Indoor Track Dimensions


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Indoor Track Dimensions

Postby polevaultpower » Sun Oct 15, 2006 6:13 pm

I am doing a project for a facilities class at school that involves designing an indoor track. Unfortunately it's part of a multi-sports complex, and I need to fit tennis courts inside of it, so I can't make it as cool as I would like.

What is the approximate square footage for a standard 200 meter indoor track?

What is the best way to throw the weight and minimize space used? I never really paid that much attention to how they did weight throw when I was competing.

Any advice?
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Postby eldrick » Sun Oct 15, 2006 11:53 pm

you probably have this link :

http://www.iaaf.org/newsfiles/29266.pdf ... dimensions

note : it doesn't give the ranges of radii ( obviously set limits ) - so you can vary curve lengths/straights to get bigger "central" area to fit in tennis courts, etc - you'll need to search for ranges

i don't think it's a calculus problem to get maximum infield area ( but it looks a "fun" problem - i'll try it if i get some time ), so try a few different radii/straight lengths ( total must add upto 200m ) & note infield area
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Postby eldrick » Mon Oct 16, 2006 1:41 am

calculus was of limited benefit - all it showed was the maximum infield area is when the track is a circle !

therefore to get the largest infield area, you will need to have the track as close to a circle as possible - you will need shortest permissible straights & largest curves

you will need to check specs of iaaf/ncaa/usatf to find these

the only problem with such a track will be that you are likely to have slow 200 & 400 times ( probably won't affect distance times so much ) & it may be a tight squeeze to fit in the the 60m straight for the shortest sprints

it all depends what it's main priority is : fast times or more room for throws & tennis court
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Re: Indoor Track Dimensions

Postby tandfman » Mon Oct 16, 2006 6:03 am

polevaultpower wrote:What is the best way to throw the weight and minimize space used? I never really paid that much attention to how they did weight throw when I was competing.

It almost doesn't matter because the weight is almost always thrown when nothing else is going on. You should have enough room on the infield for the weight. I've seen them in the corner and I've seen them centered near the finish line of the 60. You can do either if there are no raised runways or sand landing pits in the way. The corner at the head of the home straight seems to be a popular location.

I should add that for a number of reasons, the weight is sometimes thrown at a different location from the rest of the track meet. Depending on what's in the infield and where, that may be a preferable solution.
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Postby polevaultpower » Mon Oct 16, 2006 7:26 am

eldrick wrote:it all depends what it's main priority is : fast times or more room for throws & tennis court


I want the fastest times possible with the minimum space needed for the tennis courts.
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Postby eldrick » Mon Oct 16, 2006 9:35 am

polevaultpower wrote:
eldrick wrote:it all depends what it's main priority is : fast times or more room for throws & tennis court


I want the fastest times possible with the minimum space needed for the tennis courts.


then just use 1/2 the standard outdoor 400m track dimensions : 116m curve & 84m straight - 1/2 those & raise the banking to maximum permissible height - that will give you fastest possible times & i'm sure plenty of room for a tennis court in the infield
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Postby mcgato » Mon Oct 16, 2006 10:03 am

A quick combination of google and Excel gives me:

**A tennis court should be 20x40 yards, which includes area on the side of the court and behind the baseline.
**A 200 m track with 42 m straight will be 36.9 m wide. Thus the square part of the infield will be 42 x 36.9 m or 45.9 x 40.4 yds. Thus there appears to be enough room for two tennis courts side by side in the infield.
**If one straight is extended, it can be the 42 + 36.9 = 78.9 m, enough room for sprints. With a zone for slowing down before hitting a wall (something the University of Florida does not include).

I will sit back and await the first person to point out where my math and other errors are, because I would be surprised if this is correct.
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Postby polevaultpower » Mon Oct 16, 2006 10:17 am

Banked versus unbanked...

I would love to build an imaginary banked track, however, one of the ways I plan to sell the idea is by having it open for public use (or at least student and faculty use) and for other teams to train on (this is pretending to be built at a school that does not have any kind of track facilities).

I am assuming the public would not want to walk/jog laps on a banked track. Am I wrong?
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Postby BruceFlorman » Mon Oct 16, 2006 12:34 pm

polevaultpower wrote:I am assuming the public would not want to walk/jog laps on a banked track. Am I wrong?

