes' won by and how much he had to make up, that is the greatest 100m anchor ever...

How 'bout Christine Arron's 9.66s anchor in the Women's 4x100m final at the 1998 European Championships in Budapest???

She came from 5m down, to around 1-2m up on Irina Privalova!
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby gh » Wed Sep 17, 2003 5:34 pm

>>Does nayone remember the 1980
>NCAA 4 X400 final? The University of Tennesee was
>in 7th place going into the anchor leg and Antone
>Blair got the baton and literally zig-zagged his
>way to first place right at the line.>>

go to this thread

http://trackandfieldnews.com/tfn/discus ... essage=658

you'll find a detailed description of that exciting moment.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby tandfman » Wed Sep 17, 2003 6:23 pm

If you go back to the original question--what was the best anchor you ever saw--I have to eliminate Hayes, which was probably the most thrilling ever, and then I have a zillion to choose from, but one that I can't get out of my mind was the Nehemiah anchor in the 4x200 at the Penn Relays when he was still in college. No, it wasn't the OG or WC (I've seen a bunch of those, too), but more than two decades later, I still remember that more vividly than I do some of the others that have been mentioned. (Yes, I saw that Tennessee anchor as well.)
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Thu Sep 18, 2003 8:23 am

I don't know the excact details, but in 1989, while at a H.S. track meet, some guy was telling me about Michael Johnson and how he ran down someone (possibly Fredericks) in the 4X200 in a college meet with a 19.3 split. Does anyone have details about that race?
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby The King » Thu Sep 18, 2003 10:59 am

I don't know what meet exactly which you are talking about(I'll do some research on it),
but in College for his team, MJ did run an 18.5s ahnd-timed anchor leg for a 4x200m relay.

I'll have to check my ATFS 2002 Book for refferences.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Thu Sep 18, 2003 11:53 am

You might not think HS counts, but the 1990 Ohio HS 4x400 final is the best I've seen.

Shaker Heights had a quality 4x400 that was capable of running 3:15 (which is real darn fast when you get this far north). Dayton Dunbar had three guys and Chris Nelloms. Dunbar handed off in dead last, 50m back on Shaker Heights. Nelloms made up 49 of those 50 meters, and the Columbus Dispatch said his split was 44.8. Ohio Stadium got louder than it does for some football games. Shaker's anchor leg had to be sweating bullets!

If you're a Brit (or just sick and tired of Americans winning relays all the time) the 1991 WC 4x400 was pretty good, too.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby 6 5.5hjsteve » Thu Sep 18, 2003 12:00 pm

Glad to see the "Mile Relay" get into all this.

To me, what's exciting is when, in a Mile Relay, DISASTER STRIKES, also known as a dropped baton. Anyone have any good stories/recollections of thrilling races where a dropped baton is part of the mix ?
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Thu Sep 18, 2003 1:19 pm

I remember seeing that Antone Blair anchor in Austin, 1980 NCAA. The most impressive part was the number of people he passed in the last 100! I think 5 or 6, and weaving in and out between them.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Thu Sep 18, 2003 3:19 pm

Michael Franks in'85 world cup final. The single most amazing leg ever run in the history of mankind..........well I was young and impressionable, and it was pretty exciting.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby tandfman » Thu Sep 18, 2003 5:28 pm

Well, yes. but that WCup race was so screwed up that it was hard to know what would have happened without all of the jostling at that handoff.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby bhall » Thu Sep 18, 2003 6:17 pm

I log my entry for Derek Mills in the 1992 NCAA in Austin. Hammering past Baylor's Deon Minor and Ohio State's Chris Nelloms while holding off USC's Quincy Watts to anchor the second fastest collegiate time ever (4 or 5 100ths off the best) and become one of only two collegiage teams ever to fun under 3 minutes.

Derek is now retired from racing. A graduate from Georgia Tech in Computer and Electrical Engineering he is currently in the process of getting a joint MBA and JD at Tulane University.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Fri Sep 19, 2003 7:18 am

The 1991 World Championship had two stellar anchors.

Mens 4 x 400m - Great Britains Kris Akabusi tracking individual 400m champ Antonio Pettigrew of the USA and leading Great Britain to a famous victory.

