Olympic Sprinters why should i drag my toe?


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Re: Olympic Sprinters why should i drag my toe?

Postby cladthin » Mon Oct 01, 2012 7:34 pm

Marlow wrote:
DJG wrote: What would you (How) figure to be his pure 100 m time based on his 12.80 for 110m w/10 hurdles? Is there an accepted conversion for estimating 100 time from 110 hurdle time?

Unknowable. There are too many variables. I would GUESS that a sub-13 hurdler would need at least 10.30 speed (if properly trained for the 100). I'd further guess that Aries could have run 10.40 the day he ran 12.80, but that with a month's sprint-specific training he could get that down to 10.20. Focusing ONLY on the 100 might get that all the way down to 10.00. All of these guesses are substantiated by absolutely nothing!
Aries is ultra-hyper-super-quick, that's for sure, as quick as ANY sprinter out there (Bolt included), but how that translates into top-end speed is problematic.


I agree, too many variables to make any equation or conversion (I don't know of any actually) reliable except for the outside possibility of trying to predict an individual's times based upon previous data of the relationship between the highs and the flat for that person. Because the spacings so limit the use of max. velocity it's very difficult to say what a guy would run on the flat. Didn't Oliver guess he's (D.O. that is) closer to 10.50? I believe AM's 7 stride approach to H1 would probably much more similar to the stride lengths he would use in a 60 or 100m flat (than a 8 stride approach would) if he were to run one though he certainly would not be "up" so soon with no hurdle to clear. It seems that some high hurdlers can exhibit such high frequency and their stride lengths and leg lengths seem to match up well with the built in restrictions of the hurdle spacing yet might not be as fast on the flat as one might predict though that could be, in part, because they only hurdle and rarely if ever allow their strides to "open up".

Some coaches don't want their high hurdlers doing any speed changes/ins-outs or fly-ins for fear of disrupting their hurdle rhythm and stride length/pattern. I have always felt the need to do at least some volume of flat work work in late GPP into SPP and continue flat sprint work even if only in the form of some 30-40m accelerations throughout the year though the emphasis certainly moves to a greater volume of actual sprint hurdling. Here's a good interview with AM's coach Andreas Behm outlining much of the detailed philosophy of the training program.

http://www.elitetrack.com/blogs/details/7385/
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Re: Olympic Sprinters why should i drag my toe?

Postby Marlow » Tue Oct 02, 2012 6:30 am

cladthin wrote:http://www.elitetrack.com/blogs/details/7385/

Thanks for the link - I love that stuff!

A few excerpts:
The other major technical component [besides the 7-step approach] we refined was his hurdle clearance. We worked on establishing consistent takeoff distances, an aggressive takeoff angle, closing down into and over the hurdle as well as continuously moving his limbs over the top of the hurdle. All this resulted in him clearing the hurdle a lot lower and more fluidly than he used to.

In our system acceleration and speed development lay the foundation for everything we do. I would much rather manipulate variables such as training volume and/or density before I reduce training intensity.

The younger the training age of the athlete, the more important hurdle drills are for developmental purposes. We use drills with these athletes to introduce postures and movement concepts,

We rarely, if ever hurdle at regular hurdle height and spacing. In an effort to establish fast hurdle rhythms between the hurdles we lower and discount the hurdles. The only hurdle which remains fairly in place is the first hurdle, all others we move in. Early in the year we tend to work over 4-6 hurdles with the focus being on a dynamic approach and optimal hurdling speed/rhythm,

I have put an added emphasis on such lifts as quarter squats, low box step ups and explosive movements from shallow flexion.
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Re: Olympic Sprinters why should i drag my toe?

Postby fourjz » Tue Oct 02, 2012 6:57 am

So I take it we are done on the "toe drag" issue,and moved on to hurdle training theory ? :wink:
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Re: Olympic Sprinters why should i drag my toe?

Postby cladthin » Tue Oct 02, 2012 9:07 am

Marlow wrote:
cladthin wrote:http://www.elitetrack.com/blogs/details/7385/

Thanks for the link - I love that stuff!

A few excerpts:
The other major technical component [besides the 7-step approach] we refined was his hurdle clearance. We worked on establishing consistent takeoff distances, an aggressive takeoff angle, closing down into and over the hurdle as well as continuously moving his limbs over the top of the hurdle. All this resulted in him clearing the hurdle a lot lower and more fluidly than he used to.

In our system acceleration and speed development lay the foundation for everything we do. I would much rather manipulate variables such as training volume and/or density before I reduce training intensity.

The younger the training age of the athlete, the more important hurdle drills are for developmental purposes. We use drills with these athletes to introduce postures and movement concepts,

We rarely, if ever hurdle at regular hurdle height and spacing. In an effort to establish fast hurdle rhythms between the hurdles we lower and discount the hurdles. The only hurdle which remains fairly in place is the first hurdle, all others we move in. Early in the year we tend to work over 4-6 hurdles with the focus being on a dynamic approach and optimal hurdling speed/rhythm,

I have put an added emphasis on such lifts as quarter squats, low box step ups and explosive movements from shallow flexion.


Yeah, no problem. It's not often a coach goes into such detail short of releasing a dvd, book or presenting at a clinic/seminar. I think Behm became Merritt's full time coach back in 2009 (at least based upon what I think I saw or read on flotrack) but I imagine(?) Vince Anderson has remained in an advisory role since that's who I believe Merritt moved to College Station to work with, originally.
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Re: Olympic Sprinters why should i drag my toe?

Postby cladthin » Tue Oct 02, 2012 9:10 am

fourjz wrote:So I take it we are done on the "toe drag" issue,and moved on to hurdle training theory ? :wink:


Yes, it's interesting how the theme of the thread sort of changed gears.
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Re: Olympic Sprinters why should i drag my toe?

Postby DJG » Wed Oct 03, 2012 11:25 am

cladthin wrote:
fourjz wrote:So I take it we are done on the "toe drag" issue,and moved on to hurdle training theory ? :wink:


Yes, it's interesting how the theme of the thread sort of changed gears.


Tie-in: Is there a danger that a toe-dragging start will carry over to the toe-up-and-out clearing
position for clearing the hurdle?

Now this thread is back on track. :P
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Re: Olympic Sprinters why should i drag my toe?

Postby Marlow » Wed Oct 03, 2012 12:44 pm

DJG wrote:Now this thread is back on track. :P

Well, I certainly know what happens when I drag my toe over the hurdle - face-plant!
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Re: Olympic Sprinters why should i drag my toe?

Postby fourjz » Wed Oct 03, 2012 3:51 pm

DJG wrote:
cladthin wrote:
fourjz wrote:So I take it we are done on the "toe drag" issue,and moved on to hurdle training theory ? :wink:


Yes, it's interesting how the theme of the thread sort of changed gears.


Tie-in: Is there a danger that a toe-dragging start will carry over to the toe-up-and-out clearing
position for clearing the hurdle?

Now this thread is back on track. :P

Ha Ha ! Thank you.ha Ha! :lol:
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