How much banking do the authorities in question allow?!? I can imagine that casual joggers/walkers might object to fifteen degrees of banking, but five or so seems like a figure that wouldn't generate much complaint.
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Postby hammer forever » Mon Oct 16, 2006 3:06 pm

would the NYC Armory facility be a good example for a banked track with a weight throw sector?

www.armorytrack.com
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Postby tandfman » Mon Oct 16, 2006 4:42 pm

hammer forever wrote:would the NYC Armory facility be a good example for a banked track with a weight throw sector?

www.armorytrack.com

I didn't see a schematic on that web site showing where the weight throw is located at the armory. (I may have not drilled down to the right page.) I know that when the USATF Nationals were held there a few years ago, they put the weight throw circle right near the finish line of the sprints, in the middle of the track. More recently, I believe they've established a weight throw area outside the perimeter of the track, behind the start of the sprint straight.
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Postby polevaultpower » Mon Oct 16, 2006 9:34 pm

hammer forever wrote:would the NYC Armory facility be a good example for a banked track with a weight throw sector?

www.armorytrack.com


When I looked at their site before, I couldn't find a diagram or picture of their layout. I've never been there personally.
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Postby Bruce Kritzler » Mon Oct 16, 2006 11:19 pm

You can use hydraulics on the banks to vary them. Leave it flat for other activities.
If your long jump pit is on the infield you will have to account for its space not infringing on tennis courts?
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Re: Indoor Track Dimensions

Postby nbonaddio » Tue Oct 17, 2006 12:10 am

polevaultpower wrote:I am doing a project for a facilities class at school that involves designing an indoor track. Unfortunately it's part of a multi-sports complex, and I need to fit tennis courts inside of it, so I can't make it as cool as I would like.

What is the approximate square footage for a standard 200 meter indoor track?

What is the best way to throw the weight and minimize space used? I never really paid that much attention to how they did weight throw when I was competing.

Any advice?


This is somewhat of a shot in the dark, but the school that I went to that seemed to have a great combination tennis court/indoor track was Case Western in Cleveland, Ohio. The turns I remember being unusually tight (400m ran about a second slower for everyone) but all in all, it was an excellent facility. You might want to shoot them a line. Brandeis in Boston may have also had tennis courts on their infield, but I don't remember offhand.

Most other facilities in my area (Ohio/WPa) are oversized (Akron, Kent St.), non-multipurpose (Denison, Baldwin-Wallace), or banked (Penn St, Pitt).

As far as the throwing sectors at the Armory, I seem to remember them being in a very odd place, tucked off in a corner with the stands coming up all around them, at the far side of the track (~100m from start), with the hydraulic bank rising the track up in the distance.
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Postby vaultman » Wed Oct 18, 2006 6:14 pm

The Armory like V-Tech and Clemson all Throw out side the track in the corner. VT and the Armory are banked and clemson is flat. UNC has a track like Clemson but they throw on one end of the infield toward the curve with barriers to stop the weight and shots. UNC also uses their building for football as well, they have a giant roll of astro-turf that covers the entire track.

Becca can the tennis courts be the same surface as the track mondo/rubber?
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Postby MJR » Wed Oct 18, 2006 6:32 pm

At a very minimum, you want a facility that is 75m x 75m and that is if all of the field events are done inside the track, it is flat and you have no stands. 100m x 100m would be more acceptable and give many more configuration options. Also, having a 10m ceiling is needed to account for the dropdown lights and HVAC system without killing a PVer, or at least giving them a nice sunburn from the halogen bulbs. For the metricly challenged, this means a building of 65000 square feet to do it right, larger if you want something like they have at the Prince George's County in Maryland.
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Postby James Fields » Thu Oct 19, 2006 10:02 am

" one of the ways I plan to sell the idea is by having it open for public use"
--------
I seem to recall that the indoor football competition facility for Minnesota's pro team could be used during the harsh winter by local runners -- a popular concept that engendered good will among the public including taxpayers. Individuals may have paid one dollar for each usage.

(This was about 1992-93 when I worked in Wisconsin where there are many indoor track facilities, including high schools, that could provide a good information base for your project and its related research.)
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Postby Bear Coach » Thu Oct 19, 2006 10:09 am

The problem wtih having a track that is 200m and is for multi use is that to get the fast times you want you have to bank the thing usually...lets face it nobady really wants to run on a flat 200m track. The indoor track in the fitness area at IUPIU in indianapolis has a 200m flat that they put some stuff around for more uses, weight, basketball court, etc. THey got the max use out of that area depending on the season. If you are going to put tennis in the middle you may be able to play with it and get 2-3 courts, but when you add the banks, unless you go hydrolic you really just have a track with some courts in the middle which doesn't make for a very multi use area. Most indoor facilites can get away with a area that is 65,000sqft, I believe that is the size of the building that the Arkansas track is in.

If you have to stay with a flat cerface you might as well oversize the thing and really get the max out of the area. Iowa State has a great indoor area and I actually had one designed. It was about 80,000 sqft and fit a 300m plus track in it. iT also fit 2 full size basketball courts in that ran length wise.