Womens 4 x 100m - The great Merlene Ottey receiving the baton some 4 meters in arrears and blazing past East Germanys Heike Dreschler (who was no slouch) and Russias Irina Privalova to lead Jamaica to victory.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby The King » Fri Sep 19, 2003 11:26 am

>Glad to see the "Mile Relay" get into all
>this.



How about MJ's 42.94s 400m anchor leg during the Men's 4x400m relay 1993 Stuttgart World Championships???

That was very impressive, it's still the only ever sub-43.00s 400m anchor by a man or anyone!
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Fri Sep 19, 2003 12:00 pm

YES! YES! YES! I was there. It was actually in 1988 when Nelloms was a high school sophomore. Nelloms took the baton land tore out lik he was runnig the 4x 100 relay and just kept on going. Passin runner after runner and he got within' 5 yards of the leader and just ran out of room. Earlier that day Nelloms ran a 45.80 400 meter dash,breaking the national record for sophomores, and then coasted through the 200 in 21.04. Then-future Ohio State and Minnesota Vikings tailback finished 3rd in the open quarter that day with a 47.18 for Euclid (A suburb of Cleveland), and he was only a sophomore that year as well! Call me partial but I don't care, Ohio has always had the horses!
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Fri Sep 19, 2003 12:06 pm

You might not think HS counts, but the 1990 Ohio HS 4x400 final is the best I've seen.
Shaker Heights had a quality 4x400 that was capable of running 3:15 (which is real darn fast when you get this far north). Dayton Dunbar had three guys and Chris Nelloms. Dunbar handed off in dead last, 50m back on Shaker Heights. Nelloms made up 49 of those 50 meters, and the Columbus Dispatch said his split was 44.8. Ohio Stadium got louder than it does for some football games. Shaker's anchor leg had to be sweating bullets!


YES! YES! YES! I was there. It was actually in 1988 when Nelloms was a high school sophomore. Nelloms took the baton land tore out like he was running the 4x 100 relay and just kept on going. Passing runner after runner, when got within' 5 yards of the leader and just ran out of room. Earlier that day Nelloms ran a 45.80 400 meter dash,breaking the national record for sophomores, and then coasted through the 200 in 21.04. Then-future Ohio State and Minnesota Vikings tailback ; Robert Smith finished 3rd in the open quarter that day with a 47.18 for Euclid (A suburb of Cleveland), and he was only a sophomore that year as well! Call me partial but I don't care, The great state Ohio has always had the horses! (And great distance runners too).
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Fri Sep 19, 2003 12:18 pm

DIdn't Pettigrew get bumped by somebody in that race?
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Fri Sep 19, 2003 3:11 pm

Lightnin', Your adrenaline is getting the best of you and leaving you a little confused. The relay leg Jesse is talking about was in '90, Nelloms senior year. He did not pass runner after runner because he got the baton in 2nd. The Shaker Heights anchor was directly at the top of the turn when he got the baton. Smith was runner-up in the 400 that year, :46.03 is what I remember for him. Jesse will know, but I believe Nelloms ran in the :45.30 range as a soph at the state meet, but I could be confused to specific times as well. Jesse, The Columbus Dispatch was accurate as I split Nellom in :44.9. The outstanding thing about this is that the crowd was well over 30,000 primarily to see Nelloms run, and it was a deafening gasp as he sped the backstretch. I was always an admirer of the Lewis Olympic anchors. His '92 anchor made him look absolutely untouchable with a moving start.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Sat Sep 20, 2003 10:56 am

1985 World Cup 4x4 in Canberra deserves a mention when USA came from behind after a bad baton exchange. Was Wiley the anchor? I believe it decided the team score too.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Sat Sep 20, 2003 12:34 pm

Lightnin', Your adrenaline is getting the best of you and leaving you a little confused. The relay leg Jesse is talking about was in '90, Nelloms senior year. He did not pass runner after runner because he got the baton in 2nd. The Shaker Heights anchor was directly at the top of the turn when he got the baton. Smith was runner-up in the 400 that year, :46.03 is what I remember for him. Jesse will know, but I believe Nelloms ran in the :45.30 range as a soph at the state meet, but I could be confused to specific times as well. Jesse, The Columbus Dispatch was accurate as I split Nellom in :44.9. The outstanding thing about this is that the crowd was well over 30,000 primarily to see Nelloms run, and it was a deafening gasp as he sped the backstretch. I was always an admirer of the Lewis Olympic anchors. His '92 anchor made him look absolutely untouchable with a moving start.


