krummenacker


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krummenacker

Postby Guest » Wed Jun 18, 2003 11:38 am

there was a story on krumenacker's injury on aol. he is entered in both the 800 and 1500 and will make a last minute decision about which event if anyone. the 800 starts tomorrow, the 1500 on friday. i think he should do the shorter distance, his chance at the worlds are much better in that event.
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Re: krummenacker

Postby Guest » Wed Jun 18, 2003 4:09 pm

>there was a story on krumenacker's injury on aol.
>he is entered in both the 800 and 1500 and will
>make a last minute decision about which event if
>anyone. the 800 starts tomorrow, the 1500 on
>friday. i think he should do the shorter
>distance, his chance at the worlds are much
>better in that event.


It would depend on the order of events. Since the 800 (his specialty) is first what does he have to lose by giving the 15 a shot?

He will probably drop the 15 at the worlds but again, if the 8 final is over before the 1st 15 round what does he have to lose? Go for both.

Earning a spot in the 15 might be a bit of a challenge for him. But, he would definately be in the running for the top three.
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Re: krummenacker

Postby Guest » Wed Jun 18, 2003 10:51 pm

David Krummenacker kicks ass!!!!!!!
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Re: krummenacker

Postby Guest » Thu Jun 19, 2003 12:07 am

the 1500 meters in the usatf is always tactical. he might get stepped on, boxed etc. he should put his effort in the 800, even his first round heat is the most difficult of the three
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Re: krummenacker

Postby Guest » Thu Jun 19, 2003 12:01 pm

Krummenacker is America's only short distance star. He is now even more important to US track field since Alan Webb is turning out to be a bust.

For better or worst Krummenacker is America's best middle distance runner. For the sack of American distance running lets hope he is not hurt too bad.


It seems American milers think a 4:00 mile is good enough. Are American milers trapped in a 1972 frame of mind when it comes to the mile. The rest of the world is thinking 3:50 or under.
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Re: krummenacker

Postby trackstar » Thu Jun 19, 2003 12:57 pm

>Krummenacker is America's only short distance
>star. He is now even more important to US track
>field since Alan Webb is turning out to be a
>bust.

Alan Webb is not a bust! Let's get some perspective, people -- regardless of his decision to turn pro, he would have only been the equivalent of a college sophomore this year. It's a might bit early to be describing him as a "bust." Can we please allow him a little time to develop before devouring him? After all, most middle distance stars don't hit their peak until their late 20s or even their 30s. (Can anyone say Regina Jacobs?)

Check back in five years or so, then we can properly adjudge his career.
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Re: krummenacker

Postby Guest » Thu Jun 19, 2003 1:20 pm

Ditto to Lee's coments above. Can't wait to read all the posts next year when Alan make the Athens team on how everyone "knew" he would. I'm in the kids camp until he proves me wrong.
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Re: krummenacker

Postby Guest » Sat Jun 21, 2003 2:45 pm

It seems American milers think a 4:00 mile is good enough. Are American milers trapped in a 1972 frame of mind when it comes to the mile.

Yikes--I agree with this assessment, but you have to push the clock back a good deal farther than 1972, when 4:00 was no big deal at all--try about 1960! It's amazing how competitive (at their primes of course) Ryun, Mills, Lindgren, etc., would be today in US meets. Not to mention the '70s generation (Wohlhuter, Pre, Shorter, etc.) We've been seeing Devolution in action here in the good 'ole USofA for some time now....
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Re: krummenacker

Postby Guest » Sat Jun 21, 2003 3:16 pm

>It seems American milers think a 4:00 mile is
>good enough. Are American milers trapped in a
>1972 frame of mind when it comes to the mile.
>

Yikes--I agree with this assessment, but you
>have to push the clock back a good deal farther
>than 1972, when 4:00 was no big deal at all--try
>about 1960! It's amazing how competitive (at
>their primes of course) Ryun, Mills, Lindgren,
>etc., would be today in US meets. Not to mention
>the '70s generation (Wohlhuter, Pre, Shorter,
>etc.) We've been seeing Devolution in action
>here in the good 'ole USofA for some time now....

a lot of physical education programs have been cut out, and with over 60% of americans obese or overweight there is less of a talent pool to choose from. i think that may be one of the reasons as any unneeded weight eliminates one from being a top runner.
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Re: krummenacker

Postby Guest » Sat Jun 21, 2003 4:02 pm

I am waiting for the first obese 4 minute miler.

Future US today headline:

OBESE BOY (240lbs) RUNS 4 MINUTE MILE!

If they can have master races why can't they have races for fat people. Running a 5 minute mile at 240 lbs is almost as hard as a fit person running a 4 minute mile.
Instead of the Dream mile we could have the obese mile.
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Re: krummenacker

Postby Guest » Sat Jun 21, 2003 4:34 pm

Krummenacker is America's only short distance star. He is now even more important to US track field since Alan Webb is turning out to be a bust.
For better or worst Krummenacker is America's best middle distance runner. For the sack of American distance running lets hope he is not hurt too bad.>

this comment is partially true and a bit unfair to webb. DK is probably on the way towards the peak of his career, he won the world indoor, has run 1.43 and is race savvy even on the international arena. he is our top guy in the middle distances right now. webb on the other hand is still a couple years out of high school, he is still at college soph level. in webb's even most american and even some of the european runners dont get better until their late 20s and sometimes early 30s. i think webb might not peak for another 5-7 yrs. if he has not done anything until then, obviously calling him a bust would be justified. it is still way too early to call a 20yr a bust especially in the mile where race experience is a key !
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Re: krummenacker

Postby Guest » Sun Jun 22, 2003 7:24 am

What is the chances of any US miler making the World Championship.
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Re: krummenacker

Postby Guest » Sun Jun 22, 2003 8:23 am

this comment is partially
>true and a bit unfair to webb. DK is probably on
>the way towards the peak of his career, he won
>the world indoor, has run 1.43 and is race savvy
>even on the international arena. he is our top
>guy in the middle distances right now.>

Webb reminds me of the Krum of a few years ago. Can't get down the straight. The difference in Krum of last year and indoors this year and his previous years is his ability to run the last 150.
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Re: krummenacker

Postby Guest » Sun Jun 22, 2003 11:56 am

>It seems American milers think a 4:00 mile is
>good enough. Are American milers trapped in a
It's amazing how competitive (at
>their primes of course) Ryun, Mills, Lindgren,
>etc., would be today in US meets. Not to mention
>the '70s generation (Wohlhuter, Pre, Shorter,
>etc.) We've been seeing Devolution in action
>here in the good 'ole USofA for some time now....

It's also interesting that the problems with the US getting three runners to meet the A standard in distance events coincides with the arrival of EPO and guys like Rosa and Hermens running for the safe from testing hills of E. Africa.
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Re: krummenacker

Postby Guest » Sun Jun 22, 2003 2:15 pm

Beautiful finish by David today.
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