The hardest part of all this is getting the funding for it. If it is at Universtiy you can pull it off because you are looking at about a 5-10 million dollar facility, public on the other hand you have to get some very generous people or companies that want to give you large amounts of cash with no guarantee of a return anytime soon...lets face it most indoor tracks don't really kick up a business plan too much....they are more like a monster of squar feet with little revenew coming off that sqft being used.
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Re: Indoor Track Dimensions

Postby bambam » Thu Oct 19, 2006 6:26 pm

A great facility that sounds like what you are trying to design is the Westwood Sports Complex in Sterling, Illinois. You could contact them for information on their track. My wife grew up in that town and I used to workout there a lot when we lived there for one year. I was there this year for our niece's wedding and Westwood and the track are still doing well.
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Postby polevaultpower » Thu Nov 02, 2006 10:12 am

What is a really rough estimate of how much a 200 meter hydraulic banked mondo track costs?
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Postby MJR » Thu Nov 02, 2006 1:26 pm

Depending on what construction costs are per sq foot in your area, it will run $8-16 million for the building, electric, plumbing, networking, HVAC, and other assorted things that come with a good track facility.

Start saving now!

Then there are the annual maintenance costs and payroll for employees, etc.
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Postby gh » Thu Nov 02, 2006 3:43 pm

Do schools really care about 200m tracks anymore? Seems that whenever a major new installation goes in these days they're putting in 300m oversized monsters.
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Postby polevaultpower » Thu Nov 02, 2006 8:49 pm

gh wrote:Do schools really care about 200m tracks anymore? Seems that whenever a major new installation goes in these days they're putting in 300m oversized monsters.


Space is at a huge premium in my imaginary project. It's based on my grad school, but there is no way they would ever actually build an indoor track, which is a shame.
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Postby polevaultpower » Thu Nov 02, 2006 8:51 pm

MJR wrote:Depending on what construction costs are per sq foot in your area, it will run $8-16 million for the building, electric, plumbing, networking, HVAC, and other assorted things that come with a good track facility.

Start saving now!

Then there are the annual maintenance costs and payroll for employees, etc.


It's a multiuse facility, I just need the cost to lay down the mondo and put in the hydraulic parts. I already factored in buying all the track equipment.
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Postby JRM » Thu Nov 02, 2006 8:59 pm

gh wrote:Do schools really care about 200m tracks anymore? Seems that whenever a major new installation goes in these days they're putting in 300m oversized monsters.


Really? I'd like to see that. Where are these new tracks?
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Postby gh » Thu Nov 02, 2006 10:07 pm

Washington for a start
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More big tracks

Postby James Fields » Fri Nov 03, 2006 8:23 am

gh wrote: Do schools really care about 200m tracks anymore? Seems that whenever a major new installation goes in these days they're putting in 300m oversized monsters.

JRM asked: Really? I'd like to see that. Where are these new tracks?

GH replied: Washington for a start. [University of -- in Seattle]
------------
See also University of Idaho in Moscow, Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, and East Tennessee State University in Johnson City.

Each has lots of seating for indoor football. None of these big tracks are banked which makes racewalking comfortable there. East Tennessee has hosted NAIA national indoor championships.

Other forum members may add to the four named sites to create a useful list for athletes seeking a wintertime training refuge.
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Postby dj » Fri Nov 03, 2006 8:42 am

polevaultpower wrote:
MJR wrote:Depending on what construction costs are per sq foot in your area, it will run $8-16 million for the building, electric, plumbing, networking, HVAC, and other assorted things that come with a good track facility.

Start saving now!

Then there are the annual maintenance costs and payroll for employees, etc.


It's a multiuse facility, I just need the cost to lay down the mondo and put in the hydraulic parts. I already factored in buying all the track equipment.


If this is a multiuse facility you may want to rethink the hydraulic track.

The hydraulic track sounds like a nice solution--it's easy to raise and lower--but you're introducing a new problem when you convert to a non-track use. Now you have seams running through your tennis court, or whatever.

As the building settles, these seams may be as wide as 1-4cm, and the variance of the floor to the lowered track could be just enough to trip over. So you've created a liability situation.

This isn't a significant factor if the seams do not appear on any playing surface, but don't think that a hydraulic track is a magic cure-all for a multi-use facility.
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Postby gh » Fri Nov 03, 2006 10:14 am

This should probably get a thread of its own, but those monster tracks are making a mockery of NCAA indoor qualifying.
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Postby MJR » Fri Nov 03, 2006 11:23 am

They are also ineligible for records.
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Postby polevaultpower » Fri Nov 03, 2006 1:37 pm

dj wrote:If this is a multiuse facility you may want to rethink the hydraulic track.

The hydraulic track sounds like a nice solution--it's easy to raise and lower--but you're introducing a new problem when you convert to a non-track use. Now you have seams running through your tennis court, or whatever.

As the building settles, these seams may be as wide as 1-4cm, and the variance of the floor to the lowered track could be just enough to trip over. So you've created a liability situation.

This isn't a significant factor if the seams do not appear on any playing surface, but don't think that a hydraulic track is a magic cure-all for a multi-use facility.


The tennis courts should all be in the infield , so if there are any seams they should only be on the outer edges of any tennis courts.
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