First of all, my adrenaline is always pumped-up because Im' a high energy kind of guy, but what I speak of is dead accurate. In the 1988 Ohio High School Track and Field Championships. Chris Nelloms won the 100 meters in 10.66/ the 200 in 21.04/ the 400 (he also won as a freshman in 47.51) in 45.80 and his team finished in 2nd in the 4X400 relay behind Shaker Heights, 3.15.2? to 3.15.9? with Nelloms running an unofficial 44.8 split. All of this as a sophomore. Robert Smith (Euclid) finished 3rd in the 400 in 47.18. also in his sophomore. (A runner from Elyria finished 2nd in 47.0?). In the 1989 Ohio High School Track and Field Championships. Nelloms did not run the 100 he switched to the 110 meter high hurdles ahere he finished 2nd to Glenn Terry (Future Indiana star), I'll have to research their times. He repeated his 400 title running 46.34 and Smith was runner-up in 46.41/ and Nelloms again won the 200 in 20.90 to Smith's 21.10 second place. Smith won the 100 title in 89' with a 10.68. In 1990, Nelloms won the 110 high hurdles in the 13.6 range, the 400 in 45.59 and the 200 in 20.46. Smith was runner-up in the 100 to Mario Allmon from Cincinnati Princeton (10.48) and runner-up again to Nelloms in the 400 on 46.70. In the 4x400 relay, Nelloms was indeed in 2nd place when he received the baton, but quickly overtook the lead runner and his team went on the win in the 3,15.1 range. Nelloms split was in the 45.3 range that day.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Sat Sep 20, 2003 3:41 pm

Lightnin', The way you are throwing around those numbers, I've got to think it is me who has it a bit confused. Hard to argue with numbers/facts. I think I got off on the wrong tangent with the relay 'passing runner after runner' phrase. The Elyria runner who finished 2nd in '88 was Rod Moore. Moore beat Nelloms indoor 47.9 to 48.0 at the OSU Coaches Classic. Nelloms :45.36 must've been a regional/district mark. The interesting thing about Nelloms 110 HH national record, although inferior, is that he was not a very tall guy (5'7" or 5'8"), and that he picked that up as a secondary event only after he gained two teammates who could potentially place at state in the 100. I split Nelloms in an early season meet anchoring a sprint medley. He received the baton with an approx. 15 meter lead. He played around and let the pack catch him. He split :27.4. The pack formed around him, but no one would pass. At the 200 mark, Nelloms let loose finishing in :20.2 (moving start of course)& won by nearly 40 meters.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby The King » Sun Sep 21, 2003 3:56 am

Am I the only one that
>would have used Michael Johnson in the 4 X 100 in
>world events? I think he frowned on it as an
>injury threat and time-consumer from 200,400
>practice.

I would also use MJ in the 4x100m relay.
Because of his incredible speed endurance and speed maintenance I would either put him on 2nd or 3rd legs.
Possibly on 1st leg, when looking at his 1st 100m of his 19.32s from Atlanta.
As for anchor, I don't know.

My estimate times for each leg for MJ(when looking at his 100m,150m,200m,300m & 400m times) would be:
1st leg: 10.05s
2nd leg: 8.80s
3rd leg: 9.05s
4th leg: 8.75s
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby The King » Sun Sep 21, 2003 4:00 am

I have a couple of words.
Herb Mckenly of Jamaica, 44.6s 400m relay leg in the 1950's when the 400m WR at the time was 46.8s!
He was on the 3rd leg, he was handed the baton 10-20m down on the USA team at the start of his leg. He caught up and gave the JAM team a 5m lead!

What else can I say!
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Buckeye Burners

Postby Guest » Sun Sep 21, 2003 8:07 am

Interesting that So. Calif. and Northern Fla. were always thought of as prep sprint factories in track and field mags that listed prep bests- but Chris Nelloms and Edwin Moses were Dayton products,and Ohio also gave us Butch Reynolds, Willie Davenport,Paul Warfield (check your Big 10 long jump competitions),Robert Smith,Jesse Owens, Bones Dillard, De Hart Hubbard, and some great teams from schools such as Cleveland East Tech.
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Re: Buckeye Burners

Postby Guest » Sun Sep 21, 2003 9:06 am

Because of population and some solid youth programs getting a lot of young athletes hooked on success, rust-belt states like Ohio, NY, Penn., & Illinois have had their fair share of quality sprinters. I also think Ohio's strong high school coaching association does a great job in educating and preparing quality coaches for development of athletes particularly technically. However, add the great weather into the mix and California, Texas, & more recently Florida still rule in terms of quality depth.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby huh? » Sun Sep 21, 2003 9:49 am

>What's the best anchor leg takeover you ever saw?
Mmy vote goes to Ashford over Goehr in Seoul. She
made that girl appear as if she were standing
still (the vernacular used to be "she put the
hook in her back"). It is said Hayes ran a
blinding anchor in Tokyo, but I did not see that
live.<

That was the question that started this thread, and it just occurred to me that I (and lots of others) may have been misreading the question. By "saw" do you include "saw" on tv? And if you did see Ashford's race in Seoul only on tv, what difference does it make whether you saw it live or not? (In fact, I suspect that almost everything you saw on US tv from the Seoul Olympics was on delayed tape. So why eliminate Hayes if you saw his race on tv tape years after it happened instead of hours? Tape is tape.)

And if you were actually in Seoul, then I've got another question to ask, but I'll hold up on that because it's my guess that you weren't.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Sun Sep 21, 2003 11:00 am

>I have a couple of words.
Herb Mckenly of Jamaica, 44.6s 400m relay leg in the 1950's when the 400m WR at the time was 46.8s!
He was on the 3rd leg, he was handed the baton 10-20m down on the USA team at the start of his leg. He caught
up and gave the JAM team a 5m lead!>>

And another tale grows mightily in the telling. McKenley was indeed awesome-awesome-awesome but the World Record at the time (52 Olympics in Helsinki) was 45.7 (46.0 for 440y), not 46.8. Monster difference.

And U.S. had, according to TFN account, a 12y lead and McKenley had a half-yard lead when he handed off. Rhoden and Whitfield then matched 45.5s and in one swell foop the WR dropped from 3:08.2 to 3:03.9!
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Mon Sep 22, 2003 7:06 am

The Penn Relays Carnival year after year produce exciting devastating anchor legs in the various divisions. I am surprised that none of them have made it to this board. The most exciting anchor that I have witnessed came in the HS division of the boys 4 x 400m at the 1991 Penn relays. Four teams were involved in a stirring last leg battle with Henderson High (NJ?) resisting two Jamaican high schools Kingston College and Calabar. The Kingston anchor (I think he was Davian Clarke) came from the back of the pack and just failed to secure the win in a four way photo finish.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Mon Sep 22, 2003 8:59 am

John Muir's 4x4 wins at Penn in 1996 and 97 were probably the most dominant in the history of HS track.

Everyone knows the feats of Obea Moore.

But I remember, seeing Sultan McCollough (leg 2, 1997) limping a 48.1 in the heats (average joe doesn't limp a 48.1).

In each year, the opening legs for John Muir, I believe, were 47.2 and 46.7 respectively. Muir set the standard at Penn with regards to opening 400m HS legs.

I know it's not anchors legs, but....Peace.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby tandfman » Mon Sep 22, 2003 9:52 am

Well, if you want to talk about high school relay anchors at Penn, if you're of a certain age, nothing can or is ever likely to be as thrilling as Don Webster. Not Obea, not William, not nobody.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby 6 5.5hjsteve » Mon Sep 22, 2003 10:18 am

"The King", I have to offer a correction to part of your statement about "44.6 relay leg when the world record in the 400m during the fifties was 46.8."

Not even close ! As long ago as 1932 it was 46.2, got down to 46.0 in 1939, then 45.9 about 1950 or so. That's a looooong way from 46.8.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Mon Sep 22, 2003 11:17 am

< The Kingston anchor came from the back of the pack and just failed to secure the win >

I remember that race at Penns. The Kingston anchor however was one Terence McRae who had earlier won the 400mH High School Boys. Davian Clarke ran the third leg on that Kingston team bringing them from a hopeless position to at least be in touch with the leaders.

My vote for an exciting multi finish and spectacular anchor however would go to the '92 NCAA 4 x 400m men. In that race Deon Minor, Chris Nelloms, Quincy Watts and Derek Mills 4 renowned relay demons & all world class quarter milers at the time each received the baton within a few meters of each other. Derek Mills ran a smart race saving his effort for the last 100 meters to prevail in the end.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby The King » Mon Sep 22, 2003 12:18 pm

>"The King", I have to offer a correction to
>part of your statement about "44.6 relay leg
>when the world record in the 400m during the
>fifties was 46.8."

Not even close ! As long
>ago as 1932 it was 46.2, got down to 46.0 in
>1939, then 45.9 about 1950 or so. That's a
>looooong way from 46.8.

Sorry. Thankyou for correcting me.
I just have 46.8s stuck in my head for some reason.
I do not know any reason at all why I said 46.8s!

CRAZY!!!
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Tue Sep 23, 2003 9:38 am

Michael Franks in 1985 World Cup 4X400
I am glad you remember that race...I had it on video and I watched it over and over to get me ready for races in High school. I even put Marty L's commentary on audio tape so I would listen to it on my Walkman at High school meets! I did not bring it to college when competed there but I wish I had..
I can still recite the commentary as best as I can

"oh my God...Armstead has been hit....he's been knocked off the track...the US is in some seriou trouble...Michael Franks can still run the race of his life and pull this one out for the US...He has Egbunike (sp?) and Schoenlebe(sp)ahead of him The current ruling is this...if the (Kirk) Baptiste protest is upheld and the disqualification is upheld..the US would have to finsih no lower than third (?) to win the team title...and here comes Franks!...what an effort! dive Michael...Dive!..HE GOT IT! The African looked around (Marty Liquori's voice cracks)
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Tue Sep 23, 2003 11:53 am

No King you are the aren't the only one who would have used MJ on the 4x100. He would have been my 3rd leg everytime a 4x100 was run. The guy from a running start was the best curve runner ever. His pr in the 100 was 10.09, but we all know that he could faster than that. He ran 10.12 in the first 100 out of the blocks in the 200 final in Atlanta in 96'. So we know that he could go sub 10.00 in the right race. MJ's 42.94 in 19.93 was the best 4x400 I've ever seen. J.J. Johnson's anchor recebtly in Paris was very impressive, especially since it was against Dwain Chambers.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby ndamix » Thu Oct 02, 2003 6:31 pm

You can't count out Renaldo Nehemiah's 4 X 4 anchor leg at the 1979 Penn Relays. When Nehemiah got the baton, Maryland was way behind the leader (Anthony Blair of Tennessee and Tim Dale of Villanova).

Nehemiah made his move down the backstretch to get into contention. Then as they were moving towards home, Nehemiah did something that still has folks talking about to this day, he raised is index finger and plowed past Blair and Dale like they were standing still.

Although his split was 44.3 (or 44.2...can't remember which), the race was all the more remarkable because it occurred on a rainy, cold Saturday. Also, you got to remember he ran a sub-20 split on the 4 x 2 earlier that day.
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Re: Most Thrilling Anchor Leg Ever?

Postby Guest » Thu Oct 09, 2003 8:37 am

Michael Johnson anchoring Baylor's 4 x 4 unit in the 4 x 4 heats at the 1990 NCAAs in Durham, NC.

I remember sitting in the stands at that race and watching Michael take off and catching everyone with 200m to go. By the time he hit the homestraight, he was way ahead of everyone. When he started to shutdown, everyone in the stands figured it was to conserve his energy for his remaining races to come.

I remember looking at my stopwatch (to capture his split) and asking someone next to me what time they had for MJ (cause I couldn't believe what my watch had captured). The person next to me said, "43.5" and shook his watch to make sure it was right. That time matched the one on my watch.

What was so amazing was that in my section of the stands, all you heard was 43.5 from everyone there; but no one wanted to believe it was possible. Imagine everyone's shock when the time was announced.

Talk about a thriller. It wasn't so much a thriller, but a stunner.
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